Ryzen

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Ryzen
AMD ryzen stylized.svg
General information
LaunchedFebruary 2017 (released March 2, 2017)[1]
Marketed byAdvanced Micro Devices
Designed byAdvanced Micro Devices
Common manufacturer(s)
Performance
Max. CPU clock rate3.0 GHz to 4.9 GHz
Architecture and classification
Min. feature size14 nm to 7 nm
MicroarchitectureZen
Zen+
Zen 2
Zen 3
Instruction setMain processor:
x86-64
MMX(+), SSE1, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4a, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2
AES, CLMUL, RDRAND, SHA, SME
AMD-V, AMD-Vi
AMD Secure Processor:
ARM A5
Physical specifications
Transistors
  • 4.8 billion for Zen & Zen+ (per 14/12 nm 8-core "Zeppelin" die)[1]

    5.89 billion (1× CCD) or
    9.69 billion (2× CCD) for Zen 2
    (3.8 billion per 7 nm 8-core "CCD" & 2.09 billion for the 12 nm "I/O die")[2]

    6.24 billion (1x CCD) or
    10.39 billion (2x CCD) for Zen 3
    (4.15 billion per 7 nm 8-core "CCD" & 2.09 billion for the same 12 nm "I/O die")[3]
Cores
  • Mainstream: Up to 16 cores[4][5]
    HEDT: Up to 64 cores[6]
Socket(s)
History
PredecessorFX

Ryzen (/ˈrzən/ RY-zən)[7] is a brand[8] of x86-64 microprocessors designed and marketed by Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) for desktop, mobile, server, and embedded platforms based on the Zen microarchitecture. It consists of central processing units (CPUs) marketed for mainstream, enthusiast, server, and workstation segments and accelerated processing units (APUs) marketed for mainstream and entry-level segments and embedded systems applications.

AMD officially announced a new series of processors, named "Ryzen", during its New Horizon summit on December 13, 2016 and introduced Ryzen 1000 series processors in February 2017, featuring up to 8 cores and 16 threads, which launched on March 2, 2017.[9] The second generation of Ryzen processors, the Ryzen 2000 series, features the Zen+ microarchitecture, an incremental improvement built on a 12 nm process technology from GlobalFoundries, was released in April 2018 and featured a marginal 10% total aggregate performance increase (3% IPC, 6% frequency, 10% overall[10]) over Ryzen 1000 processors[11] that first released in 2017.[12] The third generation of Ryzen processors launched on July 7, 2019 and based on AMD's Zen 2 architecture, features more significant design improvements with a 15% IPC boost[13] and a further shrink to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company's (TSMC) 7 nm first generation process. On June 16, 2020, AMD announced new Ryzen 3000 series XT processors with 4% higher boost clocks versus non XT processors.[14] On October 8, 2020, AMD announced the highly anticipated Zen 3 architecture for their Ryzen 5000 series processors, featuring a 19% instructions per cycle (IPC) improvement over Zen 2, while being built on the same 7 nm TSMC node with reported 5 GHz[15] boost operating frequencies in the wild.[16] With the launch of Zen 3 via the Ryzen 5000 series, AMD has taken the gaming performance crown from Intel, and is an important performance milestone in itself as gaming performance is based on single thread performance[17] above all else.[18]

A majority of AMD's consumer Ryzen products use the Socket AM4 platform. In August 2017, AMD launched their Ryzen Threadripper line aimed at the enthusiast workstation market. AMD Ryzen Threadripper uses the larger TR4, sTRX4, and sWRX8 sockets, which support additional memory channels and PCI Express lanes.

In December 2019, AMD started producing first generation Ryzen products built using the second generation Zen+ architecture.[19] The most notable example is Ryzen 5 1600, with newest batches, having "AF" identifier instead of its usual "AE", being essentially a rebadged Ryzen 5 2600 with the same specifications as the original Ryzen 5 1600.

History[edit]

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X top and pins

Ryzen and the fundamental "Zen" CPU microarchitecture its uses were especially significant for AMD since it was a completely new, "from scratch" design and marked the corporation's return to the high-end CPU market after a decade of near-total absence since 2006, the launch of Intel Core in the DDR2 era.[20] This is because AMD's primary competitor Intel had largely dominated this market segment starting from the 2006 release of their Core microarchitecture (marketed as "Core 2"), after abandoning the Pentium 4's extremely uncompetitive (with AMD's Athlon XP and Athlon 64) Netburst microarchitecture for an upgraded version of the prior Pentium 3, which notably continues to underpin Intel's CPU designs to this very day.[21]

Until Ryzen's initial launch in the spring of 2017, Intel's market dominance over AMD would only continue to increase as simultaneously with the above top-to-bottom launch of the now famous "Intel Core" CPU lineup and branding, was the successful roll out of their well known "tick-tock" CPU release strategy. This then brand new release strategy was most famous for alternating between a new CPU microarchitecture and a new fabrication node each and every year; with it being something that over time would eventually become a release cadence they'd manage to stick to for almost an entire decade (specifically lasting from Intel Core's initial summer 2006 launch with 65 nm Conroe, all the way until the 14 nm Broadwell desktop CPUs were delayed a year from a planned 2014 launch out to summer 2015 instead. This would necessitate a refresh of their pre-existing 22 nm Haswell CPU lineup instead, and thus officially end "tick-tock" as a practice).[22][23] And it's for these same exact reasons that this became incredibly important for AMD, as Intel's inability to further sustain "tick-tock" past around 2014 would prove absolutely critical, if not outright essential in providing both the initial and continually growing market openings for their Ryzen CPUs and the Zen CPU microarchitecture in general to succeed.

