Aberdeen Gardens (Hampton, Virginia)

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Aberdeen Gardens
ABERDEEN GARDENS, HAMPTON VA.jpg
Aberdeen Gardens (Hampton, Virginia) is located in Virginia
Aberdeen Gardens (Hampton, Virginia)
Aberdeen Gardens (Hampton, Virginia) is located in the United States
Aberdeen Gardens (Hampton, Virginia)
LocationRoughly bounded by Langston and Mary Peake Blvds., and Russell, Davis, Lewis, Weaver and Walker Rds., Hampton, Virginia
Coordinates37°02′00″N 76°24′21″W / 37.03333°N 76.40583°W / 37.03333; -76.40583Coordinates: 37°02′00″N 76°24′21″W / 37.03333°N 76.40583°W / 37.03333; -76.40583
Area110 acres (45 ha)
Built1934 (1934)
Architectural styleColonial Revival, Queen Anne vernacular
NRHP reference #94000456[1]
VLR #114-0146
Significant dates
Added to NRHPMay 26, 1994
Designated VLRMarch 10, 2004[2]

Aberdeen Gardens is a national historic district located at Hampton, Virginia, United States. The district was part of a planned community initiated by Hampton University under New Deal legislation. The neighborhood is listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places. The district encompasses 157 contributing buildings.[3]

Design[edit]

The community was designed for the resettlement of African American workers in Newport News and Hampton. It was the only such Resettlement Administration community for blacks in Virginia. The seven streets within the community, excluding Aberdeen Road, are named for prominent African Americans: (1) Lewis Road, (2) Weaver Road, (3) Walker Road, (4) Mary Peake Boulevard, (5) Davis Road, (6) Russell Road, and (7) Langston Boulevard.[4] The community is a 440-acre (180 ha) subdivision, including 158 single-family homes, one school, and a commercial center. The community started construction in 1934 and was finished three years later, in 1937.[3]

Historic designations[edit]

In 1994, the community was listed as a historic district on the Virginia State Register of Historic Landmarks as well as the National Register of Historic Places.[3] It is also part of the Hampton Roads history tour, the plaque for which reads:

"Built by Negroes for Negroes, Aberdeen Gardens began in 1934 as the model resettlement community for Negro families. It was the only such community in the United States designed by a Negro architect (Hilyard R. Robinson) and built by Negro contractors and laborers. Aberdeen Gardens is composed of 158 brick houses on large garden lots, a school, and a community store, all within a greenbelt. The streets, excepting Aberdeen Road, are named for prominent Negroes. Aberdeen Gardens offered home ownership and an improved quality of life in a rural setting. In 1994 this nationally significant neighborhood was listed as a Virginia landmark and in the National Register of Historic Places, through the efforts of former and current residents."[5]

Further reading[edit]

  • Aberdeen Gardens Heritage Committee. Aberdeen Gardens. Mount Pleasant: Arcadia Publishing (2007). ISBN 0738552925

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived from the original on 2013-09-21. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  3. ^ a b c John S. Salmon and Marc C. Wagner (December 1993). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Aberdeen Gardens" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-10-29. Retrieved 2013-10-26. and Accompanying photo Archived 2013-10-29 at the Wayback Machine and Accompanying map Archived 2013-10-29 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Aberdeen Gardens-Hampton, VA". livingnewdeal.org. Living New Deal. Retrieved 9 December 2014.
  5. ^ Historic Hampton Roads

External links[edit]