Abbot of Tavistock

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Abbot of Tavistock was the title of the abbot of Tavistock Abbey in Devon, England. The name of the first abbot is unknown, but the abbey was founded between 975 and 980.[1] Unless otherwise specified the details in the following table are from Heads of Religious Houses: England & Wales 940–1216.[1]

Name Dates Notes
unknown c.975 First abbot
Ælfmær 994–c1009 Became bishop of Selsey
Lyfing of Winchester c.1009–1027 Became bishop of Worcester
Aldred c. 1027–c. 1043 Became bishop of Worcester
Sihtric c. 1043–1082 Became a pirate
Geoffrey c. 1082–c. 1088
Wimund before 1096–1102 Deposed by the Synod of Westminster in 1102
Osbert ?–before1131
Robert of Plympton c. 1131–1145
?Roger c. 1146
Robert Postel c. 1146–1154
Walter of Winchester[2] c. 1154–c. 1168
Godfrey c. 1168–c. 1173
Baldwin 1174–1184
Herbert 1186–1200
Andrew 1200–1202
Jordan c. 1203–1219/1220
William of Kernit 1220 [2]
John of Rofa 1224 [2]
Alan of Cornwall 1233 Previously prior of Tresco[3]
Robert of Kitecnol 1248 [2]
Thomas 1248 [2]
Henry of Northampton 1257 [2]
Philip Trencheful 1259 [2]
(vacant) 1259 Appointment lapsed to Walter Branscombe, Bishop of Exeter.[4]
Alured 1260 [2]
John Chubbe 1262–1269 Deposed by Bishop Branscombe[5]
Robert Colbern 1270 [2]
Robert Campbell/Champeaux[6] 1285–1325 (died) "Of the abbots in the later monastic period ... probably ... the greatest and wisest"[4]
(vacant) 1325–1328 Dispute between two candidates, Robert Busse and John Courtenay (eldest son of Hugh de Courtenay, 9th Earl of Devon)[6]
Robert(?) Bonus[2][7] 1328—1333 (excommunicated) Bishop Grandisson said of him "That Abbot's name was Good, but he was a scoundrel, a near-heretic!"[8]
John Courtenay[2] 1334 Suspended by Bishop Grandisson for maladministration[9]
Richard Esse 1349 [2]
Stephen Langdon 1362 [2]
Thomas Cullyng 1380 or 1381 The last of five abbots after Campbell who were all accused of waste, extravagance and neglecting their spiritual duties.[4]
John Mey 20 July 1402 [10]
Thomas Mede March 1422 – April 1442 [11]
Thomas Crispyn 11 June 1442 – 5 April 1447 [12]
William Pewe 2 May 1447 – 26 December 1450 [12]
John Dynyngton February 1451 – December 1490 [13]
Richard Yeme February 1491 – c. March 1492 [14]
Richard Banham 1492–1523 [15]
John Peryn 1523–1539 Last abbot[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Knowles, David; Brooke C. N. L.; and London, Vera C. M. The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales 940–1216 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1972 ISBN 0-521-08367-2
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Alexander (1942) p. 198
  3. ^ Alford (1891) p. 123
  4. ^ a b c Alexander (1937) p. 249
  5. ^ Alford (1891) pp. 145–52
  6. ^ a b Hoskins & Finberg (1952) p. 198
  7. ^ Hoskins & Finberg (1952) p. 202
  8. ^ Hoskins & Finberg (1952) p. 206
  9. ^ Hoskins & Finberg (1952) p. 211
  10. ^ Alexander (1937) p. 259
  11. ^ Alexander (1937) pp. 264–5
  12. ^ a b Alexander (1937) p. 270
  13. ^ Alexander (1937) p. 274
  14. ^ Alexander (1937) p. 281
  15. ^ Alexander (1937) p. 183

References[edit]

  • Alexander, J. J. (1937). "Tavistock in the Fifteenth Century". Report & Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 69: 247–285. 
  • Alexander, J. J. (1942). "The Beginnings of Tavistock". Report & Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 74: 173–198. 
  • Alford, Rev. D. P. (1891). The Abbots of Tavistock with Views Beyond. Plymouth: W. Brendon & Son. 
  • Hoskins, W. G.; Finberg, H. P. R. (1952). "The Tragi-Comedy of Abbot Bonus". Devonshire Studies. London: Jonathan Cape.