Also of note is the release of AMD's Bulldozer microarchitecture in 2011, which despite being a clean sheet CPU design like Zen, had been optimized for parallel computing above all else, which was then still very much in its infancy (which led to starkly inferior real-world performance in any workload that wasn't highly threaded) and thus ended up uncompetitive in basically every area outside of raw multithreading and its use in low power APUs with integrated Radeon graphics.[24] Despite a die shrink and several revisions of the Bulldozer architecture, performance and power efficiency failed to catch up with Intel's competing products.[25] Cumulatively, all of this practically forced AMD to abandon the entire high-end CPU market (including desktop, laptops, and server/enterprise) until Ryzen's release in spring 2017.

Ryzen is the consumer-level implementation of the newer Zen microarchitecture, a complete redesign that marked the return of AMD to the high-end CPU market, offering a product stack able to compete with Intel at every level.[26][27] Having more processing cores, Ryzen processors offer greater multi-threaded performance at the same price point relative to Intel's Core processors.[28] The Zen architecture delivers more than 52% improvement in instructions per cycle (clock) over the prior-generation Bulldozer AMD core, without raising power use.[29] The changes to instruction set also makes it binary-compatible with Intel's Broadwell, smoothing the transition for users.[30]

Threadripper, which is geared for high performance desktops (HEDT), wasn't developed as part of a business plan or a specific roadmap; instead, a small enthusiast team inside AMD saw an opportunity that something could be developed between the Ryzen and Epyc CPU roadmaps that would put the crown of performance on AMD. After some progress was made in their spare time, the project was greenlit and put in an official roadmap by 2016.[31]

Since the release of Ryzen, AMD's CPU market share has increased while Intel's appears to have stagnated and/or regressed.[32]

Features[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Product lineup[edit]

Ryzen 1000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

  • Socket AM4 for Ryzen and Socket TR4 for Ryzen Threadripper.[33][34]
  • Based on first generation Zen. Ryzen CPUs based on Summit Ridge architecture. Threadripper based on Whitehaven architecture.
  • 4.8 billion transistors per 192 mm2[35] 8-core "Zeppelin" die[1] with one die being used for Ryzen and two for Ryzen Threadripper.
  • Stepping: B1[36]
  • Memory support:
    • Ryzen dual-channel: DDR4–2666 ×2 single rank, DDR4–2400 ×2 dual rank, DDR4–2133 ×4 single rank, or DDR4–1866 ×4 dual rank.[33][37]
    • Ryzen Threadripper quad-channel: DDR4–2666 ×4 single rank, DDR4–2400 ×4 dual rank, DDR4–2133 ×8 single rank, or DDR4–1866 ×8 dual rank.
  • Instructions Sets: x87, MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AES, CLMUL, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2, SHA.[30]
  • All Ryzen-branded CPUs (except Pro variants) feature unlocked multipliers.
  • AMD's SenseMI Technology monitors the processor continuously and uses Infinity Control Fabric to offer the following features:[33][38][39]
    • Pure Power reduces the entire ramp of processor voltage and clock speed, for light loads.
    • Precision Boost increases the processor voltage and clock speed by 100–200 MHz if three or more cores are active (five or more, in the case of Threadripper, and by 300 MHz); and significantly further when less than three are active (less than five, in the case of Threadripper).[40]
    • XFR (eXtended Frequency Range) aims to maintain the average clock speed closer to the maximum Precision Boost, when sufficient cooling is available.[41]
    • Neural Net Prediction and Smart Prefetch use perceptron based neural branch prediction inside the processor to optimize instruction workflow and cache management.
  • Ryzen launched in conjunction with a line of stock coolers for Socket AM4: the Wraith Stealth, Wraith Spire and Wraith Max. This line succeeds the original AMD Wraith cooler, which was released in mid-2016.[42] The Wraith Stealth is a bundled low-profile unit meant for the lower-end CPUs with a rating for a TDP of 65 W, whereas the Wraith Spire is the bundled mainstream cooler with a TDP rating of 95 W, along with optional RGB lighting on certain models. The Wraith Max is a larger cooler incorporating heatpipes, rated at 140 W TDP.
Model Release date
and price
Fab Chiplets Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket PCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory support[ii] TDP
Base PBO
1–2
(≥3)
XFR[43]
1–2
L1 L2 L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200[44] July 27, 2017
US $109
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD 4 (4) 2 × 2 3.1 3.4
(3.1)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 1200 [45] July 27, 2017
OEM
3.1 3.4
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 Pro 1300 [46] July 27, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 1300X[47] July 27, 2017
US $129
3.5 3.7
(3.5)
3.9
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 1400 [48] April 11, 2017
US $169
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD 4 (8) 2 × 2 3.2 3.4
(3.4)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 1500 [49] April 11, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
? 2 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen 5 1500X[50] April 11, 2017
US $189
3.5 3.7
(3.6)
3.9
Ryzen 5 1600 [51] April 11, 2017
US $219
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.2 3.6
(3.4)
3.7
Ryzen 5 Pro 1600 [52] April 11, 2017
OEM
3.2 3.6
(?)
?
Ryzen 5 1600X [53] April 11, 2017
US $249
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1 95 W
Performance
Ryzen 7 1700 [54] March 2, 2017
US $329
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD 8 (16) 2 × 4 3.0 3.7
(3.2)
3.75 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 1700 [55] March 2, 2017
OEM
3.0 3.8
(?)
?
Ryzen 7 1700X [56] March 2, 2017
US $399
3.4 3.8
(3.5)
3.9 95 W
Ryzen 7 1800X [57] March 2, 2017
US $499
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 1900X [58] August 31, 2017
US $549
GloFo
14LP
2 × CCD[iii] 8 (16) 2 × 4 3.8 4.0
(3.9)
4.2 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
TR4 64 (60+4) DDR4-2667
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 1920X [59] August 10, 2017
US $799
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.0 4.2 4 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper 1950X [60] August 10, 2017
US $999
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.4 4.0
(3.7)
4.2
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Official Support per AMD. CPU's are unlocked for different memory speeds.
  3. ^ Processor package actually contains two additional inactive dies to provide structural support to the integrated heat spreader.


