Page protected with pending changes level 1

Aamir Liaquat Hussain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Aamir Liaquat Hussain
Member of the National Assembly of Pakistan
Assumed office
13 August 2018
Constituency NA-245 (Karachi East-IV)
In office
21 November 2002 – 5 July 2007
Constituency NA-249 (Karachi-XI)
Minister of State for Religious Affairs
In office
5 September 2004 – 5 July 2007
President Pervez Musharraf
Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz
Personal details
Born (1971-07-05) 5 July 1971 (age 47)
Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan
Nationality Pakistani
Political party Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (2018 – )
Muttahida Qaumi Movement (2002 – 2016)
Spouse(s) Syeda Bushra Aamir
Syeda Tuba Anwar (m. 2018)
[1]
Children 2[2]
Parents Sheikh Liaquat
Residence Karachi
Occupation TV show host
Website AamirLiaquat.com

Aamir Liaquat Hussain (Urdu: عامر لیاقت حسین‎; born 5 July 1971) is a controversial Pakistani television host and politician who has been a member of the National Assembly of Pakistan since August 2018. Previously he was a member of the National Assembly from 2002 to 2007 and served as the Minister of State for Religious Affairs from 2004 to 2007 in the federal cabinet of Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz.

Early life and education[edit]

Hussain was born on 5 July 1971 in Karachi[3] to politician Sheikh Liaquat Hussain[4] and columnist Mahmooda Sultana.[5]

In an interview, Hussain said he received his Bachelor's of Arts (BA) degree in Islamic Studies in 1995, and Doctor of Philosophy (Phd) in Islamic Studies in 2002 by a now known degree mill, Trinity College and University (based in Spain but incorporated in Dover, Delaware).[6] He also claim to hold a degree of Master of Arts in Islamic Studies in 2002 from the Trinity College and University.[7]

In 2006, the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan declared the BA degree in Islamic Studies of Hussain obtained from the Trinity College and University as not recognised and fake.[8] In 2003, The Guardian reported this University as a scam where one could buy a degree as cheaply as £150 within 28 days[9]. The University of Karachi declared his BA degree as fake earlier in 2005. Hussain declared his BA degree to the election commission of Pakistan while filing his nomination forms for 2002 Pakistani general elections.[8] It was reported that Hussain had purchased his degrees from the Trinity College and University to become eligible for contesting the elections.[6] In 2002, it was made compulsory for contestants of elections for seats in the Provincial and National Assembly of Pakistan to hold at least a bachelor's degree.[10]

Hussain's claim to receive an MBBS degree from Liaquat Medical College Jamshoro in 1995[6] was also falsified based on the fact that if he had a MBBS degree in 1995 he would not need any fake bachelors, masters and doctorate degrees to contest the 2002 general elections. It was also noted that one cannot pursue two different faculties at a same time since Hussain claim to have both his MBBS degree in 1995 and BA in Islamic Studies from Trinity College in 1995.[11]

In 2012, it was reported that Hussain appeared as candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Karachi from where graduated in 2008. He was later enrolled in Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science & Technology in 2010 from where received his master's degree in Islamic studies but according to official at Federal Urdu University, Hussain never attended class or appeared in exams.[5] They officials said that the admission form of Hussain was initially submitted with the photograph of another person and was later replaced with the photograph of Hussain. It was also reported that Hussain not himself appeared in the semester exams.[12]

In 2015, it was reported that Hussain acquired fake degree from Ashwood University. According to Federal Investigation Agency, his profile was noted in Axact's main server. Hussain confessed that he purchased fake degree from Ashwood University for $1136.[13][14]

Political career[edit]

Hussain was elected as the Member of the National Assembly of Pakistan for the first time in Pakistani general election, 2002 on the ticket of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement from NA-249 (Karachi-XI) constituency and was appointed as the minister of state for Religious affairs[5] and Zakat and Ushar Division in September 2004 in Shaukat Aziz cabinet.[3][15] As the junior minister of Religious Affairs, Hussain asked religious scholars from Pakistan to issue a 'Fatwa' regarding suicide bombings in May 2005.[16] In June 2005 he was attacked by enraged youths during his visit to Jamia Binoria. Police however denied that any incident of manhandling of Hussain had taken place and said that the crowd only chanted slogans.[17][18] Hussain was the minister of state for Religious Affairs until July 2007, when his party asked him to resign from his position as Minister of State for Religious Affairs and from his seat as a member of the National Assembly.[19][5] According to an official statement, the party was unhappy with the statements made by Hussain against Salman Rushdie.[20] In 2007, he resigned from politics.[21] Later in 2008, MQM also expelled him from the party.[22]

