Abdallah bin Jiluwi

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Abdallah bin Jiluwi bin Turki al Saud
prince Abdallah bin Jiluwi bin Turki bin Abdallah ibn Muhammad Al Saud
Issue
  • Fahd
  • Saud
  • Muhammad
  • Nasir
  • Abd al Aziz
  • Sa'd
  • Abd al Muhsin
  • twenty others
Noble family House of al Saud

Abdallah bin Jiluwi was one of the early Saudi governors and he was one of the bravest

Biography[edit]

Abdullah bin Jiluwi was the grandson of the founder of the Second Saudi State, Turki bin Abdallah. He was a paternal first cousin once removed and a close companion of the young Amir Ibn Saud, founder of the modern Saudi Arabia.[1] He accompanied Ibn Saud in exile to Kuwait after the family's retreat from the capital at Riyadh.[2] Abdullah bin Jiluwi was a principal supporter in the raid on the Masmak Castle on 15 January 1902 which resulted in the recovery of Riyadh.[3] He killed Ajlan, the Rashidi governor, and saved the life of Ibn Saud in the battle for the fortress.[4] In addition, he was Ibn Saud's deputy commander and assisted him in capturing the Eastern Province.[5]

As the Saudi state was founded and consolidated, Abdullah bin Jiluwi was firstly appointed governor of the Qassim province.[6] Then he was transferred to the Eastern province or the Hasa province, name of the region at that period.[7] Because Abdullah bin Jiluwi could not claim to the succession and Ibn Saud's sons were not old enough to assume this responsibility.[8] However, Abdullah was the second powerful member of the Al Sauds during this time after the King himself.[6]

The province was ruled sternly and became almost a semi-independent family fiefdom. Abdullah's son Saud succeeded as governor upon his death in 1938. Saud bin Abdullah served as the governor from 1938 to 1967.[8] Next, his another son Abdul Muhsin bin Abdullah Al Jiluwi served as the governor of the province from 1967 to 1985 until Prince Muhammed bin Fahd replaced him in the post.[8][9]

One of his spouses, Wasmiyah Al Damir, married King Abdulaziz after Abdullah bin Jiluwi died in 1938. They had no child from this marriage.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chatty, Dawn (2006). Nomadic Societies in the Middle East And North Africa: Entering the 21st Century. Leiden: Brill. 
  2. ^ "Ibn Saud retakes Riyadh (1)". King Abdulaziz Information Resources. Retrieved 9 August 2012. 
  3. ^ "There were 40 of us". Saudi Aramco World. 2004. Retrieved 11 August 2012. 
  4. ^ "Emir Saud bin Jiluwi". Out in the Blue. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  5. ^ Henderson, Simon (1994). "After King Fahd" (Policy Paper). Washington Institute. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Al Kahtani, Mohammad Zaid (December 2004). "The Foreign Policy of King Abdulaziz" (PDF). University of Leeds. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  7. ^ Salameh, Ghassane; Vivian Steir (October 1980). "Political Power and the Saudi State". MERIP (91): 5–22. JSTOR 3010946. 
  8. ^ a b c Herb, Michael (1999). All in the family. Albany: State University of New York Press. p. 102. ISBN 0-7914-4168-7. 
  9. ^ Peter J. Chelkowski; Robert J. Pranger (1988). Ideology and Power in the Middle East: Studies in Honor of George Lenczowski. Duke University Press. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  10. ^ "Wasmiyah Al Damir Biography". Datarabia. Retrieved 11 August 2012.