ACM/IEEE Supercomputing Conference

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SC, The International Conference for High Performance Computing Networking, Storage, and Analysis
Status Active
Genre High Performance Computing Conference
Country United States United States
Inaugurated 1988
Most recent 2017 (Denver)
Next event 2018 (Dallas)
Organized by ACM SIGHPC and IEEE Computer Society

SC (formerly Supercomputing), the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, is the name of the annual conference established in 1988 by the Association for Computing Machinery and the IEEE Computer Society. In 2016, about 11,000 people participated overall.[1] The not-for-profit conference is run by a committee of approximately 600 volunteers who spend roughly three years organizing each conference.

Not to be confused with the International Supercomputing Conference.

Sponsorship and Governance[edit]

SC is sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery and the IEEE Computer Society. From its formation through 2011, ACM sponsorship was managed through ACM's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture (SIGARCH). Sponsors are listed on each proceedings page in the ACM DL; see for example.[2] Beginning in 2012,[3] ACM began the process of transitioning sponsorship from SIGARCH to the recently formed Special Interest Group on High Performance Computing (SIGHPC). This transition was completed after SC15,[4] and for SC16 ACM sponsorship was vested exclusively in SIGHPC (IEEE sponsorship remained unchanged).[5] The conference is non-profit.

The conference is governed by a steering committee that includes representatives of the sponsoring societies, the current conference general chair, the general chairs of the preceding two years, the general chairs of the next two conference years, and a number of elected members.[6] All steering committee members are volunteers, with the exception of the two representatives of the sponsoring societies, who are employees of those societies. The committee selects the conference general chair, approves each year's conference budget, and is responsible for setting policy and strategy for the conference.

Conference Components[edit]

Although each conference committee introduces slight variations on the program each year, the core components of the conference remain largely unchanged from year to year.

Technical Program[edit]

The SC Technical Program is competitive with an acceptance rate around 20% for papers (see History). Traditionally, the program includes invited talks, panels, research papers, tutorials, workshops, posters, and Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions.[7]

Awards[edit]

Each year, SC hosts the following conference and sponsoring society awards:[8]

Exhibits[edit]

In addition to the technical program, SC hosts a research exhibition each year that includes universities, state-sponsored computing research organizations (such as the Federal labs in the US), and vendors of HPC-related hardware and software from many countries around the world. There were 353 exhibitors at SC16 in Salt Lake City, UT.[9]

Student Program[edit]

SC's program for students has gone through a variety of changes and emphases over the years. Beginning with SC15[10] the program is called "Students@SC", and is oriented toward undergraduate and graduate students in computing related fields, and computing-oriented students in science and engineering. The program includes professional development programs, opportunities to learn from mentors, and engagement with SC’s technical sessions.

SCinet[edit]

SCinet is SC’s research network. Started in 1991, SCinet features emerging technologies for very high bandwidth, low latency wide area network communications in addition to operational services necessary to provide conference attendees with connectivity to the commodity Internet and to many national research and engineering networks.

Name changes[edit]

Since its establishment in 1988,[2] and until 1995,[11] the full name of the conference was the "ACM/IEEE Supercomputing Conference" (sometimes: "ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing"). The conference's abbreviated (and more commonly used) formal name was "Supercomputing 'XY", where XY denotes the last two digits of the year. In 1996, according to the archived front matter of the conference proceedings,[12] the full name was changed to the ACM/IEEE "International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications". The latter document further announced that, as of 1997, the conference will undergo a name change and will be called "SC97: High Performance Networking and Computing". The document explained that

1997 [will mark] the first use of "SC97" as the name of the annual conference you've known as "Supercomputing 'XY". This change reflects our growing attention to networking, distributed computing, data-intensive applications, and other emerging technologies that push the frontiers of communications and computing.

