Abdullah al-Ghumari

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Abdullah bin al-Siddiq al-Ghumari
Personal
Born1910
Died1993
ReligionIslam
NationalityMoroccan
EthnicityMoroccan
DenominationSunni
JurisprudenceZahiri[citation needed]
CreedAthari[citation needed]
MovementSufism
OccupationHadith scholar

Abu al-Fadl Abdullah bin Muhammad bin al-Siddiq al-Ghumari (1910–1993) was a Moroccan preacher, jurist and theologian.[1]

Life[edit]

Ghumari was born in the Moroccan city of Tangier in 1910, and died in the same city in 1993.[2] As a child, he was primarily educated by his father Muhammad bin al-Siddiq al-Ghumari, also an Islamic scholar. The younger Ghumari memorized the entirety of the Qur'an at an early age, in addition to the Hadith book Bulugh al-Maram along with Alfiya and Ajārūmīya in Arabic grammar.[citation needed]

Ghumari later travelled to Fas for his higher education, but then enrolled in the University of al-Karaouine. While there, he also studied Mosque of Uqba,[2] a UNESCO World Heritage Site and important seat of Muslim religious learning.[3] During his study, Ghumari's teachers covered a number of books considered canonical in Sunni Islam, Al-Qastallani's explanation of Sahih al-Bukhari and the works of Khalil ibn Ishaq al-Jundi being two examples.[2] Eventually, Ghumari switched from Karaouine to Al-Azhar University in 1930 and graduating the next year. During his education, Ghumari was a student of Al-Kawthari, of whom Ghumari would later hold extremely negative views.[4]

Due to fears in the wider Arab world regarding the influence of the Muslim Brotherhood in the mid-twentieth century, Ghumari was accused of having ties to a foreign group.[citation needed] In 1961, he was sentenced to ten years in prison, likely due to his time spent in Egypt where the Brotherhood had formed. Hi[citation needed]s older brother, Ahmad al-Ghumari, fell ill upon hearing of his younger brother's long sentence and died eight months later.

Career[edit]

Ghumari was known not only for the number of teachers which he had, but also the number of students. Salâh Ud Dîn At Tijânî and Muhammad bin Yahya al-Ninowy is counted as one of Ghumari's more prominent students,[5][6][7] as is Hassan al-Kattani.[8]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Mustafa Shah, The Hạdīth: Scholarship, perspectives, and criticism, Routledge, 2010, p. 210
  2. ^ a b c The Biography of Abu al Fadl Abdullah bin as-Siddiq al-Ghumari who died in the year 1413AH, written and translated by Riad Nachef. Available at:
    *Ayouby.com
    *Riad Nachef, Islamic Affairs
  3. ^ Great Mosque of Kairouan (discoverislamicart.org) Archived 2013-04-07 at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ Gibril Haddad, The Ghumari School. 6 December 2002: Living Islam. Last updated 2 June 2003.
  5. ^ Shaykh Muhammad Bin Yahya An-Ninowy. 2009: Al Buruj Press.
  6. ^ Shaykh Muhammad al-Ninowy: Senior Instructor. The Deen Institute.
  7. ^ Shaykh Muhammad al-Ninowy. Gateway to Divine Mercy.
  8. ^ Cordoba Academy Faculty Archived 2013-01-26 at the Wayback Machine., © 2012 Cordoba Academy. Accessed February 17, 2013.

External links[edit]