Aaron Harberts

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Aaron Harberts
Born (1973-01-20) January 20, 1973 (age 45)
Iowa[1]
OccupationWriter/producer
Alma materNorthwestern University
Years active1998 - present
PartnerScott (1996–present)

Aaron Harberts is an American television writer and producer. He was a co-showrunner of CBS's Star Trek: Discovery with Gretchen J. Berg[2][3][4][5] until their departure in June 2018.[6] Harberts and Berg have been writing/producing partners since they met as students at Northwestern University.[2]

Career[edit]

Harberts and Berg's first staff writing job was on the ninth season of Beverly Hills, 90210 in 1998.[7] When 90210 finished after its tenth season they were offered a producing role on Roswell which was then starting its second season.[7] At the end of Roswell's production they started work on Wonderfalls where they met Bryan Fuller who would later hire them to work on Pushing Daisies and Star Trek: Discovery.[2] They also wrote for and/or served as executive producers on Mercy, Off the Map, GCB, Revenge and Reign, and created their own series Pepper Dennis.[2][8][9]

In 2001, Harberts and Berg did three rewrites for the 2001 film Valentine which helped to get the film a green light.[1] But at the time they were just starting work on Roswell so were unavailable for further rewrites and other writers took over.[1][10]

Harberts and Berg were initially brought onto the staff of Star Trek: Discovery in 2016 by its creator and initial showrunner Bryan Fuller as executive producers.[2] When Fuller left to concentrate on American Gods and a planned reboot of Amazing Stories, they were offered the chance to take on the showrunner role.[2][11]

Personal life[edit]

Harberts is openly gay and married, having been with his partner Scott since 1996.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Fehrocious (November 19, 2000). "Aaron Harberts and Gretchen J. Berg Interview". Crashdown.com. Retrieved 2018-01-20.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Reynolds, Daniel (January 17, 2018). "How a Non-Trekkie Became One of Star Trek's First Gay Showrunners". Advocate. Retrieved 2018-01-20.
  3. ^ Park, Andrea (September 21, 2017). "Aaron Harberts on leading Star Trek: Discovery". CBS News. Retrieved 2018-01-19.
  4. ^ Rodman, Sarah (September 15, 2017). "Star Trek: Discovery Showrunners on Boldly Going Somewhere New with the Fabled Space Franchise". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2018-01-19.
  5. ^ Miller, Liz Shannon (November 12, 2017). "Star Trek: Discovery Producers Unpack the Midseason Finale, and Why This is the Most Romantic Star Trek Ever". IndieWire. Retrieved 2018-01-19.
  6. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (June 14, 2018). "'Star Trek: Discovery' Showrunners Out; Alex Kurtzman to Take Over (Exclusive)". Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2018-06-15.
  7. ^ a b Holloway, Daniel (August 29, 2017). "Can Star Trek: Discovery Help CBS Boldly Go into a Streaming Future?". Variety. Retrieved 2018-01-20.
  8. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (May 21, 2013). "Gretchen Berg & Aaron Harberts Sign New Overall Deal With ABC Studios, Will Be Executive Producers On ABC's Revenge". Deadline. Retrieved 2018-01-20.
  9. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (May 13, 2011). "Gretchen Berg And Aaron Harberts To Run ABC's Good Christian Belles". Deadline. Retrieved 2018-01-20.
  10. ^ Harris, Dana (March 29, 2000). "Blanks to helm WB romantic horror pic". Variety. Retrieved 2018-01-20.
  11. ^ Littleton, Cynthia; Ryan, Maureen; Birnbaum, Debra (October 26, 2016). "Bryan Fuller Stepping Back from Showrunner Role on Star Trek: Discovery". Variety. Retrieved 2018-01-20.

External links[edit]