ACT Greens

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The ACT Greens
Leader Shane Rattenbury
Founded 1992
Headquarters 85 Northbourne Avenue, Turner ACT 2612
Ideology Green Politics
International affiliation Global Greens
Asia-Pacific Green Network
Website
act.greens.org.au

The ACT Greens is a green political party located in the Australian Capital Territory, and a member of the federation of the Australian Greens.

As of the 2008 election, the ACT Greens hold the balance of power in the 17-member Legislative Assembly, with four members, to Labor's seven and the Liberals with six.[1][2][3] After almost two weeks of deliberations with both the Labor and Liberal parties, the Greens chose to support a Labor minority government.[4][5][6]

The Greens and the ALP signed a 'Parliamentary Agreement' to formalize the arrangement. Under the agreement, the Greens secured a range of policy outcomes in the areas of schools and education, health service provision, housing, public transport and gay rights. It also ensures that the Greens will Chair three of the Assembly's key committees. In exchange, the Greens agreed to maintain confidence in Chief Minister Jon Stanhope.[7] The Greens also secured Government support for the nomination of Shane Rattenbury as Speaker of the Assembly.[8]

The Greens have required the Government to report on progress against the measures outlined in the agreement on an annual basis. The first joint communiqué on the progress of the agreement was issued in July 2008.[9] The next communiqué will be issued in July 2010.

Following the 2012 ACT election, Shane Rattenbury was the only ACT Greens MLA to retain his seat in the Legislative Assembly.,[10] however he entered into a power sharing arrangement to allow the Labor Party to form minority government.

Rattenbury retained a seat in the expanded Legislative Assembly at the 2016 ACT election. Caroline Le Couteur was also reelected after losing her seat in 2012. The Greens maintained their position in the balance of power for a third consecutive term, again supporting a Labor minority government.[11]

Election results[edit]

Legislative Assembly
Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Government
1995 14,967 9.1 (#3)
2 / 17
1998 16,417 9.1 (#4)
1 / 17
Decrease 1
2001 17,369 9.1 (#3)
1 / 17
Steady 0
2004 18,997 9.3 (#3)
1 / 17
Steady 0
2008 33,057 15.6 (#3)
4 / 17
Increase 3
2012 23,773 10.7 (#3)
1 / 17
Decrease 3
2016 25,109 10.3 (#3)
2 / 25
Increase 1
Federal House of Representatives Senate
2001 7.1%[12] 7.22%
2004 10.8%[13] 16.36%
2007 13.2%[14] 21.47%
2010 19.2%[15] 22.92%
2013 13.4% [16] 19.27%
2016 15.09% [17] 16.1%

Candidates from the ACT Greens have not been elected to either the Senate or the Lower House of federal parliament.

Current Legislative Assembly members[edit]

Previous Legislative Assembly members[edit]

Kerrie Tucker and Lucy Horodny

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ACT 2008 - ABC elections". Abc.net.au. 2008-10-18. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  2. ^ Williams, George (2008-10-25). "Case for a new umpire: Canberra Times 25/10/2008". Canberratimes.com.au. Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  3. ^ "Greens take extra seat in ACT election: ABC News 25/10/2008". Abc.net.au. Archived from the original on 2 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  4. ^ "Labor to form minority government in ACT: The Age 31/10/2008". News.theage.com.au. 2008-10-31. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  5. ^ Stockman, David (2008-11-01). "Greens' nod sees Stanhope keep job: Canberra Times 1/11/2008". Canberratimes.com.au. Retrieved 2011-02-01. [dead link]
  6. ^ Labor-Greens parliamentary agreement PDF Archived February 25, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ Parliamentary Agreement for the Seventh Legislative Assembly for the ACT (2008) Archived February 25, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ ABC News (2008) Rattenbury Elected Assembly Speaker. November 5th, 2009
  9. ^ ACT Government Joint Communiqué on the ACT Parliamentary Agreement (2008) Archived October 13, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ "Bourke dumped for Rattenbury". ABC News. 6 November 2012. Retrieved 21 January 2014. 
  11. ^ "Shane Rattenbury and Andrew Barr have first post-election meeting". Canberra Times. 20 October 2016. Retrieved 23 October 2016. 
  12. ^ http://results.aec.gov.au/10822/Website/index.html
  13. ^ http://results.aec.gov.au/12246/results/HouseStateFirstPrefsByParty-12246-ACT.htm
  14. ^ http://results.aec.gov.au/13745/Website/HouseStateFirstPrefsByParty-13745-ACT.htm
  15. ^ http://results.aec.gov.au/15508/Website/HouseStateFirstPrefsByParty-15508-ACT.htm
  16. ^ http://results.aec.gov.au/17496/Website/HouseFirstPrefsTppByDivision-17496-ACT.htm
  17. ^ http://results.aec.gov.au/20499/Website/HouseStateFirstPrefsByParty-20499-ACT.htm

External links[edit]