— SC97 Call for Participation, included in the archived front matter of Supercomputing '96.[12]

A 1997 HPCwire article discussed at length the reasoning, considerations, and concerns that accompanied the decision to change the name of the conference series from "Supercomputing 'XY" to "SC 'XY",[13] stating that

It's official: the age of supercomputing has ended. At any rate, the word "supercomputing" has been excised from the title of the annual trade shows, sponsored by the IEEE and ACM, that have been known for almost ten years as "Supercomputing '(final two digits of year)". The next event, to be held in San Jose next November, has been redesignated "SC '97." Like Lewis Carroll's Cheshire Cat, "supercomputing" has faded steadily away until only the smile, nose, and whiskers remain. [...] The loss is a real one. An enormous range of ordinary people had some idea, however vague, what "supercomputing" meant. No-caf, local alternatives like "SC" and "HPC" lack this authority. This is not a trivial issue. In these days of rapid change, passing technofancies, and information overload, a rose with the wrong name is just another thorn -- or forgotten immediately. After all, how can businessmen, ordinary consumers, and taxpayers be expected to pay money for something they can't comprehend? More important, will investors and grant-givers hand over money to support further R&D on something whose only identity is an arbitrary clump of capital letters?

— Norris Parker Smith. HPCwire. February 7, 1997.

Despite these concerns, the abbreviated name of the conference, "SC", is still used today, a reminiscent of the abbreviation of the conference's original name—"Supercomputing Conference".

The full name, in contrast, underwent several changes. Between 1997 and 2003,[14][15][16][17][18][19][20] the name "High Performance Networking and Computing" was specified in the front matter of the archived conference proceedings in some years (1997, 1998, 2000, 2002), whereas in other years it was omitted altogether in favor of the abbreviated name (1999, 2001, 2003). In 2004,[21] the stated front matter full name was changed to "High Performance Computing, Networking and Storage Conference". In 2005,[22] this name was replaced by the original name of the conference—"supercomputing"— in the front matter. Finally, in 2006,[23] the current full name, as used today, emerged: "The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis".

Despite all of the name variances in the proceedings through the years, the digital library of ACM, the co-sponsoring society, records the name of the conference as "The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing" from 1998 - 2008, when it changes to ""The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis". It is these two names that are used in the full citations to the conference proceedings provided in this article.

History[edit]

The table below provides the location, name of the general chair, and acceptance statistics for each year of SC. Note that references for data in these tables apply to data preceding the reference to the left on the same row; for example, for SC17 the single reference substantiates all the information in that row, but for SC05 the source for the convention center and chair is different than the source for the acceptance statistics.

Peer reviewed paper measures
Year Location Conference center Chair Accepted Submitted Percentage (%)
2018 Dallas, Texas Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Ralph McEldowney [24] 265
2017 Denver, Colorado Colorado Convention Center Bernd Mohr 61 327 18.7%[25]
2016 Salt Lake City, Utah Salt Palace Convention Center John West 81 446 18.3%[5]
2015 Austin, Texas Austin Convention Center Jackie Kern 79 358 22% [4]
2014 New Orleans, Louisiana New Orleans Morial Convention Center Trish Damkroger 83 394 21%[26]
2013 Denver, Colorado Colorado Convention Center William Gropp 91 449 20%[27]
2012 Salt Lake City, Utah Salt Palace Convention Center Jeff Hollingsworth 100 461 22% [3]
2011 Seattle, Washington Washington State Convention Center Scott Lathrop 74 352 21%[28]
2010 New Orleans, Louisiana New Orleans Morial Convention Center Barry Hess 51 253 20%[29]
2009 Portland, Oregon Oregon Convention Center Wilf Pinfold 59 261 23%[30]
2008 Austin, Texas Austin Convention Center Pat Teller 59 277 21%[31]
2007 Reno, Nevada Reno-Sparks Convention Center Becky Verastegui 54 268 20%[32]
2006 Tampa, Florida Tampa Convention Center[33] Barbara Horner-Miller 54 239 23%[23]
2005 Seattle, Washington Washington State Convention Center William Kramer[34] 62 260 24% [22]
2004 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania David L. Lawrence Convention Center Jeffrey C. Huskamp[35] 60 200 30%[21]
2003 Phoenix, Arizona Phoenix Civic Plaza Convention Center James R. McGraw[36] 60 207 29%[20]
2002 Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore Convention Center[37] Roscoe Giles 67 230 29%[19]
2001 Denver, Colorado Colorado Convention Center[38] Charles Slocomb 60 240 25%[18]
2000 Dallas, Texas Dallas Convention Center[39] Louis Turcotte 62 179 35%[17]
1999 Portland, Oregon Oregon Convention Center Cherri Pancake[16]
1998 Orlando, Florida Orange County Convention Center Dennis Duke[15]
1997 San Jose, California San Jose Convention Center Dona Crawford[14]
1996 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania David L. Lawrence Convention Center[40] Beverly Clayton[12]
1995 San Diego, California San Diego Convention Center[41] Sid Karin 69 241 29%[11]
1994 Washington, D.C. Washington D.C. Convention Center[42] Gary Johnson[43]
1993 Portland, Oregon Oregon Convention Center[44] Bob Borchers 72 300 24%[45]
1992 Minneapolis, Minnesota Minneapolis Convention Center Bill Buzbee[46] 75 220 34%[47]
1991 Albuquerque, New Mexico Albuquerque Convention Center Ray Elliott 83 215 39%[48]
1990 New York, New York New York Hilton Midtown[49] Joanne Martin[50]
1989 Reno, Nevada Reno-Sparks Convention Center Ron Bailey[51]
1988 Orlando, Florida Orange County Convention Center George Michael 40%[2]

