Abdelkader Bensalah

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Abdelkader Bensalah
عبد القـادر بن صالح
World Leaders Investment Summit (7098511567) (cropped).jpg
Abdelkader Bensalah in 2012.
Acting Head of State of Algeria
Assumed office
9 April 2019
Prime MinisterNoureddine Bedoui
Preceded byAbdelaziz Bouteflika (President)
President of the Council of the Nation
Assumed office
2 July 2002
Preceded byBachir Boumaza
President of the People's National Assembly
In office
14 June 1997 – 10 June 2002
Preceded byHimself as President of the National Transitional Council
Succeeded byKarim Younes
Personal details
Born (1941-11-24) 24 November 1941 (age 77)
Fellaoucene, French Algeria
NationalityAlgerian
Political partyDemocratic National Rally

Abdelkader Bensalah (Arabic: عبد القـادر بن صالح‎, born 24 November 1941) is an Algerian politician who serves as President of the Council of the Nation since 2002 and as acting Head of State following the resignation of Abdelaziz Bouteflika in April 2019. Bensalah will run Algeria for a period of 90 days during which a new presidential election will be held.

Biography[edit]

Abdelkader Bensalah was officially born on 24 Novembre 1941 in Felaoussene, close to Tlemcen (French Algeria).[1][2] Persistent rumours, which he regularly denies, suggest he was born in Morocco and became an Algerian citizen after the Algerian War of Independence.[3] After working in Beirut to direct the Algerian Center for Information and Culture from 1970-1974, he returned to Algeria to work as a journalist at the state newspaper El Chaâb for three years, before being elected to represent the province of Tlemcen in 1977. Twelve years later, he was appointed Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, a position he held until 1993.[4][5]

As a member of the centrist Democratic National Rally (RND), he was President of the National Transitional Council from 1994 to 1997[6] and of the People's National Assembly from 1997 to 2002.[7]

Since July 2002, he has served as President of the Council of the Nation, the upper house of parliament.[4] He replaced Abdelaziz Bouteflika for some presidential duties, like welcoming foreign leaders to Algeria, during the last part of the former President's tenure.[8] He was a strong ally of the latter, supporting his fifth candidacy even during the 2019 Algerian protests.[8]

As provided for under article 102 of the Algerian Constitution, he became acting head of state of Algeria on 9 April 2019, seven days after the resignation of Abdelaziz Bouteflika.[9][10] His term can last for a maximum of 90 days while the presidential election is held. By law, he cannot participate in this election.[11][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.majliselouma.dz/index.php/ar/2016-07-19-12-34-56/2016-09-06-13-44-47
  2. ^ https://www.lesoirdalgerie.com/articles/2015/02/28/article.php?sid=175294&cid=2
  3. ^ "L'Algérie se prépare à l'après-Bouteflika". FIGARO. 19 May 2013.
  4. ^ a b Hana Saada (27 March 2019). "Algeria: Who is Abdelkader Bensalah, the future head of state?". DZ Breaking. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Abdelkader Bensalah, un fidèle de Bouteflika qui va assurer l'intérim en Algérie". Le Monde (in French). 4 April 2019. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  6. ^ "ALGERIA: parliamentary elections Al-Majlis Ech-Chaabi Al-Watani, 1997". archive.ipu.org.
  7. ^ "Algérie : qui est Abdelkader Bensalah, l'homme qui devrait prendre la succession d'Abdelaziz Bouteflika après sa démission ?". LCI.
  8. ^ a b "Algeria's next in line: Bouteflika loyalist Abdelkader Bensalah". France 24. 2 April 2019.
  9. ^ "Algeria's next in line: Bouteflika loyalist Abdelkader Bensalah". France 24. 2 April 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  10. ^ "Algeria protest: Abdelkader Bensalah named interim president". BBC. 9 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  11. ^ "Algerian Constitutional Council declares presidency vacant". TASS. 3 April 2019. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
Political offices
Preceded by
Abdelaziz Bouteflika
Head of state of Algeria
Acting

2019–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Bachir Boumaza
President of the Council of the Nation
2002–present