Ryzen 2000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

The first Ryzen 2000 CPUs, based on the 12 nm Zen+ microarchitecture, were announced for preorder on April 13, 2018[61] and launched six days later. Zen+ based Ryzen CPUs are based on Pinnacle Ridge architecture,[62] while Threadripper CPUs are based on the Colfax microarchitecture. The first of the 2000 series of Ryzen Threadripper products, introducing Precision Boost Overdrive technology,[41] followed in August. The Ryzen 7 2700X was bundled with the new Wraith Prism cooler.

Model Release date
and price
Fab Chiplets Cores
(threads)
Core Config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket PCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory
support
TDP
Base PB2 L1 L2 L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200 AF
(12 nm refresh)[63]
April, 2020
US $60
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD 4 (4) 1 × 4 3.1 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 2300X [64] September 10, 2018
OEM
3.5 4.0
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 2500X [65] September 10, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD 4 (8) 1 × 4 3.6 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600E [66] September 2018
OEM
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.1 4.0 16 MB
8 MB per CCX
DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 5 1600 AF
(12 nm refresh)[67]
October 11, 2019
US $85
3.2 3.6 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600 [68] April 19, 2018
US $199
3.4 3.9
Ryzen 5 2600X [69] April 19, 2018
US $229
3.6 4.2 95 W
November 23, 2018
UK £221.99
Performance
Ryzen 7 2700E [70] September 11, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD 8 (16) 2 × 4 2.8 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 7 2700 [71] April 19, 2018
US $299
3.2 4.1 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
November 23, 2018
UK £285.49
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700 [72] April 2018
OEM
3.2 4.1
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700X [73] September 6, 2018
OEM
3.6 4.1 95 W
Ryzen 7 2700X [74] April 19, 2018
US $329
3.7 4.3 105 W
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 2920X [75] October 2018
US $649
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
2 × CCD 12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.3 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
8 MB per CCX
TR4 64 (60+4) DDR4-2933
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2950X [76] August 31, 2018
US $899
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5 4.4
Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX [77] October 2018
US $1299
4 × CCD 24 (48) 8 × 3 3.0 4.2 64 MB
8 MB per CCX
250 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX [78] August 13, 2018
US $1799
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.0 4.2
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX


APUs[edit]

Desktop[edit]

In January 2018, AMD announced the first two Ryzen desktop APUs with integrated Radeon Vega graphics under the Raven Ridge codename. These were based on first generation Zen architecture. The Ryzen 3 2200G and the Ryzen 5 2400G were released in February.[79]

Model Release Date
& Price
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe lanes Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 2200GE[80] April 19, 2018
OEM
GloFo
14LP
4 (4) 3.2 3.6 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB RX Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU
1100 MHz 1126 AM4 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
35 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 2200GE [81] May 10, 2018
OEM
Ryzen 3 2200G [82] February 12, 2018
US $99
3.5 3.7 65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 2200G [83] May 10, 2018
OEM
Ryzen 5 2400GE [84] April 19, 2018
OEM
4 (8) 3.2 3.8 RX Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1250 MHz 1760 35 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 2400GE [85] May 10, 2018
OEM
Ryzen 5 2400G [86] February 12, 2018
US $169
3.6 3.9 65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 2400G[87] May 10, 2018
OEM
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Mobile[edit]

In May 2017, AMD demonstrated a Ryzen mobile APU with four Zen CPU cores and Radeon Vega-based GPU.[88] The first Ryzen mobile APUs, codenamed Raven Ridge, were officially released in October 2017.[89]

  • 4.95 billion[90] transistors on a 210 mm2 die,[90] based on a modified 14 nm Zeppelin die where four of the cores are replaced by an integrated fifth-generation GCN-based GPU.
  • Precision Boost 2[62]
  • 16 external PCIe 3.0 lanes (four each to chipset and M.2 socket; eight to a PCIe slot). 16 internal PCIe 3.0 lanes for the integrated GPU and on-board input/output (I/O).[citation needed] In 2019, AMD released some new dual core Zen mobile parts branded as 300 or 3000, codenamed Dali.


Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe lanes Memory support TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 2200U[91] January 8, 2018 GloFo
14LP
2 (4) 2.5 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 3 192:12:4
3 CU [92]
1100 MHz 422.4 FP5 12 (8+4) DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 3 3200U[93] January 6, 2019 2.6 3.5 1200 MHz 460.8
Ryzen 3 2300U[94] January 8, 2018 4 (4) 2.0 3.4 Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU [95]
1100 MHz 844.8
Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U[96] May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 5 2500U[98] October 26, 2017[98] 4 (8) 3.6 Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU [99]
1126.4
Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U[100] May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 5 2600H[101] September 10, 2018[102] 3.2 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
Ryzen 7 2700U[103] October 26, 2017[103] 2.2 3.8 Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU [104]
1300 MHz 1664 DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U[105] May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 7 2800H[101] September 10, 2018[102] 3.3 Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1830.4 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Embedded[edit]
Great Horned Owl[edit]

In February 2018, AMD announced the V1000 series of embedded Zen+ Vega APUs, based on the Great Horned Owl architecture, with four SKUs.[106]

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU DDR4
Memory
support
Ethernet TDP Junction
temperature
(°C)
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock
(GHz)
Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
V1500B[107] December 2018 GloFo
14LP
4 (8) 2.2 N/A 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB N/A 2400
dual-channel
2× 10GbE 12–25 W 0–105
V1780B[107] 3.35 3.6 3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
V1202B[107] February 2018 2 (4) 2.3 3.2 RX Vega 3 192:12:16
3 CU
1.0 384 2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
V1404I[107] December 2018 4 (8) 2.0 3.6 RX Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU
1.1 1126.4 −40 – 105
V1605B[107] February 2018 0–105
V1756B[107] 3.25 1.3 1331.2 3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
V1807B[107] 3.35 3.8 RX Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1830.4
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Banded Kestrel[edit]

In April 2019, AMD announced another line of embedded Zen+Vega APUs, namely the Ryzen Embedded R1000 series with two SKUs.[108]

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock
(GHz)
Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost XFR L1 L2 L3
R1102G [109] February 25, 2020 GloFo
14LP
2 (2) 1.2 2.6 Un­known 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB RX Vega 3 192:12:4
3 CU
1.0 384 DDR4-2400
single-channel
6 W
R1305G[109] 2 (4) 1.5 2.8 Un­known DDR4-2400
dual-channel
8-10 W
R1505G[109] April 16, 2019 2.4 3.3 Un­known 12–25 W
R1606G[109] 2.6 3.5 Un­known 1.2 460.8
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Ryzen 3000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

On May 27, 2019, at Computex in Taipei, AMD launched its third generation Ryzen processors which use AMD's Zen 2 architecture. For this generation's microarchitectures, Ryzen uses Matisse, while Threadripper uses Castle Peak. The chiplet design separates the CPU cores, fabricated on TSMC's 7FF process, and the I/O, fabricated on GlobalFoundries' 12 nm process, and connects them via Infinity Fabric.[110] The Ryzen 3000 series uses the AM4 socket similar to earlier models and is the first CPU to offer PCI Express 4.0 (PCIe) connectivity.[111] The new architecture offers a 15% instruction-per-clock (IPC) uplift and a reduction in energy usage. Other improvements include a doubling of the L3 cache size, a re-optimized L1 instruction cache, a larger micro-operations cache, double the floating point performance, improved branch prediction, and better instruction pre-fetching.[110] The 6-, 8- and 12-core CPUs became generally available on July 7, 2019, and 24-core processors were launched in November.[112]

The Ryzen Threadripper 3990X, part of Castle Peak generation of CPUs, has currently[when?] the world's largest number of both cores and threads available in consumer-oriented CPUs - 64 and 128, respectively.[citation needed] The competing Intel Core i9-10980XE processor has only 18 cores and 36 threads. Another competitor, the workstation-oriented Intel Xeon W-3275 and W-3275M, has 28 cores, 56 threads, and cost more when launched.[citation needed]