He is the founder of Memhooda Sultana Foundation.[23] From 2013 to 2015, an annual publication The 500 Most Influential Muslims by Royal Islamic Strategic Studies Centre in Jordan included Hussain in their list.[21][24] In August 2016, after the attack on media houses by MQM workers and the arrest of MQM leaders, Hussain was also taken into custody by Sindh Rangers.[25] In February 2017, an Anti-Terrorism Court in Pakistan instructed the authorities to put the name of Hussain on the Exit Control List, after Hussain was charged with facilitation of hate speech but police failed to produce the Hussain in court hearings.[26]

Hussain joined Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) in March 2018.[27]

He was re-elected to the National Assembly as a candidate of PTI from Constituency NA-245 (Karachi East-IV) in Pakistani general election, 2018.[28]

TV career[edit]

Hussain was a radio broadcaster on FM101.[6] He is also known for hosting Ramadan transmissions; for Suhur and Iftar, for many years.[29][23] He started his television career from Pakistan Television Corporation but was fired shortly.[6] He joined Geo TV as founding member in 2001 where he hosted religious program Aalim Online.[23] In 2010, Hussain left Geo TV[29][5][30] and joined ARY Digital Network as Managing Director of ARY Qtv and as Executive Director of ARY Digital. He hosted religious program Aalim Aur Aalam there.[31] He then hosted Pehchan Ramazan in 2012,[32] after rejoining Geo TV,[5] and Amaan Ramazan in 2013.[33][34] In January 2014, he became the vice president of Geo TV, and hosted game show Inaam Ghar.[23][35]

In June 2014, he joined Express Media Group as president[36] and Group Editor of religious content on Daily Express,[23] and hosted Pakistan Ramazan.[37][38] Hussain then rejoined Geo TV and hosted Subh-e-Pakistan from November 2014,[39] and also became president of Geo Entertainment in November 2015.[29] He then joined BOL media group in 2016, and started hosting current affairs talk show Aisay Nahi Chalay Ga. There, he hosted Ramazan Mein BOL in 2017,[40] during which he also started hosting a game show; Game Show Aisay Chalay Ga.[41][42] He left BOL in November 2017.[43][44] In 2016, it was reported that Hussain would make Pakistani film debut in an upcoming film of Syed Noor, alongside Saima Noor as lead cast.[45]

Controversies[edit]

In 2008, Hussain in his TV special Khatmay Nabuwat criticised the Ahmadi Community founder, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad Qadyani. The guest scholars in show declared anyone associated with Ahmadi group deserving of murder due to blasphemy.[46][47] Within two days, two prominent Ahmadis were killed, one of them being a physician and another being a community leader.[48][49][50]

In 2010, Hussain in his TV show claimed that the recent losses in cricket matches of Pakistani Cricket team were due to the fact that their new shoe soles were green. With green being the color of Pakistani flag and the Dome of Muhammad's tomb, the green soles were supposedly disrespectful towards Islam, and apparently the team was being divinely punished. Hussain claimed that this was a matter of faith. He was criticised for his views in the press.[51][52][53]

In 2011, a compilation of behind-the-scenes[31] footage videos were leaked online, showing Hussain using various profanities on the set of his show. In the same video, he is also shown taking a rape related question lightly, mocking his religious guests, spontaneously singing Indian tunes and referring to Bollywood rape scenes.[54][55][56] In his defence, Hussain accused the Geo TV, of creating the alleged fake video in order to tarnish his credibility, and stated that the video must have been edited and dubbed by "masters of synchronization". However, The New York Times reported that Hussain himself said "It was my lighter side".[57]

In 2013, Hussain was criticised for giving out abandoned infants to parents who wanted to adopt babies in Amaan Ramazan transmission.[58][59] The parents were chosen after background checks were done by the Chhipa association beforehand, and then the baby was handed over to them during the show.[60] Child welfare advocates expressed concern that the lack of confidentiality could expose the children and their families to teasing and stigma in the future.[61]

In 2014, a religious cleric in a TV show hosted by Hussain declared Ahmadis the enemies of Islam and Hussain responded by nodding his head in affirmation while the audience burst into applause. The guest cleric went on to use further derogatory language against the Ahmadis for some minutes while the TV show host clapped in appreciation[62] Within five days of the show, an Ahmadi man, Luqman Ahmad Shehzad, was gunned down in Gujranwala.[63] This was the second time that Hussain's show had been linked to attacks on Ahmadis.[64]

In June 2016, Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) barred Hussain from hosting his Ramadan show Inaam Ghar for three days on Geo Entertainment, which showed a reenactment by the show's host of a girl committing suicide.[65][66]

In January 2017, a social activist and lawyer Jibran Nasir filed a complaint with PEMRA alleging Hussain of running a "malicious, defamatory and life endangering campaign" against him.[67][68] The same month, Hussain also claimed that the Om Puri was murdered.[69] Following which the PEMRA banned Hussain and his programme Aisay Nahi Chalay Ga on BOL News for preaching hate.[70][71]

In March 2017, Amnesty International slammed the Government of Pakistan for not taking action against Hussain for endangering the lives of journalists, and bloggers, and social activists and urged Interior Minister of Pakistani Nisar Ali Khan to take immediate steps.[72] Later in the month, PEMRA issued a notification against Hussain, directing him to apologise on air to the viewers for hate speech.[73][74]

On 12 December 2017, it was announced that Hussain will be returning to television through 24 News HD, however, on 13 December, he was banned by PEMRA from all forms of media over hate speech allegations.[75][76] The ban was lifted by the Supreme Court on 7 February 2018.[77]

On 26 May 2018, PEMRA again banned Hussain after creating controversy related to religious organization Jamiat Ahle Hadith and Zakir Naik.[78]

Personal life[edit]

