ANBO I

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ANBO I
Anbo1.jpg
Role Prototype trainer aircraft
Manufacturer Karo Aviacijos Tiekimo Skyrius
Designer Antanas Gustaitis
First flight 14 July 1925
Retired 1935
Number built 1

The ANBO I was a single-seat aircraft developed in Lithuania, proposed as a trainer for the Army It was a low-wing, braced monoplane of conventional tailwheel configuration. The fuselage structure was of fabric-covered welded steel tube, The wing had a wooden, two-spar structure and was fabric covered but the fuselage, also fabric covered, had a welded steel tube structure.[1]

The first flight took place in 1925. Ten years later the aircraft was sold to Lithuanian Aviation Museum in Kaunas where it is exhibited today.[2][3]

Operators[edit]

 Lithuania

Specifications[edit]

Anbo I 3-view drawing from L'Air January 15, 1926
ANBO I exhibited in the Lithuanian Aviation Museum in Kaunas, Lithuania

Data from Les Ailes, November 1925[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: One
  • Length: 5.75 m (18 ft 10 in)
  • Wingspan: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 11.40 m2 (122.7 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 190 kg (419 lb) equipped
  • Gross weight: 300 kg (661 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 35 kg (77 lb) fuel and oil
  • Powerplant: 1 × Anzani 3-cylinder radial, 30 kW (40 hp)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed Dorand, 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) diameter

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 142 km/h (88 mph, 77 kn) at ground level
  • Endurance: 4 hr
  • Service ceiling: 4,200 m (13,800 ft)
  • Time to altitude: 7 min to 1,000 m (3,300 ft)
  • Take-off distance: 30 m (98 ft)
  • Landing distance: 40 m (130 ft)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Serryer, J. (5 November 1925). "Le monoplan A.Gustaitis". Les Ailes (229): 2–3.
  2. ^ "Latvian Air Force Museum, - ANBO I". Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 12 May 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  3. ^ Ogden, Bob (2009). Aviation Museums and Collections of Mainland Europe. Air Britain (Historians) Ltd. p. 357. ISBN 978 0 85130 418 2.

Further reading[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions.