A. David Lewis

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A. David Lewis
BornAaron David Lewis
1977 (age 40–41)
Boston, Massachusetts
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Writer
Notable works
The Lone and Level Sands

Aaron David Lewis (born 1977 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American comic book and graphic novel writer. He is also a comics scholar focusing on literary theory and religious studies.

Early life[edit]

Raised in Framingham, Massachusetts, Lewis is the founder of the Caption Box comic book imprint.[1] He has also served as an instructor at Georgetown University, Northeastern University, MCPHS, Bentley University, and Boston University (as a Teaching Fellow for Frank Korom, Stephen Prothero, and Steven T. Katz). Additionally, he has given lectures at conferences such as WizardWorld,[2] the San Diego Comic-Con, and the New York Comic-Con, among others. He is an Editorial Board member for the International Journal of Comic Art under editor John Lent.[3]

In the late 2006, Lewis started a PhD program studying religion and literature at Boston University.[4] There he also helped organize the "Graven Images: Religion in Comic Books and Graphic Novels Conference"[5] and co-edit its later text Graven Images: Religion in Comic Books and Graphic Novels published in 2010.[6] He completed his PhD in 2012 and revamped his dissertation work into the book American Comics, Literary Theory, and Religion: The Superhero Afterlife published in 2014 by Palgrave Macmillan.

Career[edit]

Lewis's 2005 work, The Lone and Level Sands (written by Lewis, and illustrated by Marvin Mann and Jennifer Rodgers), won a Howard E. Day Prize and has been nominated for three Harvey Awards in 2007.[7] His 2002 creation, Mortal Coils, was named one of the winners of the 2003 Cinescape Literary Genre Competition,[8] and in 2004 it was given the Paper Screen Gem Award for Mystery/Suspense.[9] It was republished as a hardcover, color edition by Archaia Comics; Mann and Lewis collaborated again through Archaia with Some New Kind of Slaughter, or Lost in the Flood (and How We Found Home Again): Diluvian Myths from around the World in 2009.

In 2011, Lewis became co-editor of Muktatafaht: A Middle East Comics Anthology initially through the Harvard University Center of Middle East Studies' Outreach Center but, due to administrative circumstances,[10] shopped elsewhere. He is also the organizer of the Chain World Freeform Comics Experiment and its customized book The Tome, and, in 2014, a founding member of Sacred and Sequential, an organization of religion & comics scholars.[11]

In 2015, Lewis's co-edited volume with Christopher Moreman, entitled Digital Death: Mortality and Beyond in the Online Age, was a winner of the Ray at Pat Browne Award for "Best Edited Collection",[12] and his American Comics, Literary Theory, and Religion: The Superhero Afterlife was nominated for "Best Scholarly/Academic Work" in the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards.[13]

Comics bibliography[edit]

  • "Alabaster Cities" in 9-11: Emergency Relief (Alternative Comics, 2001)
  • Mortal Coils (Red Eye Press & Caption Box, 2002–2005)
  • The Lone and Level Sands (with art by Marvin Perry Mann and Jennifer Rodgers, Caption Box, 2005; Archaia Studios Press, 2006) [14]
  • Empty Chamber (with art by Jason Copland, Silent Devil Entertainment, 2007)
  • "Res Libero" in Postcards: True Stories That Never Happened (with art by Danielle Corsetto, Villard, 2007) [15]
  • Some New Kind of Slaughter, or Lost in the Flood (and How We Found Home Again): Diluvian Myths from Around the World (with writing and art by Marvin Perry Mann, Archaia Studios Press, 2008) [16]
  • Kismet, Man of Fate (with art by Noel Tuazon, colors by Rob Croonenborghs, and letters by Taylor Esposito, A Wave Blue World, 2017-present)[17]

Scholarly bibliography[edit]

  • Graven Images: Religion in Comic Books and Graphic Novels as co-editor with Christine Hoff Kraemer (Continuum, 2010)
  • Digital Death: Mortality and Beyond in the Online Age as co-editor with Christopher Moreman (Praeger, 2014)
  • American Comics, Literary Theory, and Religion: The Superhero Afterlife (Palgrave, 2014)
  • Muslim Superheroes: Comics, Islam, and Representation as co-editor with Martin Lund (Mizan, 2017)

References[edit]

  1. ^ About Caption Box Archived February 3, 2007, at the Wayback Machine., Caption Box
  2. ^ Levy, David (2005-10-20). "Behind the spandex: secrets of the superheroes". The Jewish Advocate. Archived from the original on July 22, 2006. Retrieved 2007-03-31.
  3. ^ "About IJOCA". International Journal of Comic Art. Archived from the original on 5 May 2007. Retrieved 2007-03-31.
  4. ^ Waltz, Vicky (2007-02-12). "Comic Conspiracy". BU Today. Boston University. Archived from the original on 13 March 2007. Retrieved 2007-03-31.
  5. ^ Graven Images: Religion in Comics, Comic Book Resources, May 8, 2008
  6. ^ Google Books: Graven Images.
  7. ^ Taylor, Denise (2007-03-04). "Picturing the world". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 14 March 2007. Retrieved 2007-03-31.
  8. ^ "Mann and Lewis offer LONE AND LEVEL SANDS online". Comic World News. 2004-03-24. Retrieved 2007-03-31.
  9. ^ Mike Bullock (2004-06-14). "Paper Screen Gems". Broken Frontier. Archived from the original on 2006-11-12. Retrieved 2007-03-31.
  10. ^ Lewis, A. David (December 5, 2014). "The Middle East Comic Book Anthology You'll Never Read". ISLAMiCommentary. Duke Islamic Studies Center. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  11. ^ Klassen, Asher (July 22, 2014). "New Websites and Research Plans". Watercolour Horizons. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  12. ^ "Cal State East Bay Philosophy Department Chair Wins National Pop Culture Award". California State University, East Bay. May 7, 2015. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  13. ^ "2015 Eisner Awards Nominations". San Diego Comic-Con International. Archived from the original on 13 June 2015. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  14. ^ Archaia Studios Press Archived October 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.
  15. ^ POSTCARDS: True Stories That Never Happened
  16. ^ Archaia Studios Press Archived September 28, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.
  17. ^ UNDER CURRENT - Kismet, Man of Fate