The following table details the keynote speakers during the history of the conference; as of SC17, 20% of the keynote speakers have been female, with a mix of speakers from corporate, academic, and national government organizations.

Conference Keynote Speaker Gender Affiliation[52] Job Title [52] Presentation Title
SC17 Philip Diamond Male International Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project Director General Life, the Universe and Computing: The Story of the SKA Telescope[53]
SC16 Katharine Frase Female IBM (Retired) Chief Technology Officer of Public Sector Cognitive Computing: How can we accelerate human decision making, creativity and innovation using techniques from Watson and beyond?[54]
SC15 Alan Alda Male Actor Getting Beyond a Blind Date with Science: Communicating Science for Scientists[55]
SC14 Brian Greene Male Columbia University Professor The Quest for Nature's Deepest Laws[56]
SC13 Genevieve Bell Female Intel Intel Fellow The Secret Life of Data[57]
SC12 Michio Kaku Male City University of New York Professor Physics of the Future[58]
SC11 Jen-Hsun Huang Male NVIDIA CEO Exascale: An Innovator's Dilemma[28]
SC10 Clayton M. Christensen Male Harvard Business School Professor How to Create New Growth in a Risk-Minimizing Environment[29]
SC09 Al Gore Male US Government Former Vice President of the United States Building Solutions: Energy, Climate and Computing for a Changing World[59]
SC08 Michael Dell Male Dell Founder and CEO Higher Performance: Supercomputing in the Connected Era[60]
SC07 Neil Gershenfeld Male MIT Professor Programming Bits and Atoms[32]
SC06 Ray Kurzweil Male Inventor The Coming Merger of Biological and Non-Biological Intelligence[23]
SC05 Bill Gates Male Microsoft CEO The Changing Role of IT in the Sciences[22]
SC04 Tom West Male National LambdaRail CEO NLR: Providing the Nationwide Network Infrastructure for Network and "Big Science" Research[35]
SC03 Donna Cox Female NCSA Professor Beyond Computing: The Search for Creativity[36]
SC02 Rita Colwell Female National Science Foundation Director Computing: Getting us on the Path to Wisdom[37]
SC01 Craig Venter Male Celera Genomics Founder Accelerating Discovery through Supercomputing[38]
SC00 Steve Wallach Male CenterPoint Ventures Advisor Petaflops in the year 2009[39]
SC99 Donna Shirley Female NASA Mars Exploration Program manager Managing Creativity in Technical Projects[61]
SC98 Bran Ferren Male Walt Disney Imagineering President of R&D There's No Bits Like Show Bits[62]
SC97 Paul Saffo Male Institute for the Future Director Is Digital Dead?[63]
SC96 Frances Allen Female IBM IBM Fellow Scaling Up[64]
SC95 William A. Wulf Male University of Virginia Professor And Now For Some "Really" Super Computing[65]
SC94 Ed McCracken Male SGI CEO Making the NII Real[66]
SC93 Neal Lane Male National Science Foundation Director HPCC and the NII[67]
SC92 Larry Smarr Male NCSA Director Grand Challenges! Voyages of Discovery in the 1990s [68]
SC91 Allan Bromley Male Office of Science and Technology Policy Chair The President's Initiative in HPCC[48]
SC90 Danny Hillis Male Thinking Machines Corporation Founder The Fastest Computers[67]
SC89 John Rollwagon Male Cray Research CEO Supercomputing – A Look Into the Future[67]
SC88 Seymour Cray Male Cray Research Founder What's this about Gallium Arsenide?[69]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Just Released: SC16 Breaks Exhibits and Workshop Attendance Records" (Press release). Salt Lake City: SC16. November 18, 2016. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  2. ^ a b c Proceedings of SC88. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Orlando, FL, USA. 1988. ISBN 0-8186-0882-X. 
  3. ^ a b Proceedings of SC12. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Salt Lake City, UT, USA. 2012. ISBN 978-1-4673-0804-5. 
  4. ^ a b Proceedings of SC15. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Austin, TX, USA. 2015. ISBN 978-1-4503-3723-6. 
