A Chrysanthemum Bursts in Cincoesquinas

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Un crisantemo estalla en cinco esquinas
Crisantemoestalla.jpg
Theatrical release Poster
Directed by Daniel Burman
Produced by Diego Dubcovsky
Screenplay by Daniel Burman
Story by Daniel Burman
Diego Dubcovsky
Starring José Luis Alfonzo
Pastora Vega
Martin Kalwill
Music by Antonio Tarrago Ros
Cinematography Esteban Sapir
Edited by Verónica Chen
Distributed by BD Cine
Release dates
  • November 1, 1998 (1998-11-01) (Germany)
  • May 7, 1998 (1998-05-07) (Argentina)
Running time
83 minutes
Country Argentina
Brazil
France
Spain
Language Spanish

Un crisantemo estalla en cinco esquinas (English: A Chrysanthemum Bursts in Cincoesquinas) is a 1998 Argentine, Brazilian, French, and Spanish comedy drama film written and directed by Daniel Burman, in feature film debut. It was produced by Diego Dubcovsky. It stars José Luis Alfonzo, Pastora Vega and Martin Kalwill, among others.

Film critic Anthony Kaufman, writing for indieWIRE, an online community of independent filmmakers and aficionados, said Burman's A Chrysanthemum Burst in Cincoesquinas (1998) has been cited as the beginning of the "New Argentine Cinema" wave.[1]

Synopsis[edit]

The story takes place in South America at the turn of the 20th Century. As a child, Erasmo was left with a nurse by his parents, who had to escape a waging civil war. Erasmo is now a grown man. He has lost his parents, and now his foster mother is brutally murdered. He seeks to avenge her death, and the culprit is the landowner and head of state, El Zancudo. Erasmo befriends a poor Jew named Saul, who is prepared to help him in his undertaking. Along the way, Erasmo finds allies, adversaries, love, and then Magdalena.

Cast[edit]

Distribution[edit]

The film was first presented at the Berlin International Film Festival on February 11, 1998. It opened in Argentina on May 7, 1998. It screened at the Muestra de Cine Argentino en Medellín, Colombia.

Awards[edit]

Wins

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kaufman, Anthony. indieWIRE, "Argentina's Next Wave Struggle Sustains Momentum Amid Economic Collapse," March 20, 2002.

External links[edit]