Model Release date
and price
Fab Chiplets Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket PCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)[ii]
Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 3100[113] April 21, 2020
$99
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 ×I/O
4 (8) 2 × 2 3.6 3.9 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 3300X[114] April 21, 2020
$120
1 × 4 3.8 4.3 16 MB
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 3500 November 15, 2019
OEM (West)
Japan ¥16000[115]
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 ×I/O
6 (6) 2 × 3 3.6 4.1 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 3500X[116] October 8, 2019
China ¥1099
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen 5 3600[117] July 7, 2019
US $199
6 (12) 3.6 4.2
Ryzen 5 Pro 3600[118] September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 5 3600X[119] July 7, 2019
US $249
3.8 4.4 95 W
Ryzen 5 3600XT[120] July 7, 2020
US $249
4.5
Performance
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700[121] September 30, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 ×I/O
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.6 4.4 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W[iii]
Ryzen 7 3700X[123] July 7, 2019
US $329
Ryzen 7 3800X[124] July 7, 2019
US $399
3.9 4.5 105 W
Ryzen 7 3800XT[125] July 7, 2020
US $399
4.7
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 3900[126] October 8, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 ×I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.1 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM4 24 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 Pro 3900[127] September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 9 3900X[128] July 7, 2019
US $499
3.8 4.6 105 W[iv]
Ryzen 9 3900XT[129] July 7, 2020
US $499
4.7
Ryzen 9 3950X[130] November 25, 2019
US $749
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5
High-End Desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 3960X[131] November 25, 2019
US $1399
TSMC
7FF
4 × CCD
1 ×I/O
24 (48) 8 × 3 3.8 4.5 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
128 MB
16 MB per CCX
sTRX4 64 (56+8) DDR4-3200
quad-channel
280 W[v]
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X[133] November 25, 2019
US $1999
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.7 4.5
Ryzen Threadripper 3990X[134] February 7, 2020
US $3990
8 × CCD
1 ×I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.9 4.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
Workstation
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3945WX[135] July 14, 2020
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 ×I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 4.0 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
sWRX8 128 (120+8) DDR4-3200
octa-channel
280 W
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX[136] July 14, 2020
OEM
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.9
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX[137] July 14, 2020
OEM
4 × CCD
1 ×I/O
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.5 4.2 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX[138] July 14, 2020
OEM
8 × CCD
1 ×I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.7 4.2 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ The chipset itself provides additional user-accessible PCIe lanes and integrated PCIe devices, see AM4 chipsets.
  3. ^ Ryzen 7 3700X may consume over 90 W under load.[122]
  4. ^ Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X may consume over 145 W under load.[122]
  5. ^ Ryzen Threadripper 3990X may consume over 490 W under load.[132]


The 4-, 6- and 8-core processors have one core chiplet. The 12- and 16-core processors have two core chiplets. In all cases the I/O die is the same.[110]

The Threadripper 24- and 32-core processors have four core chiplets. The 64-core processor has eight core chiplets. All Threadripper processors use the same I/O die.

APUs[edit]

Both mobile and desktop APUs are based on the Picasso microarchitecture, a 12 nm refresh of Raven Ridge, offering a modest increase in clock speeds (up to an additional 300 MHz maximum boost), Precision Boost 2, an up to 3% increase in IPC from the move to the Zen+ core with its reduced cache and memory latencies, and newly added solder thermal interface material for the desktop parts.[139]

Desktop[edit]
Model Release date
and price
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe lanes Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 Pro 3200GE[140] September 30, 2019 12 nm 4 (4) 3.3 3.8 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB RX Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU
1200 MHz 1228.8 AM4 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
35 W
Ryzen 3 3200G[139] July 7, 2019
US $99
3.6 4.0 1250 MHz 1280 45-65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 3200G[140] September 30, 2019
Ryzen 5 Pro 3350GE[141] July 21, 2020 4 (8) 3.3 3.9 RX Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU
1200 MHz 1536 35 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 3350G[142] 3.6 4.0 1300 MHz 1664 45-65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 3400GE[140] September 30, 2019 3.3 4.0 RX Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1830.4 35 W
Ryzen 5 3400G[139] July 7, 2019
US $149
3.7 4.2 1400 MHz 1971.2 45-65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 3400G[140] September 30, 2019
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Mobile[edit]

In 2019, AMD first released the Ryzen 3000 APUs, consisting only of quad core parts. Then in January 2020, they announced value dual core mobile parts, codenamed Dalí, including the Ryzen 3 3250U.

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe lanes Memory support TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock Processing
power
/(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 3200U[143] January 6, 2019 GloFo
14LP
2 (4) 2.6 3.5 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 3 192:12:14
3 CU
1200 MHz 460.8 FP5 12 (8+4) DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12-25 W
Ryzen 3 3250U[144] January 6, 2020
Ryzen 3 3300U[145] January 6, 2019 GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
4 (4) 2.1 Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU
1200 MHz 921.6 15 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 3300U[146]
Ryzen 5 3500U[147] 4 (8) 3.7 Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU
1228.8
Ryzen 5 Pro 3500U[148]
Ryzen 5 3550H[149] 35 W
Ryzen 5 3580U[150] October 2019 Vega 9 576:36:16
9 CU
1300 MHz 1497.6 15 W
Ryzen 7 3700U[151] January 6, 2019 2.3 4.0 Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU
1400 MHz 1792.0
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700U[152]
Ryzen 7 3750H[153] 35 W
Ryzen 7 3780U[154] October 2019 Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1971.2 15 W
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Ryzen 4000[edit]

APUs[edit]

The Ryzen 4000 APUs are based on Renoir, a refresh of the Zen 2 Matisse CPU cores, coupled with Radeon Vega GPU cores. They were released only to OEM manufacturers in mid-2020. Unlike Matisse, Renoir does not support PCIe 4.0.[155]

Ryzen Pro 4x50G APUs are the same as 4x00G APUs, except they are bundled a Wraith Stealth cooler and are not OEM-only.[156] It is possible this is a listing mistake, since 4x50G CPUs are unavailable on retail (as of Oct. 2020) and PRO SKUs are usually the OEM only parts.

Desktop[edit]
Model Release date
and price
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe
lanes
Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Core Config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[ii] Clock
(GHz)
Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 4300GE [157] July 21, 2020 TSMC
7FF
4 (8) 1 × 4 3.5 4.0 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU
1.7 1305.6 AM4 24 (16+4+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 4350GE[157]
Ryzen 3 4300G[157] 3.8 4.0 65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G[157]
Ryzen 5 4600GE[157] 6 (12) 2 × 3 3.3 4.2 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
Vega 7 448:28:8
7 CU
1.9 1702.4 35 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 4650GE[157]
Ryzen 5 4600G[157] 3.7 4.2 65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 4650G[157]
Ryzen 7 4700GE[157] 8 (16) 2 × 4 3.1 4.3 Vega 8 512:32:8
8 CU
2.0 2048 35 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 4750GE[157]
Ryzen 7 4700G[157] 3.6 4.4 2.1 2150.4 65 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G[157]
  1. ^ Core complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Unified shaders : texture mapping units : render output units and compute units (CU)
  3. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Mobile[edit]

Zen 2 APUs, based on the 7 nm Renoir microarchitecture, commercialized as Ryzen 4000.[158][159][160]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU Socket PCIe
lanes
Memory support TDP
Fab Transistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 4300U[161][162] March 16, 2020 TSMC
7FF
9,800 156 4 (4) 1 × 4 2.7 3.7 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
320:20:8
5 CU
1400 MHz 896 FP6 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 4450U[163] May 7, 2020 4 (8) 2.5
Ryzen 5 4500U[164][165] March 16, 2020 6 (6) 2 × 3 2.3 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152
Ryzen 5 4600U[166] 6 (12) 2.1
Ryzen 5 PRO 4650U[167] May 7, 2020
Ryzen 5 4680U[168] April 13, 2021 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1344
Ryzen 5 4600HS[169] March 16, 2020 3.0 AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1152 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H[170][171] 35–54 W
Ryzen 7 4700U[172] 8 (8) 2 × 4 2.0 4.1 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U[173] May 7, 2020 8 (16) 1.7
Ryzen 7 4800U[174] March 16, 2020 1.8 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792
Ryzen 7 4980U[175] April 13, 2021 2.0 4.4 1950 MHz 1996.8
Ryzen 7 4800HS[176] March 16, 2020 2.9 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 35 W
Ryzen 7 4800H[177][178] 35–54 W
Ryzen 9 4900HS[179] 3 4.3 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792 35 W
Ryzen 9 4900H[180] 3.3 4.4 35–54 W
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Unified shaders : texture mapping units : render output units and compute units (CU)
  3. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Embedded[edit]
Grey Hawk[edit]

In November 2020, AMD announced the V2000 series of embedded Zen 2 Vega APUs.

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Socket Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[i] Clock
(GHz)
Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
V2516[181][182] November 10, 2020[183] TSMC
7FF
6 (12) 2.1 3.95 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB Radeon Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU
1.5 1152 FP6 DDR4-3200
dual-channel

LPDDR4X-4266
quad-channel
10-25 W
V2546[181][182] 3.0 3.95 35-54 W
V2718[181][182] 8 (16) 1.7 4.15 Radeon Vega 7 448:28:8
7 CU
1.6 1433.6 10-25 W
V2748[181][182] 2.9 4.25 35-54 W
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Ryzen 5000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

The desktop Ryzen 5000 series, based on the Zen 3 microarchitecture, was announced on October 8, 2020.[184][185] They use the same 7 nm manufacturing process, which has matured slightly, as usual.[186] Mainstream Ryzen 5000 CPU cores are codenamed Vermeer. Enthusiast/workstation Threadripper 5000 CPU cores were codenamed Genesis, later renamed to Chagall.[citation needed]

Model Release date
and price
Fab Chiplets Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket PCIe
lanes
Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 5600X[187] November 5, 2020
US $299
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
6 (12) 1 × 6 3.7 4.6 32 KB data
32 KB inst.
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
AM4 24 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Performance
Ryzen 7 5800[188] January 12, 2021
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 1 × 8 3.4 4.6 32 KB data
32 KB inst.
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
AM4 24 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 7 5800X[189] November 5, 2020
US $449
3.8 4.7 105 W
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 5900[190] January 12, 2021
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 2 × 6 3.0 4.7 32 KB data
32 KB inst.
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
per CCD
AM4 24 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 5900X[191] November 5, 2020
US $549
3.7 4.8 105 W
Ryzen 9 5950X[192] November 5, 2020
US $799
16 (32) 2 × 8 3.4 4.9
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX.


APUs[edit]

In contrast to their CPU counterparts, the APUs consist of single dies with integrated graphics and smaller caches. The APUs, codenamed Cezanne, forgo PCIe 4.0 support to keep power consumption low.[193]

Desktop[edit]
Model Release date and price Fab CPU GPU Memory support TDP
Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model Config[ii] Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
OEM Retail Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 5300GE[194] 13 April 2021[195] TSMC
7FF
4 (8) 1 × 4 3.6 4.2 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AMD Radeon Graphics 384:24:8
6 CU
1700 MHz 1305.6 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 5350GE[196] 1 June 2021[197]
Ryzen 3 5300G[198] 13 April 2021[195] 4.0 65 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 5350G[199] 1 June 2021[197]
Ryzen 5 5600GE[200] 13 April 2021[195] 6 (12) 1 × 6 3.4 4.4 16 MB 448:28:8
7 CU
1900 MHz 1702.4 35 W
Ryzen 5 PRO 5650GE[201] 1 June 2021[197]
Ryzen 5 5600G[202] 13 April 2021[195] 5 August 2021
US $259[203]
3.9 65 W
Ryzen 5 PRO 5650G[204] 1 June 2021[197]
Ryzen 7 5700GE[205] 13 April 2021[195] 8 (16) 1 × 8 3.2 4.6 512:32:8
8 CU
2000 MHz 2048 35 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 5750GE[206] 1 June 2021[197]
Ryzen 7 5700G[207] 13 April 2021[195] 5 August 2021
US $359[203]
3.8 65 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 5750G[208] 1 June 2021[197]
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Unified shaders : texture mapping units : render output units and compute units (CU)
  3. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.
Mobile[edit]

Oddly numbered models like the 5300U, 5500U and 5700U are Zen 2 based (codename Lucienne), while 5400U, 5600U and 5800U are Zen 3 based (codename Cezanne). HX models are unlocked, allowing them to be overclocked like Intel Core i9-xxxxxHK processors. SMT is now standard across the lineup unlike the 4000-series Ryzen Mobile.

Model Release
date
Fab Architecture CPU GPU Socket PCIe
lanes
Memory support TDP
Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Model,
config[ii]
Clock rate (GHz) Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 5300U[209] January 12, 2021 TSMC
7FF
Zen 2 4 (8) 1 × 4 2.6 3.8 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB RX Vega (6 CU) 1.5 1152 FP6 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 5400U[210] Zen 3 4.0 8 MB 1.6 1228.8
Ryzen 5 5500U[211] Zen 2 6 (12) 2 × 3 2.1 RX Vega (7 CU) 1.8 1612.8
Ryzen 5 5600U[212] Zen 3 1 × 6 2.3 4.2 16 MB
Ryzen 5 5600H[213] 3.3 35–54 W
Ryzen 5 5600HS[214] 3.0
Ryzen 7 5700U[215] Zen 2 8 (16) 2 × 4 1.8 4.3 8 MB RX Vega (8 CU) 1.9 1945.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 5800U[216] Zen 3 1 × 8 1.9 4.4 16 MB 2.0 2048
Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U[217] March 16, 2021 1.9 15 W
Ryzen 7 5800H[218] January 12, 2021 3.2 35–54 W
Ryzen 7 5800HS[219] 2.8
Ryzen 9 5900HS[220] 3.0 4.6 2.1 2150.4
Ryzen 9 5900HX[221] 3.3
Ryzen 9 5980HS[222] 3.0 4.8
Ryzen 9 5980HX[223] 3.3
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Core configuration: 64 ALU (Unified shaders), 4 TMU, 1 ROP per 1 CU
  3. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Initial reception[edit]

The first Ryzen 7 (1700, 1700X, and 1800X) processors debuted in early March 2017 and were generally well received by hardware reviewers.[224][225][226] Ryzen was the first brand new architecture from AMD in five years, and without very much initial fine-tuning or optimization, it ran generally well for reviewers.[227] Initial Ryzen chips ran well with software and games already on the market, performing exceptionally well in workstation scenarios, and well in most gaming scenarios. Compared to Piledriver-powered FX chips, Zen-powered Ryzen chips ran cooler, much faster, and used less power. IPC uplift was eventually gauged to be 52% higher than Excavator, which was two full generations ahead of the architecture still being used in AMD's FX-series desktop predecessors like the FX-8350 and FX-8370.[1] Though Zen fell short of Intel's Kaby Lake in terms of IPC, and therefore single-threaded throughput, it compensated by offering more cores to applications that can use them. Power consumption and heat emission were found to be competitive with Intel, and the included Wraith coolers were generally competitive with higher-priced aftermarket units.

Ryzen 1800X's multi-threaded performance, in some cases while using Blender or other open-source software, was around four times the performance of the FX-8370, or nearly double that of the i7 7700K.[228] One reviewer found that Ryzen chips would usually outperform competing Intel i7 processors for a fraction of the price when all eight cores are used.[228]

However, one complaint among a subset of reviewers was that Ryzen processors lagged their Intel counterparts when running older games, or some newer games at mainstream resolutions such as 720p or 1080p.[229] AMD acknowledged the gaming performance deficit at low resolutions during a Reddit "Ask Me Anything" thread, where it explained that updates and patches were being developed.[230] Subsequent updates to Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Rise of the Tomb Raider increased frame rates by 17–31% on Ryzen systems.[231][232] In April 2017, developer id Software announced that, in the future, its games would exploit the greater parallelism available on Ryzen CPUs.[233]

It has been suggested that low threaded applications often result in Ryzen processors being underused, yielding lower than expected benchmark scores, because Zen relies on its core count to make up for its lower IPC rating than that of Kaby Lake.[234][235][236] However, AMD and others have argued thread scheduling is not the fundamental issue to Windows 10 performance.[237][238] Early AM4 motherboards were also hindered by BIOS bugs and poor DDR4 memory support.[citation needed]