Hussain has married twice. He has two children from his first wife, Syeda Bushra Aamir.[79] He married to his second wife, Syeda Tuba Anwar in 2018.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Poll drive: Aamir Liaquat admits second marriage". www.pakistantoday.com.pk. 
  2. ^ a b "Aamir Liauqat caught in second marriage controversy ahead of polls". 
  3. ^ a b "Educational background of state ministers". DAWN. 6 September 2004. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  4. ^ "Dr Aamir Liaquat resigns". DAWN. 5 July 2007. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Dr Amir Liaquat returns to Geo screen on public demand". The News. 7 July 2012. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "My degrees are not fake". DAWN. 1 May 2005. Archived from the original on 21 October 2007. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  7. ^ M.A. Siddiqui "Musharraf's Blue Eyed Religious Affairs Minister Turns Out to be Dr. Fake" Archived 15 December 2012 at the Wayback Machine. South Asia Tribune. ISSN 1684-2057. Retrieved 6 March 2012
  8. ^ a b "Degree of Amir Liaquat not recognised". DAWN. 14 June 2006. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  9. ^ Garrett, Alexander (26 October 2003). "Get a doctorate in 28 days". The Observer. Archived from the original on 10 December 2017. Retrieved 9 December 2017. 
  10. ^ "Fake degree scandal roils Pakistani politics". DAWN. 30 June 2010. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 15 August 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2014. 
  12. ^ "Will the real Amir Liaquat please stand up?". The Express Tribune. 17 February 2012. Archived from the original on 16 August 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  13. ^ "Aamir Liaquat allegedly confesses obtaining fake degree". ARY News. 6 June 2015. Archived from the original on 7 September 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  14. ^ Cheema, Umar (22 January 2018). "More than 1,100 Pakistanis paid for Axact degrees". The News International. Archived from the original on 23 January 2018. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  15. ^ "Portfolios of ministers of state". DAWN. 5 September 2004. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 29 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Suicide attacks are haram, clerics decree". Daily Times. 18 May 2005. Archived from the original on 16 December 2005. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  17. ^ Minister mobbed, manhandled Archived 1 July 2012 at Archive.is. DAWN. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  18. ^ "PM concerned over attack on minister". DAWN. 26 June 2005. Archived from the original on 21 January 2013. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  19. ^ "Amir Liaquat resigns as minister; quits assembly". The News. 5 July 2007. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 29 January 2017. 
  20. ^ "Dr Aamir Liaquat resigns". DAWN. 5 July 2007. Archived from the original on 10 March 2014. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  21. ^ a b "For the third time: Aamir Liaquat among 500 influential Muslims". The Express Tribune. 4 October 2015. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  22. ^ "MQM expels Aamir Liaquat". DAWN. 11 September 2008. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  23. ^ a b c d e "Dr Aamir Liaquat Hussain joins Express". The Express Tribune. 21 June 2014. Archived from the original on 21 June 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  24. ^ "Dr Amir Liaquat included among 500 most influential Muslim personalities". The News. 29 November 2013. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  25. ^ "Aamir Liaquat detained". Samaa TV. 22 August 2016. Archived from the original on 23 August 2016. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  26. ^ "Farooq Sattar, Amir Liaquat should be put on Exit Control List, suggests ATC". DAWN. 27 February 2017. Archived from the original on 27 February 2017. Retrieved 27 February 2017. 
  27. ^ "Imran Khan welcomes Amir Liaquat Hussain into PTI". DAWN.COM. 19 March 2018. Retrieved 19 March 2018. 
  28. ^ "Twitterati 'saddened' as Amir Liaquat reportedly wins from NA-245". www.pakistantoday.com.pk. Retrieved 3 August 2018. 
  29. ^ a b c "Media superstar Dr Amir Liaquat becomes Geo Entertainment president". The News. 3 November 2015. Archived from the original on 1 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  30. ^ "Renowned TV anchor Amir Liaquat leaves Bol TV". Daily Pakistan. Archived from the original on 15 August 2017. Retrieved 16 August 2017. 
  31. ^ a b "Saint or Hypocrite? Technology Can Confirm the Real Aamir Liaquat". Newsline. 17 August 2011. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  32. ^ "'Pehchan Ramazan' breaks all records of popularity". The News. 21 June 2015. Archived from the original on 21 June 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  33. ^ "Aamir Liaquat presented Ramazan as symbol of peace: CNN". The News. 2 August 2013. Archived from the original on 26 December 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  34. ^ "Abandoned babies given away on Pakistani TV programme". BBC News. 2 August 2013. Archived from the original on 5 May 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  35. ^ "Geo's exciting family show 'Inaam Ghar' kicks off tonight". The News. 18 January 2014. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  36. ^ "Supporting military: Ramazan transmission dedicated to army". The Express Tribune. 21 June 2014. Archived from the original on 20 July 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  37. ^ "Supporting military: Ramazan transmission dedicated to army". The Express Tribune. 17 July 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  38. ^ "Dr Aamir urges govt to ensure Dr Aafia's release". The Express Tribune. 8 July 2014. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  39. ^ "Geo TV's morning show 'Subhe Pakistan' launches today". The News. 19 November 2014. Retrieved 8 July 2017. 
  40. ^ Dawood Rehman (12 May 2017). "Game On! Aamir Liaqat claims his Ramzan show will offer 3 Airplanes as prizes". Daily Pakistan. Archived from the original on 12 May 2017. Retrieved 19 May 2017. 
  41. ^ "Meera's cringeworthy exchange sends the wrong message about daughters-in-law". DAWN Images. 12 June 2017. Archived from the original on 15 June 2017. Retrieved 8 July 2017. 
