Linnaea chinensis

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Linnaea chinensis
Abelia chinensis2.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Dipsacales
Family: Caprifoliaceae
Genus: Linnaea
Species:
L. chinensis
Binomial name
Linnaea chinensis
(R.Br.) A.Braun & Vatke[1]
Synonyms[1]
  • Abelia aschersoniana (Graebn.) Rehder
  • Abelia cavaleriei H.Lév.
  • Abelia chinensis R.Br.
  • Abelia hanceana Mart. ex Hance
  • Abelia ionandra Hayata
  • Abelia lipoensis M.T.An & G.Q.Gou
  • Abelia rupestris Lindl.
  • Linnaea aschersoniana Graebn.
  • Linnaea rupestris (Lindl.) A.Braun & Vatke

Linnaea chinensis, synonyms Abelia chinensis and Abelia rupestris, is a species of flowering plant in the honeysuckle family Caprifoliaceae. It was described by Robert Brown in 1818,[2] and transferred to the genus Linnaea in 1872,[1] although this move was not widely accepted until 2013.[3] The plant inhabits China, Taiwan and Japan.[4] It is a compact deciduous shrub[5] with reddish stems and glossy, small leaves that become reddish-brown before autumn. It is one of the most cold-resistant species within the genus.

Its simplified-form flowers are funnel-shaped, white, and its pink sepals remain long after flowering.

Linnaea chinensis is commonly cultivated in China[4] and is also used elsewhere.[6] The cultivar 'China Rose'[7] has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

A garden hybrid between L. chinensis and L. uniflora was once thought to be only a variety of L. chinensis and was known, under the synonym Abelia rupestris, as A. rupestris var. grandiflora. It is now Linnaea × grandiflora.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Linnaea chinensis (R.Br.) A.Braun & Vatke". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 2018-01-22.
  2. ^ "The Plant List: Abelia chinensis R.Br". Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanic Garden. 2013. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  3. ^ Christenhusz, Maarten J.M. (2013). "Twins are not alone: a recircumscription of Linnaea (Caprifoliaceae)". Phytotaxa. pp. 25–32. doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.125.1.4. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  4. ^ a b Qiner Yang & Sven Landrein. "Abelia chinensis". Flora of China. Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  5. ^ "Abelia chinensis". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 20 December 2017.
  6. ^ E.g., "Abelia chinensis R. Br". The Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  7. ^ RHS Plant Finder 2017. United Kingdom: Royal Horticultural Society. 2017. p. 960. ISBN 1907057773.