Abderrahim Zouari

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Abderrahim Zouari
عبد الرحيم الزواري
Minister of Transport
In office
2004–2011
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Minister of Tourism
In office
2002–2004
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Minister of Sports
In office
2000–2002
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Secretary-General of Constitutional Democratic Rally
In office
1999–2000
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Minister of Education
In office
1998–1999
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
1997–1997
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Ministry of Youth and Childhood
In office
1993–1997
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Ambassador of Tunisia to Maroc
In office
1992–1993
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Preceded by Mohamed Ghannouchi
Succeeded by Hamadi Jebali
Minister of Justice
In office
1991–1992
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Secretary-General of Constitutional Democratic Rally
In office
31 July 1988 – 20 February 1991
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali
Personal details
Born (1944-04-18) 18 April 1944 (age 71)
Dahmani, Tunisia
Political party Destourian Movement
Other political
affiliations
Constitutional Democratic Rally (–2011)

Abderrahim Zouari (Arabic: عبد الرحيم الزواري‎; born in 1944) is a Tunisian politician. He was the Minister of Transport from 2004 to 2011 under President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.[1][2][3] He is the candidate for the Destourian Movement in the 2014 presidential election.

Biography[edit]

From 1974 to 1978, he served as Governor of Gabès, then Governor of Nabeul.[3] In 1991, he was appointed as Minister of Justice.[3] From 1992 to 1993, he served as the Tunisian ambassador to Morocco.[3] He was appointed as Foreign Minister in 1997, then as Education Minister in 1999.[3] He also served as Secretary-General of the Constitutional Democratic Rally.[3][4] In 2001, he was appointed as Minister of Youth and Sports, as well as Tourism and Handicrafts.[3][5] In 2004, he was appointed as Minister of Transport, remaining in that post until he was dismissed in the aftermath of the 2010–2011 Tunisian revolution.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CIA World Leaders
  2. ^ A Directory of World Leaders & Cabinet Members of Foreign Governments: 2008-2009 Edition, Arc Manor, 2008, p. 406 [1]
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h European Investment Bank biography
  4. ^ 'Tunisia names former minister to head ruling party', CNN, December 5, 2000 [2]
  5. ^ UN document