Operating system support[edit]

Windows[edit]

AMD verified that computers with Ryzen CPUs can boot Windows 7 and Windows 8 both 64- and 32-bit but on newer hardware, including AMD Ryzen and Intel Kaby Lake and later, Microsoft only officially supports the use of Windows 10. Windows Update blocks updates from being installed on newer systems running older versions of Windows, though that restriction can be circumvented with an unofficial patch.[239]

Although AMD initially announced that Ryzen chipset drivers would not be provided for Windows 7,[240] its chipset driver packages do in fact list and include them.[241]

As of June 2021, 1st Generation Ryzen CPUs, (including the newer Zen+ "AF" version) are not supported on Windows 11.[242][243]

Linux[edit]

Full support for Ryzen processors' performance features in Linux requires kernel version 4.10 or newer.[244]

Known issues[edit]

Spectre[edit]

Like nearly all modern high performance microprocessors, Ryzen was susceptible to the "Spectre" vulnerabilities. The vulnerabilities can be mitigated without hardware changes via microcode updates and operating system workarounds, but the mitigations incur a performance penalty.[245] AMD Ryzen and Epyc suffer up to 9% penalty from the mitigations, depending on workload, comparing favorably with a penalty of in some cases more than 50% for Intel Core and Xeon processors,[246][247] in part as a result of the AMD processors not requiring mitigation against the related Meltdown vulnerability.[248]

Launched in 2019, Zen 2 includes hardware mitigations against the Spectre V4 speculative store bypass vulnerability.[110][249]

Segmentation fault[edit]

Some early shipments of Ryzen 1000 series processors produced segmentation faults on some workloads on Linux, especially while compiling code with GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).[250] AMD offered to replace the affected processors with newer ones that are unaffected by the problem.[251]

Alleged issues by CTS Labs[edit]

In early 2018, Israeli computer security consultancy firm CTS Labs stated that they had discovered several major flaws in the Ryzen components ecosystem,[252] publicly disclosing them after giving AMD 24 hours to respond and raising concerns and questions regarding their legitimacy,[253][254] though they were later confirmed by two separate security firms.[255] AMD has since stated that while the flaws are real and will be fixed via microcode updates, their severity was overstated as physical access to the hardware is required to exploit the flaws.[256]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Cutress, Ian. "AMD Launches Ryzen: 52% More IPC, Eight Cores for Under $330, Pre-order Today, On Sale March 2nd". AnandTech.
  2. ^ "Zen 2 - Microarchitectures - AMD". Wikichip.com. June 14, 2020.
  3. ^ "A long look at AMD's Zen 3 core and chips". SemiAccurate.com. February 1, 2021.
  4. ^ https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-9-3950x
  5. ^ https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-9-5950x
  6. ^ https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-threadripper-3990x
  7. ^ Cutress, Ian (December 13, 2016). "AMD Gives More Zen Details: Ryzen, 3.4 GHz+, NVMe, Neural Net Prediction, & 25 MHz Boost Steps". AnandTech.
  8. ^ "AMD Takes Computing to a New Horizon with Ryzen Processors". Amd.com. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  9. ^ "New Horizon". Amd.com.
  10. ^ Cutress, Ian. "The AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen Deep Dive: The 2700X, 2700, 2600X, and 2600 Tested". www.anandtech.com. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  11. ^ Cutress, Ian. "The AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen Deep Dive: The 2700X, 2700, 2600X, and 2600 Tested". AnandTech. Retrieved December 11, 2019.
  12. ^ Cutress, Ian. "AMD Ryzen 2nd Gen Details: Four CPUs, Pre-Order Today, Reviews on the 19th". Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  13. ^ before, Pretty sure you've seen this 4GHz logo. "AMD Ryzen 5000 IPC Performance Tested". TechSpot. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  14. ^ Loeffler, John (June 16, 2020). "New AMD Ryzen 3000 XT processors are coming one year after the originals". TechRadar. Future US. Retrieved February 6, 2021.
  15. ^ November 2020, Paul Alcorn 26 (November 26, 2020). "AMD Ryzen 9 5950X and 5900X Review: Zen 3 Breaks the 5 GHz Barrier". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  16. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuiO6rqYV4o
  17. ^ Funk, Ben (January 29, 2021). "Maximizing Ryzen 5000 Performance With AMD Curve Optimizer". HotHardware. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  18. ^ Warren, Tom (November 6, 2020). "AMD has Ryzen up to beat Intel with its new Zen 3 CPUs". The Verge. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  19. ^ "First-Gen AMD Ryzen CPUs are Appearing with 12nm Zen+ Architecture". December 22, 2019.
  20. ^ "The AMD Zen and Ryzen 7 Review: A Deep Dive on 1800X, 1700X and 1700". March 2, 2017.
  21. ^ "Intel's Core 2 Extreme & Core 2 Duo: The Empire Strikes Back". July 14, 2006.
  22. ^ "Devil's Canyon Review: Intel Core i7-4790K and i5-4690K". July 11, 2014.
  23. ^ "The Intel Broadwell Desktop Review: Core i7-5775C and Core i5-5675C Tested (Part 1)". June 2, 2015.
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External links[edit]