Abdul Aziz al-Harbi

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Abdul Aziz al-Harbi
Born 1965
Saudi Arabia
Nationality Saudi Arabian
Ethnicity Arab
Occupation Professor, Scholar
Religion Islam
Denomination Sunni
Jurisprudence Zahiri
Creed Athari
Alma mater Islamic University of Madinah, Umm al-Qura University
Tafsir, Arabic language

Abdul Aziz bin Ali al-Harbi is a Saudi Arabian Islamic scholar and professor at Umm al-Qura University in Mecca.[1]

Career[edit]

A native of Mecca, Harbi was a diligent student. He memorized the entirety of the Qur'an, the Muslim holy book, at the age of eleven.[2]

Harbi earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Exegesis of the Qur'an, known to Muslims as Tafsir, from Islamic University of Madinah in 1989. Nine years later, he completed a Master of Arts degree in the Muslim prophetic tradition, known as the Sunnah, at Umm al-Qura University, where he would eventually complete his Doctorate of Philosophy in Qur'anic exegesis in 2001.[2] He was promoted to the rank of associate professor at Umm al-Qura in 2006, and currently teaches exegesis. He is also a member of the university's academic board.[3]

Harbi also has an Ijazah authorization in all ten Qira'at, or variant methods of reciting the Qur'an, with a complete chain of narration going back to the original reciters of the Qur'an.[2][3] The majority of his published works, however, have been within the field of the Arabic language, especially in regard to Arabic rhetoric.

Views[edit]

Harbi is notable for holding the view that Harut and Marut, who tempted the people of Babylon, were human beings rather than angels.[1] While this is not the majority view, it was also held by `Abd Allah ibn `Abbas, Abu al-Aswad al-Du'ali, Hasan of Basra, Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari, Al-Zamakhshari and Al-Baghawi.[4] Harbi is a prominent proponent of the Zahirite school of law within Sunni Islam, viewing it as the school of the first generation of Muslims.[5]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ansar Al-'Adl, Can Angels Disobey? The Case of Harut and Marut. Retrieved 2013-1-28.
  2. ^ a b c Dr. Abdul Aziz al-Harbi, Tawjih mushkil al-qira`at al-'ashariya al-farashiya lughatan wa tasfiran wa i'raban, back cover. 1st. ed. Riyadh: Dar Ibn Hazm, 2003.
  3. ^ a b Biography of Dr. Abdul Aziz al-Harbi on the official website of the Arabic Language Academy. 7 February 2012. Accessed 29 January 2013.
  4. ^ Muhammad Asad, The Message of The Qur'an, explanation of 2:102. The Book Foundation: 2003 print.
  5. ^ Falih al-Dhibyani, Al-zahiriyya hiya al-madhhab al-awwal, wa al-mutakallimun 'anha yahrifun bima la ya'rifun. Interview with Okaz. 15 July 2006, Iss. #1824. Photography by Salih Ba Habri.