Abelardo Fernández

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Abelardo
Abelardo with Sporting Gijón.jpg
Abelardo managing Sporting Gijón in 2014
Personal information
Full name Abelardo Fernández Antuña
Date of birth (1970-04-19) 19 April 1970 (age 48)
Place of birth Gijón, Spain
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Centre back
Club information
Current team
Alavés (manager)
Youth career
1985–1986 La Braña
1986–1988 Estudiantes Somió
1988–1989 Sporting Gijón
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1989 Sporting B 4 (2)
1989–1994 Sporting Gijón 179 (13)
1994–2002 Barcelona 178 (11)
2002–2003 Alavés 28 (0)
Total 389 (26)
National team
1990 Spain U20 1 (0)
1990–1991 Spain U21 6 (1)
1991–1992 Spain U23 12 (5)
1991–2001 Spain 54 (3)
2002 Asturias 1 (1)
Teams managed
2008–2010 Sporting B
2010–2011 Candás
2011–2012 Tuilla
2012 Sporting Gijón (assistant)
2012–2014 Sporting B
2014–2017 Sporting Gijón
2017– Alavés
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Abelardo Fernández Antuña (Spanish pronunciation: [aβeˈlaɾðo feɾˈnandeθ anˈtuɲa]; born 19 April 1970), known simply as Abelardo, is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a central defender, and is the current manager of Deportivo Alavés.

A player with good heading and marking ability, he was also known for a distinctive bald head, a style which he adopted from a relatively young age. During his career he was almost exclusively associated with Sporting de Gijón and Barcelona, having amassed La Liga totals of 385 games and 24 goals over the course of 14 seasons, and also managed the former for three years.

Having won nearly 60 caps for Spain in one full decade, Abelardo represented the nation in two World Cups and as many European Championships.

Club career[edit]

Born in Gijón, Asturias, Abelardo started his professional career with local Sporting de Gijón, with which he made his La Liga debuts. Signing with FC Barcelona for the 1994–95 season in a 275 million pesetas deal, he was always an important first-team element, helping the Catalans to two leagues, cups and supercups, adding another two European trophies. However, he was greatly hampered by injuries in his final years at the Camp Nou.[1]

Aged 32, Abelardo joined Deportivo Alavés, initially signing a two-year deal[2] but retiring after just one season[3] due to a recurrent knee injury, which had already bothered him at Barcelona.[4]

Subsequently, he took up coaching, starting with his first club's B-side in 2008. Midway through his second year he was fired, with the team managing to retain their third division status nonetheless. In the 2010 summer, he moved to neighbouring amateurs Candás CF.

Abelardo signed for CD Tuilla for the 2011–12 campaign – also in Asturias and the fourth level – winning the Copa Federación de España (Asturias tournament). On 10 February 2012, former club Sporting Gijón hired him as an assistant coach after Iñaki Tejada was appointed following the departure of Manolo Preciado.[5]

Abelardo returned to head coach duties and Sporting B for 2012–13.[6] Late into the following season, he led them to a 4–1 away win over neighbouring Real Oviedo and, one week later, replaced the sacked José Ramón Sandoval at the helm of the main squad.[7] Amidst severe financial problems, he led them to promotion back to the top flight in his first full season, and quit his post in January 2017 due to irreconcilable differences.[8]

On 1 December 2017, Abelardo was hired as manager of Alavés, which was placed in the last position in the top division at the date of his arrival.[9] His first game in charge took place three days later, and he led the visitors to a 3–2 away win over Girona FC after they trailed 0–2 with 20 minutes left.[10]

International career[edit]

Abelardo made his debut for the Spain national team on 4 September 1991, in a friendly against Uruguay in Oviedo.[11] He went on to appear in a further 53 games and score three goals, being a participant at the 1994 and 1998 FIFA World Cups and UEFA Euro 1996 and 2000.

Abelardo was also an essential member of the squad that won the gold medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, netting in both the semi-finals (2–0, Ghana) and the final (3–2 over Poland).[12][13]

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 12 October 1991 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  France 1–2 1–2 Euro 1992 qualifying
2. 13 November 1991 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Czechoslovakia 1–0 2–1 Euro 1992 qualifying
3. 29 March 2000 Montjuïc, Barcelona, Spain  Italy 2–0 2–0 Friendly

Personal life[edit]

Abelardo first met Luis Enrique at the age of 6, and the pair played together for the same junior team, Sporting, Barcelona and Spain.[8]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 8 December 2018
Managerial record by team and tenure
Team Nat From To Record Ref
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Sporting B Spain 10 July 2008 4 January 2010 59 19 9 31 67 87 −20 032.20 [14]
Candás Spain 1 July 2010 14 June 2011 38 19 12 7 60 38 +22 050.00 [15]
Tuilla Spain 14 June 2011 10 February 2012 24 11 6 7 29 26 +3 045.83 [16]
Sporting B Spain 22 May 2012 4 May 2014 73 23 25 25 94 96 −2 031.51 [17][18]
Sporting Gijón Spain 4 May 2014 17 January 2017 110 37 34 39 130 144 −14 033.64 [18][19]
Alavés Spain 1 December 2017 Present 46 23 6 17 62 53 +9 050.00 [20]
Career Total 350 132 92 126 442 444 −2 037.71

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Club[edit]

Barcelona

International[edit]

Spain U23

Manager[edit]

Candás
Tuilla

References[edit]

  1. ^ Injury woe for Abelardo; UEFA, 9 January 2002
  2. ^ Alavés take on Abelardo; UEFA, 4 June 2002
  3. ^ Abelardo ready to say adiós; UEFA, 4 June 2003
  4. ^ Abelardo on the mend; UEFA, 22 January 2002
  5. ^ "Abelardo se incorpora al primer equipo como segundo entrenador" [Abelardo joins first team as assistant coach] (in Spanish). Sporting de Gijón. 10 February 2012. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  6. ^ Vega-Arango anuncia que se bajará el precio de los abonos (Vega-Arango announces season tickets will be cheaper); Sporting de Gijón, 22 May 2012 (in Spanish)
  7. ^ Abelardo Fernández sustituye a Sandoval como entrenador del Sporting (Abelardo Fernández replaces Sandoval as Sporting coach) Archived 4 May 2014 at the Wayback Machine.; Sporting de Gijón, 4 May 2014 (in Spanish)
  8. ^ a b "Abelardo Fernández saved Sporting Gijón but now his revolution is over". The Guardian. 23 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  9. ^ "Abelardo: "Estoy muy identificado con el Alavés; en un gran club con una afición espectacular y entre todos saldremos de esta situación"" [Abelardo: "I relate greatly to Alavés; in a great club with an awesome fanbase and together we will see ends meet"] (in Spanish). Deportivo Alavés. 1 December 2017. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  10. ^ "Pedraza e Ibai le dan la primera alegría a Abelardo" [Pedraza and Ibai give first joy to Abelardo]. Marca (in Spanish). 4 December 2017. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  11. ^ "Tiempo de llorar, tiempo de soñar" [A time to cry, a time to dream]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 5 September 1991. Retrieved 20 March 2014.
  12. ^ "Supervivientes de oro" [Golden survivors]. El País (in Spanish). 25 February 2007. Retrieved 24 May 2018.
  13. ^ "El triunfo en el fútbol, broche de oro para España en Barcelona 92" [Football win, icing on the cake for Spain in Barcelona 92] (in Spanish). Dame Un Silbidito. April 2010. Retrieved 20 March 2014.
  14. ^ "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
    "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  15. ^ "Tercera División (Grupo 2) 2010–11" [Tercera División (Group 2) 2010–11] (in Spanish). Futbolme. Retrieved 19 March 2016.
  16. ^ "Tercera División (Grupo 2) 2011–12" [Tercera División (Group 2) 2011–12] (in Spanish). Futbolme. Retrieved 19 March 2016.
  17. ^ "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
  18. ^ a b "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
  19. ^ "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
    "Sporting Gijon results". Sky Sports. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
    "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 22 October 2016.
  20. ^ "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
    "Abelardo: Abelardo Fernández Antuña". BDFutbol. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  21. ^ "La Roja de 1992, nuestra medalla de oro Olímpica" [1992's La Roja, our Olympic gold medal] (in Spanish). Antena 3. 3 July 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2017.

External links[edit]