Abhira Kingdom

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Abhira Kingdom
Abhira
248 A.D.–315 or 415 A.D.[1]
EpicIndia.jpg
Capital Trikuta[2]
Religion Vedic Hinduism
Buddhism
Government Monarchy
Janaka (King or Chief)[citation needed]  
Historical era Early Classical
• Established
248 A.D.
• Disestablished
315 or 415 A.D.[1]
Today part of  India


The Abhira kingdom in the Mahabharata is either of two kingdoms near the Sarasvati river. They were dominated by the Abhiras, sometimes referred to as Surabhira also, combining both Sura and Abhira kingdoms. Modern day Abhira territory lies within Northern areas of Gujarat and Southern Rajasthan, India. King Sivadatta was probably the founder of the Abhira/ahira kingdom.[3][4]

Reference of Abhiras in Mahabharat[edit]

Abhiras are mentioned as warriors in support of Duryodhana in Mahabharta war.[5][6] The Gopas, whom Krishna had offered to Duryodhana to fight in his support when he himself joined Arjuna's side, were no other than the Yadavas themselves, who were also the Abhiras.[7] Ramayana refers to Abhiras as Ugradarshana – Mlecchas and dasyus.[8][9] The Abhiras also have been described as Vratas. Panini mentions these Vratas as robbers. The Abhiras are said to have looted the train of Arjuna, the Pandava, when he was returning from Dwaraka being accompanied by some of the members of "Sri Krishna's family after the death of the latter. Abhiras are said to have waylaid Arjuna and deprived him of remaining wealth from Dwarka and women somewhere in Punjab."[10] Abhiras who looted Arjuna were the supporters of the Kauravas, and in the Mahabharata,[11] Abhir, Gopa, Gopal[12] and Yadavas are all synonyms.[13][14][15] They defeated the hero of Mahabharatha war, and did spare him when he disclosed the identity of the members of the family of Sri Krishna.[16]

Abhira kingdom of Maharashtra[edit]

The Abhiras ruled western Maharashtra which included Nasik, Aparanta, Lata [17] and Khandesh[18]

Abhira kingdom of South India[edit]

According to historian Sudhakar Chattopadhyaya the abhira kingdom was far more extended in South India.[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sudhakar Chattopadhyaya (1974). Some Early Dynasties of South India. Motilal Banarsidass Publ. pp. 128–130. ISBN 978-81-208-2941-1. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  2. ^ B.H. Mehta. Gonds of the Central Indian Highlands Vol II. Concept Publishing Company. pp. 569–. GGKEY:DDRXNHQXYN8. Retrieved 26 September 2017.
  3. ^ Numismatic Society of India (1991). The Journal of the Numismatic Society of India. 53. ISSN 0029-6066. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  4. ^ The Journal of the Numismatic Society of India, Volume 53
  5. ^ Man in India – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. 17 July 2007. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  6. ^ Man in India, Volume 54-page-39
  7. ^ Man in India – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  8. ^ Ethnic history of Gujarat – Popatlal Govindlal Shah – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. 13 February 2009. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  9. ^ Ethnic history of Gujarat
  10. ^ Social movements and social transformation: a study of two backward classes movements in India
  11. ^ Ancient Nepal
  12. ^ Ancient Nepal – D. R. Regmi, Nepal Institute of Asian Studies – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. 1 December 1973. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  13. ^ Encyclopaedia of ancient Indian ... – Subodh Kapoor – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  14. ^ Social movements and social ... – M. S. A. Rao – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. 14 December 2006. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  15. ^ Social movements and social ... – M. S. A. Rao – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. 14 December 2006. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  16. ^ Yadavas through the ages, from ... – J. N. Singh Yadav – Google Books. Books.google.co.in. 28 August 2007. Retrieved 18 October 2011.
  17. ^ By Sudhakar Chattopadhyaya (1974). "Some Early Dynasties of South India". History. Motilal. p. 129.
  18. ^ Subodh Kapoor. "Encyclopaedia of Ancient Indian Geography, Volume 1". Geography. Cosmo Publications. p. 2.
  19. ^ By Sudhakar Chattopadhyaya (1974). "Some Early Dynasties of South India". History. Motilal. p. 129.
  • Kisari Mohan Ganguli, The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Translated into English Prose, 1883–1896.