  5. ^ a b Proceedings of SC16. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Salt Lake City, UT, USA. 2016. ISBN 978-1-4673-8815-3. 
  6. ^ "SC Steering Committee". The Supercomputing Conference Series. Retrieved 2016-11-06. 
  7. ^ "SC16 Full Conference Program". SC16 conference website. Retrieved 2016-11-06. 
  8. ^ "SC16 Awards Program". SC16 conference website. Retrieved 2016-11-06. 
  9. ^ "SC16 List of Exhibitors". SC16 exhibitor directory. Retrieved 2016-11-06. 
  10. ^ "Students@SC". SC15 conference website. Retrieved 2016-11-06. 
  11. ^ a b Proceedings of SC95. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. San Diego, CA, USA. 1995. ISBN 0-89791-816-9. 
  12. ^ a b c Proceedings of SC96. The ACM/IEEE International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications. Pittsburgh, PA, USA. 1996. ISBN 0-89791-854-1. Retrieved 2016-04-17. 
  13. ^ Smith, Norris Parker (1997-02-07). "Supercomputing is dead; the new king needs a name". HPCwire. Retrieved 2016-04-17. 
  14. ^ a b Proceedings of SC97. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. San Jose, CA, USA. 1997. ISBN 0-89791-985-8. 
  15. ^ a b Proceedings of SC98. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Orlando, FL, USA. 1998. ISBN 0-89791-984-X. 
  16. ^ a b Proceedings of SC99. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Portland, OR, USA. 1999. ISBN 1-58113-091-0. 
  17. ^ a b Proceedings of SC00. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Dallas, TX, USA. 2000. ISBN 0-7803-9802-5. 
  18. ^ a b Proceedings of SC01. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Denver, CO, USA. 2001. ISBN 1-58113-293-X. 
  19. ^ a b Proceedings of SC02. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Baltimore, MD, USA. 2002. 
  20. ^ a b Proceedings of SC03. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Phoenix, AZ, USA. 2003. ISBN 1-58113-695-1. 
  21. ^ a b Proceedings of SC04. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Pittsburgh, PA, USA. 2004. ISBN 0-7695-2153-3. Retrieved 2016-04-17. 
  22. ^ a b c Proceedings of SC05. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Seattle, WA, USA. 2005. ISBN 1-59593-061-2. 
  23. ^ a b c Proceedings of SC06. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Tampa, FL, USA. 2006. ISBN 0-7695-2700-0. 
  24. ^ SC18 website. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  25. ^ Proceedings of SC17. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Denver, CO, USA. 2017. ISBN 978-1-4503-5114-0. 
  26. ^ Proceedings of SC14. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. New Orleans, LA, USA. 2014. ISBN 978-1-4799-5500-8. 
  27. ^ Proceedings of SC13. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Denver, CO, USA. 2013. ISBN 978-1-4503-2378-9. 
  28. ^ a b Proceedings of SC11. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Seattle, WA, USA. 2011. ISBN 978-1-4503-0771-0. 
  29. ^ a b Proceedings of SC10. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. New Orleans, LA, USA. 2010. ISBN 978-1-4244-7559-9. 
  30. ^ Proceedings of SC09. The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. Portland, OR, USA. 2009. ISBN 978-1-60558-744-8. 
  31. ^ Proceedings of SC08. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Austin, TX, USA. 2008. ISBN 978-1-4244-2835-9. 
  32. ^ a b Proceedings of SC07. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Reno, NV, USA. 2007. ISBN 978-1-59593-764-3. 
