A Soldier's Sweetheart

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A Soldier's Sweetheart
A Soldier's Sweetheart (1998) Film Poster.jpg
Film Poster
Directed by Thomas Michael Donnelly
Produced by William S. Gilmore
Marianne Moloney (Exec.)
Written by Tim O'Brien
Thomas Michael Donnelly
Starring Kiefer Sutherland
Skeet Ulrich
Georgina Cates
Music by Gary Chang
Cinematography Jacek Laskus
Edited by Anthony Sherin
Production
company
Showtime Networks
Moloney/Donnelly Productions
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Showtime Networks
Release date
  • June 9, 1998 (1998-06-09) (Seattle International Film Festival)
Running time
112 minutes
Language English

A Soldier's Sweetheart is a 1998 movie starring Kiefer Sutherland,[1] Skeet Ulrich, and Georgina Cates. It is based on a short story by Tim O'Brien, "Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong."[2] The story was part of his award winning book, The Things They Carried.

Cast[edit]

Release[edit]

The film is only available on VHS, and a petition has been set up at IMDb urging the companies that own the rights to the film to consider reissuing it in DVD format.[3] It was also premiered at the Seattle International Film Festival in 1998. The film received a theatrical release in Belgium in 2010.

Reception[edit]

Bob Batz from Dayton Daily News gave A Soldier's Sweetheart a very positive review, stating: "The film, based on Tim O'Brien's award-winning short story Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong, is a brutal, often bloody story of the Vietnam War and how it changed many of the men - and women - who were part of it. It is filled with excellent dialogue and has enough plot twists to keep viewers riveted to their easy chairs for the entire two hours."[4] Ken Eisner from Variety magazine also gave the film a good review, concluding: "Just when you think all the basic Vietnam stories have been told, helmer Thomas Michael Donnelly puts a new spin on America’s lost cause by viewing it from a female angle. Striving for mythic levels — although there’s plenty of scary grit to it — “A Soldier’s Sweetheart” taps into an aspect of warfare that transcends gender. Subject, then, is a difficult one, but extremely well-mounted pic could resonate with women if Paramount can find a way to package it for theatrical release".[5]

A Soldier's Sweetheart was nominated for two awards. One Primetime Emmy Awards for "Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special"[6] and one Golden Reel Awards for "Best Sound Editing - Television Movies of the Week - Dialogue & ADR".[7] On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes the film currently holds 90% of audience approvation.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A second Sutherland goes to war" - Toronto Star
  2. ^ "A `SOLDIER'S'STORY MAKES FOR A GREAT CABLE MOVIE" - Dayton Daily News
  3. ^ "A Soldier's Sweetheart (1998) for DVD Release" - Petition Online Archived July 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ Batz, Bob. "A `SOLDIER'S' STORY MAKES FOR A GREAT CABLE MOVIE". Dayton Daily News. Retrieved 17 May 2017. 
  5. ^ Eisner, Ken. "Review: ‘A Soldier’s Sweetheart’". Variety. Retrieved 17 May 2017. 
  6. ^ "51st Emmy Awards Nominees and Winners". Emmys.com. Retrieved 17 May 2017. 
  7. ^ "Awards". IMDB. Retrieved 17 May 2017. 
  8. ^ "A Soldier's Sweetheart". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 17 May 2017. 

External links[edit]

See also[edit]