Abgaal

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Main article: Somali clan
Abgaal
أبغال
Regions with significant populations
Languages
Somali and Arabic
Religion
Islam
Related ethnic groups
Mudulood, Habar Gidir, Karanle, other Hawiye clans

Abgaal (var. Abgal; Somali: Abgaal, Arabic: أبغال‎‎) is a Somali clan, and part of the major Hawiye clan. Its members live in the Shabeellaha Dhexe, Galguduud, Banaadir, Mudug, Lower Shebelle, Middle Juba,[1] and Jubbada Hoose[2][non-primary source needed][self-published source?][better source needed] regions of Central and southern Somalia. Abgaals consider Xamar (Mogadishu) as their traditional territory.[3]

Abgaal is one subclan of the Mudulood family, which also includes Wacdaan, Moobleen, and Ujajeen.[4]

Clan tree[edit]

There is no clear agreement on the clan and sub-clan structures and many lineages are omitted. The following listing is taken from the World Bank's Conflict in Somalia: Drivers and Dynamics from 2005 and the United Kingdom's Home Office publication, Somalia Assessment 2001.[5][6]

  • Hawiye
    • Gaaljal
    • Hawadle
    • Abgal [sic]
      • Harti
      • Wabudhan
        • Da'oud
        • Rer Mattan
        • Mohamed Muse
      • Wa'esli
    • Murosade
    • Sheekhaal (Sheikal)
    • Habar Gidir (Haber Gedir)
      • Sa'ad
      • Suleiman
      • Ayr
      • Sarur
    • Waadan

In the south central part of Somalia the World Bank shows the following clan tree:[7]

  • Hawiye
    • Karanle
      • Murusade
    • Gorgate
      • Abgal [sic]
      • Habargidir (Habar Gidir)
      • Sheikhal (Sheekhaal)
      • Duduble
      • Ujeien
    • Gugun-Dhabe
    • Rarane
    • Haskul
    • Jambeele
      • Hawadle
      • Galje'el
      • Ajuran
      • Dagodi

In Puntland the World Bank shows the following:[8]

  • Hawiye
    • Habar Gidir
    • Abgaal
    • Biyamaal
    • Hawaadle
    • Murursade
    • Ujuuran

Traditional[edit]

  • Imam Mohamud Imam Cumar ,Is the Imam Of Mudulood and also carries the dual position of The Traditional Imam of Hiraab.[9]

Prominent members of the Abgaal[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inter-clan Fighting in Middle Jubba". Mareeg Online. 11 March 2011. Retrieved 11 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "SUPPORT FROM WAAX IYO WAADI TO WAGOSHA MOVEMENT.". Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  3. ^ Jimale Ahmed, Ali (1 January 2002). "Nuruddin Farah and the (Re)Writing of Somali Historiography: Narrative as a Politically Symbolic Act". In Wright, Derek. Emerging Perspectives on Nuruddin Farah. Trenton, New Jersey: Africa World Press. p. 234. ISBN 978-0-86543-919-1. Retrieved 19 November 2013. 
  4. ^ Ahmed, Ali Jimale (1995). The Invention of Somalia. Lawrenceville, New Jersey: The Red Sea Press. p. 134. ISBN 978-0-932415-99-8. Retrieved 19 November 2013. 
  5. ^ Worldbank, Conflict in Somalia: Drivers and Dynamics, January 2005, Appendix 2, Lineage Charts, p.55 Figure A-1
  6. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 2009-12-06.  Country Information and Policy Unit, Home Office, Great Britain, Somalia Assessment 2001, Annex B: Somali Clan Structure], p. 43
  7. ^ Worldbank, Conflict in Somalia: Drivers and Dynamics, January 2005, Appendix 2, Lineage Charts, p.56 Figure A-2
  8. ^ Worldbank, Conflict in Somalia: Drivers and Dynamics, January 2005, Appendix 2, Lineage Charts, p.57 Figure A-3
  9. ^ http://www.etext.org/Politics/Somalia.News.Update/Volume.3/snu-03.003
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 1 July 2008. Retrieved 1 July 2008. 
  11. ^ Said S. Samatar (2001). "Somalia: Africa's Problem Child?". Mudug Online. Retrieved 4 February 2011. 
  12. ^ "Socdaalkii Duqa Magaalda Muqdisho Dr Xuseen Cali Axmed ee uu Scandenevianka ku maarayey 15 –20 febaraayo oo naqoday mid lagu guuleeeystay.". Mudulood.com (in Somali). Retrieved 18 April 2011. 
  13. ^ a b John Pike (2006-03-22). "SOMALIA: Twelve killed in heavy fighting in Mogadishu". Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  14. ^ A. Duale Sii'arag (15 Nov 2005). "The Birth and Rise of Al-Ittihad Al-Islami in the Somali Inhabited Regions in the Horn of Africa". Newbanadir.com. Archived from the original on 20 June 2007. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  15. ^ "Somalia: Farah Addo elected chairman of football federation". Mareeg.com. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ "CFS". Canadian Friends of Somalia. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  18. ^ John Pike (2006-08-21). "SOMALIA: Premier appoints new cabinet". Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  19. ^ a b [2]
  20. ^ "Rival Somali gunmen call it quits | News | Mail & Guardian". Mg.co.za. 2002-01-01. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  21. ^ "Warlords agree on Mogadishu authority". BBC News. 22 December 1999. Retrieved 23 April 2010. 
  22. ^ "Declaration on Cessation of Hostilities and the Structures and Principles of the Somalia National Reconciliation Process (S/2002/1359) | ReliefWeb". Reliefweb.int. 2002-12-13. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  23. ^ [3][dead link]
  24. ^ "PROFILE: Dr. Mohamed Ali "Ameriko"". Banadir.com. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  25. ^ Laitin, David D. (1 May 1977). Politics, Language, and Thought: The Somali Experience. University of Chicago Press. p. 87. ISBN 978-0-226-46791-7. Retrieved 19 November 2013. 
  26. ^ Biber, Douglas; Finegan, Edward (7 December 1993). Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Register. Oxford University Press, USA. p. 213. ISBN 978-0-19-535932-9. Retrieved 19 November 2013.