A Pagan Place (novel)

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A Pagan Place
"A Pagan Place, Cover, Edna O'Brien.jpg".jpg
First edition
AuthorEdna O'Brien
CountryIreland
LanguageEnglish
PublisherWeidenfeld & Nicolson
Publication date
April 16, 1970
Media typePrint
Pages223 pages
ISBN0-297-00027-6

A Pagan Place is a 1970 novel by Irish writer Edna O'Brien.[1][2] The book was first published on April 16, 1970, by Weidenfeld & Nicolson and follows a young girl in the 1930s and 1940s. In 1972 A Pagan Place was adapted into a stage production,[3] which received mixed reviews.[4]

Style[edit]

A Pagan Place is narrated in second person in its entirety. As Shahriyar Mansouri argues, such a "melodic" narratorial voice, presented through the mouthpiece of second-person narrator signifies a lost sense of identity and independence for the post-independence Irish women.[5] The only occasion when the narratorial voice appropriates the first person pronoun 'I', indicating its presence and self-recognition, comes at the end of the novel, where the unnamed, young female protagonist embarks on her journey of formation.

Reception[edit]

The Sydney Morning Herald praised the book's narrative, saying that it "flows along absorbingly without a line of direct dialogue".[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ungerer, Miriam (Apr 19, 1970). "Story of Herself". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 6 January 2013.
  2. ^ Herman, David (Fall 1994). "Textual 'You' and double deixis in Edna O'Brien's 'A Pagan Place.'". Style. 28 (3): 378.
  3. ^ Barnes, Clive (January 31, 1974). "Stage: Edna O'Brien's 'Pagan Place'; Play About a Girlhood in Ireland Opens The Cast American Premiere Is Given in New Haven". New York Times. Retrieved 6 January 2013.
  4. ^ Hobson, Harold (Nov 10, 1972). "London's 'best new play in a long time'". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 6 January 2013.
  5. ^ Mansouri, Shahriyar (2013). "Against the Oedipal Politics of Formation in Edna O'Brien's A Pagan Place: 'Women do not Count, Neither Shall they be Counted'". Studi irlandesi. A Journal of Irish Studies. 3 (3): 335–354.
  6. ^ Curtin, Lorna (Dec 4, 1970). "Pagan Place By Edna O'brien". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 6 January 2013.