AC Greyhound

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AC Greyhound
AC Greyhound Saloon 1962.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Production 1959–1963
83 made[1]
Body and chassis
Class Grand tourer
Powertrain
Engine 2.0/2.2/2.6 litre I6
Transmission 4-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 100 in (2,540 mm) [2]
Length 175 in (4,445 mm) [2]
Width 65.5 in (1,664 mm) [2]
Height 53 in (1,346 mm) [2]
Curb weight 2,240 lb (1,020 kg)[3]

The AC Greyhound (1959–1963) was a 2+2 version of the Ace and Aceca automobiles made by AC Cars of Thames Ditton, Surrey, England and announced for the opening of the Motor Show in October 1959.[4] The Greyhound, of which 83 examples were built,[citation needed] had a two-door, four-seater aluminium body, and inherited most of the technical components of the Ace and Aceca but it had a wheelbase 10 inches or 250mm longer and coil springs in place of a transverse leaf spring at the front:

  • ladder-frame chassis
  • independent coil spring suspension front and rear. Unlike the Ace and Aceca the rear suspension used semi-trailing arms.
  • 4-speed manual gearbox, overdrive optional
  • rack and pinion steering;
  • 11.75 in (298 mm) disc brake front, 11 in (279 mm) drum brake rear

Various straight-six engines were fitted:

  • 1.991-litre AC Cars OHC (75 bhp @ 4500 rpm; 1000 kg)
  • 1.971-litre Bristol 100D2 OHV, (125 bhp @ 5750 rpm; 1015 kg)
  • 2.216-litre Bristol (105 bhp @ 4700 rpm; 1093 kg)
  • 2.553-litre Ford Zephyr (up to 170 bhp @ 5500; 1040 kg)
1962

A 2-litre Bristol engined car with overdrive tested by The Motor magazine in 1961 had a top speed of 110 mph (180 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 11.4 seconds. A fuel consumption of 21.8 miles per imperial gallon (13.0 L/100 km; 18.2 mpg‑US) was recorded. The test car cost £3185 including taxes.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robson, G (2006). A-Z of British Cars 1945-1980. Devon, UK: Herridge. ISBN 0-9541063-9-3. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "The A.C. Greyhound". The Motor. 2 August 1960. 
  3. ^ L.A.Manwaring, ed. (1961). The Observer's Book of Automobiles. London, UK: Frederick Warne & Co. p. 33. 
  4. ^ Disc Brakes. The Times, Tuesday, 20 Oct 1959; pg. 16; Issue 54596