Abdullah ibn Abi Bakr

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‘Abdullah ibn Abi Bakr (Arabic: عبدالله ابن أبي بكر‎‎) (c.610-633) was a son of Abu Bakr the first Caliph, a brother of Aisha and a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

Childhood[edit]

He was born in Mecca, the son of Abu Bakr ibn Abi Quhafa, from the Taym clan of the Quraysh tribe, and of Qutaylah bint Abd-al-Uzza, who was from the Amir ibn Luayy clan.[1]:28-29[2]:140-141[3]:193 His parents were divorced soon before or soon after his birth.[4]:178

When Muhammad and Abu Bakr fled from Mecca in September 622, Abu Bakr instructed Abdallah to listen to adult conversations and to report the day's news to them at the cave on Mount Thawr each night. Abdullah duly reported that the Quraysh had offered a hundred camels to anyone who captured Muhammad. Each morning, when he left the cave, the family servant would lead a flock of sheep over the same route to cover his tracks.[5]:224[1]:131

Emigration to Medina[edit]

A few months later, Abdullah emigrated to Medina in the company of his stepmother and two sisters.[6]:8[3]:172

In 630 Abdullah fought at the Siege of Ta'if, where the Thaqafite poet, Abu Mihjan, shot him with an arrow. This wound ultimately caused his death, although he survived for nearly three years afterwards.[5]:591[7]

Marriage[edit]

He married Atiqa bint Zayd, a poet from the Adi clan of the Quraysh. This marriage was childless.[4]:186 It was said that Abdullah respected Atiqa's judgment more than his own and that he spent so much time with her that he neglected his duties to the Islamic state. Abu Bakr punished his son by ordering him to divorce her. Abdullah did as he was told but was grief-stricken. He wrote poetry for Atiqa:[8][9]

I have never known a man like me divorce a woman like her,
nor any woman like her divorced for no fault of her own.[8]

In the end, Abdullah was allowed to take Atiqa back before her waiting period was completed.[8][9]:87

Death[edit]

Abdullah died in January 633, when his old wound from Ta'if flared up.[7][10]:76[11]:101 His wife composed an elegy for him.

I vow that my soul will remain in sorrow over thee
and my skin will remain dusty.[4]:187

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir vol. 3. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  2. ^ Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Blankinship, K. Y. (1993). Volume 11: The Challenge to the Empires. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  3. ^ a b Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Landau-Tasseron, E. (1998). Volume 39: The Biographies of the Prophet's Companions and Their Successors. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  4. ^ a b c Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir vol. 8. Translated by Bewley, A. (1995). The Women of Madina. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  5. ^ a b Muhammad ibn Ishaq. Sirat Rasul Allah. Translated by Guillaume, A. (1955). The Life of Muhammad. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  6. ^ Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by McDonald, M. V. (1987). Volume 7: The Foundation of the Community. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  7. ^ a b Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Donner, F. M. (1993). Volume 10: The Conquest of Arabia, p. 39. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  8. ^ a b c Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani. Al-Isaba fi tamyiz al-Sahaba vol. 8 #11448.
  9. ^ a b Abbott, N. (1942). Aishah - the Beloved of Mohammed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  10. ^ Jalal al-Din al-Suyuti. History of the Caliphs. Translated by Jarrett, H. S. (1881). Calcutta: The Asiatic Society.
  11. ^ Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Smith, G. R. (1994). Volume 14: The Conquest of Iran. Albany: State University of New York Press.