  33. ^ "Proceedings of SC06, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2006. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  34. ^ "Proceedings of SC05, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2005. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  35. ^ a b "Proceedings of SC04, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2004. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  36. ^ a b "Proceedings of SC03, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2003. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  37. ^ a b "Proceedings of SC02, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2002. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  38. ^ a b "Proceedings of SC01, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2001. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  39. ^ a b "Proceedings of SC00, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 2000. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  40. ^ "High Fiber: Supercomputing Conference Organizers cable the convention for the future". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. November 16, 1996. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  41. ^ "Strong technical program characterizes Supercomputing '95". 1995. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  42. ^ "SC index". 1994. Archived from the original on March 3, 2012. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  43. ^ Proceedings of SC94. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Washington, D.C., USA. 1994. ISBN 0-8186-6605-6. 
  44. ^ "SCD Computing News". 14 (1). May 7, 1993. Retrieved May 7, 2012. 
  45. ^ Proceedings of SC93. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Portland, OR, USA. 1993. ISBN 0-8186-4340-4. 
  46. ^ "Proceedings of SC92, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1992. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  47. ^ Proceedings of SC92. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Minneapolis, MN, USA. 1992. ISBN 0-8186-2630-5. 
  48. ^ a b Proceedings of SC91. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Albuquerque, NM, USA. 1991. ISBN 0-89791-459-7. 
  49. ^ "Proceedings of SC90, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1990. Retrieved 2016-11-05. 
  50. ^ Proceedings of SC90. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. New York City, NY, USA. 1990. ISBN 0-89791-412-0. 
  51. ^ Proceedings of SC89. The ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing. Reno, NV, USA. 1989. ISBN 0-89791-341-8. 
  52. ^ a b Information current as of the date of the conference
  53. ^ SC17 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  54. ^ SC16 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  55. ^ SC15 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  56. ^ SC14 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  57. ^ SC13 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  58. ^ SC12 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  59. ^ SC09 Press Release. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  60. ^ SC08 keynote webpage. Retrieved 02-01-2018
  61. ^ "Proceedings of SC99, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1999. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  62. ^ "Proceedings of SC98, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1998. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  63. ^ "SC97 Announces Keynoter Paul Saffo and Technical Panels". HPCwire. November 14, 1997. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  64. ^ "Keynoter Allen Sees Future in Terms of Virtual Enterprise". HPCwire. November 4, 1997. Retrieved January 31, 2018. 
  65. ^ "Proceedings of SC95, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1995. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  66. ^ "Proceedings of SC94, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1994. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 
  67. ^ a b c "SC 25th Anniversary – The Complete History of Keynotes" (PDF). The Exascale Report. November 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  68. ^ "National Metacenter for Computational Science and Engineering". NCSA access. Vol. 6 no. 4. NCSA. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  69. ^ "Proceedings of SC88, front matter" (PDF). ACM Digital Library. 1988. Retrieved 2018-02-01. 

External links[edit]