  42. ^ Eeshah Omer (22 June 2017). "Nadia Khan and Sanam Baloch take jabs at Aamir Liaquat!". Daily Pakistan. Archived from the original on 22 June 2017. Retrieved 8 July 2017. 
  43. ^ "Aamir Liaquat leaves Bol TV citing monetary dispute". DAWN. 18 November 2017. Archived from the original on 19 November 2017. Retrieved 19 November 2017. 
  44. ^ "BOL's response to Dr. Aamir Liaquat Hussain's Resignation via Twitter". BOL. 18 November 2017. Archived from the original on 19 November 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2017. 
  45. ^ "Did you know? Aamir Liaquat is set to be a movie star". DAWN Images. 2 January 2016. Archived from the original on 19 October 2016. 
  46. ^ Azhar, Mobeen (13 July 2012). "The rise of Pakistan's televangelists". BBC World Service. Archived from the original on 17 July 2012. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  47. ^ "Is Pakistan's TV evangelism sprouting a dangerous creed of intolerance?". Al Arabia News. 15 July 2012. Archived from the original on 18 July 2012. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  48. ^ "Pakistan: Two persons murdered after an anchor person proposed the widespread lynching of Ahmadi sect followers". Asian Human Rights Commission. Archived from the original on 3 June 2011. 
  49. ^ Idris, Kunwar. "Not in the name of faith". DAWN. Archived from the original on 28 November 2012. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  50. ^ Azhar, Mobeen (6 July 2012). "Shades of bigotry". DAWN. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  51. ^ Paracha, Nadeem (4 February 2010). "Evergreen logic". DAWN. Archived from the original on 29 December 2016. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  52. ^ "TV host sees red; blames green soles for Pak defeat". Mumbaimirror.com. 1 February 2010. Archived from the original on 29 January 2013. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  53. ^ "Pak cricket team's drubbing blamed on green colour of soles". The Times of India. 31 January 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  54. ^ Chaudhry, Kashif (17 August 2011). "Saint or Hypocrite? Technology Can Confirm the Real Aamir Liaquat". newslinemagazine.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  55. ^ Ahmed, Akbar S. and Hassan, Leena. Dishonourable Conduct: A Summary of the Infamous Aamir Liaquat Video Archived 19 November 2011 at the Wayback Machine. Newsline. Retrieved 1 March 2012
  56. ^ Fulton, George. Delusion, denial and 'Dr' Liaquat Archived 21 May 2012 at the Wayback Machine. The Express Tribune. 17 August 2011. Retrieved 27 April 2012
  57. ^ Walsh, Declan (31 August 2012). "A Star Televangelist in Pakistan Divides, Then Repents". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2 January 2013. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  58. ^ "Pakistani TV Game Show Awards Contestants Abandoned Babies As Prizes During Ramadan Ratings Wars". IBT. 25 July 2013. Archived from the original on 24 December 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  59. ^ ""People love me", says Amir Liaquat Hussain". DAWN. 2 August 2013. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  60. ^ "Aamir Liaquat presented Ramazan as symbol of peace: CNN". The News. 2 August 2013. Archived from the original on 2 January 2014. 
  61. ^ "Abandoned babies given away on Pakistani TV programme". BBC News. 2 August 2013. Archived from the original on 5 May 2017. 
  62. ^ "Geo apologises for hate speech against Ahmadis in Amir Liaquat's show". DAWN. Archived from the original on 5 January 2015. 
  63. ^ "Man from Ahmadi religious minority killed in Pakistan after Muslim leader calls them "enemy"". Reuters. 28 December 2014. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2014. 
  64. ^ "Ahmadi Farmer Gunned Down in Gujranwala". Newsweek. 28 December 2014. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2014. 
  65. ^ Khan, Raza (28 June 2016). "Pemra bans Aamir Liaquat's show Inam Ghar for three days". DAWN. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  66. ^ "PEMRA bans Aamir Liaquat's 'Inam Ghar' for three days". Pakistan Today. 27 June 2016. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  67. ^ "Lawyer moves Pemra against TV host for making blasphemy allegations". DAWN. 21 January 2017. Archived from the original on 25 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  68. ^ "Jibran Nasir moves PEMRA against Amir Liaquat over blasphemy allegations". The Express Tribune. 21 January 2017. Archived from the original on 23 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  69. ^ "Pakistani Journalist Goes Nuts, Says PM Modi, Ajit Doval Are Behind Om Puri's Death". indiatimes.com. 9 January 2017. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  70. ^ "Pemra bans Amir Liaquat's 'Aisay Nahi Chalay Ga' on Bol News". DAWN. 26 January 2017. Archived from the original on 26 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  71. ^ "PEMRA bans Amir Liaquat over hate speech". The Express Tribune. 26 January 2017. Archived from the original on 26 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  72. ^ "Amnesty Intl slams Pak govt for inaction on hateful content aired on TV". DAWN. 1 March 2017. Archived from the original on 1 March 2017. Retrieved 1 March 2017. 
  73. ^ "Pemra tells Amir Liaquat to apologise on air for 'hate speech'". DAWN. 28 March 2017. Archived from the original on 28 March 2017. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  74. ^ "Pakistan TV's Aamir Liaquat Hussain must apologise for 'hate speech'". BBC News. 28 March 2017. Archived from the original on 28 March 2017. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  75. ^ "IHC bars Aamir Liaqat from making TV appearances over hate speech allegations". Pakistan Today. 13 December 2017. Archived from the original on 15 December 2017. Retrieved 13 December 2017. 
  76. ^ Imran, Mohammad (13 December 2017). "Islamabad High Court bars Amir Liaquat from appearing on TV till further notice". DAWN. Archived from the original on 14 December 2017. Retrieved 13 December 2017. 
  77. ^ "SC lifts ban on Aamir Liaquat". Pakistan Today. 7 February 2018. Retrieved 8 February 2018. 
  78. ^ Dawn.com (26 May 2018). "Pemra bans Dr Amir Liaquat for 30 days over 'unwarranted drama' on religious matters". 
  79. ^ "Aamir Liaquat's wife rushed to hospital after second marriage scandal surfaces". 

External links[edit]