Abraham Clark High School

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Abraham Clark High School
Location
122 East 6th Avenue
Roselle, NJ 07203
Information
Type Public high school
School district Roselle Public Schools
Principal Rashon Mickens
Vice Principals Renee Edghill
Timothy Simmons
Sheila Williams
Faculty 72.5 (on FTE basis)[1]
Grades 9 - 12
Enrollment 741[1] (as of 2012-13)
Student to teacher ratio 10.22:1[1]
Color(s) Red, Grey and White             
Athletics conference Union County Interscholastic Athletic Conference
Team name Rams
Publication Rampage
Newspaper Rampage
Website

Abraham Clark High School is a four-year public high school that serves students in ninth through twelfth grade from the borough of Roselle, in Union County, New Jersey, United States, operating as part of the Roselle Public Schools. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1932.[2] The school is named for Abraham Clark, a Revolutionary War figure and signer of the Declaration of Independence.

As of the 2012-13 school year, the school had an enrollment of 741 students and 72.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.22:1. There were 443 students (59.8% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 109 (14.7% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.[1]

The school was one of 12 in New Jersey to receive a School Improvement Grant, under which the district will be given $3.8 million over three years as part of a transformation plan that will lengthen the school day, update the curriculum with integrated technology and shift eighth graders out of the school beginning in September 2011.[3]

Awards, recognition and rankings[edit]

The school was the 306th-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 339 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2014 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", using a new ranking methodology.[4] The school had been ranked 315th in the state out of 328 schools in 2012, after being ranked 272nd in 2010 out of 322 schools listed.[5] The magazine ranked the school 283rd in 2008 out of 316 schools.[6] The school was ranked 305th in the magazine's September 2006 issue, which surveyed 316 schools across the state.[7]

Athletics[edit]

Abraham Clark High School competes in the Union County Interscholastic Athletic Conference, following a reorganization of sports leagues in Northern New Jersey by the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA).[8] With 506 students in grades 10-12, the school was classified by the NJSIAA for the 2014-15 school year as Central Jersey, Group II for most athletic competition purposes, which included schools with an enrollment of 506 to 749 students in that grade range.[9] Prior to the NJSIAA's 2010 realignment, the school had been part of the Mountain Valley Conference, which included public and parochial high schools covering Union County and Essex County in northern New Jersey.[10]

School colors are red and gray. Sports offered include Golf (women), Volleyball (women), Golf (men), Cross Country (women), Tennis (women), Football, Basketball (women), Softball, Cross Country (men), Soccer (men), Basketball (men), Track and Field Winter (men), Baseball, Track and Field Winter (women), Track and Field Spring (women) and Track and Field Spring (men)[11]

The 2008 boys basketball team won the Central, Group II state sectional championship with a 72-63 win over Weequahic High School in the tournament final.[12][13]

MCJROTC[edit]

ACHS is currently involved in the Marine Corps JROTC program which inspires cadets to become leaders and responsible citizens.

Administration[edit]

Core members of the school's administration are:[14]

  • Rashon Mickens, Principal
  • Renee Edghill, Vice Principal
  • Timothy Simmons, Vice Principal
  • Sheila Williams, Vice Principal

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d School Data for Abraham Clark High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed March 23, 2015.
  2. ^ Abraham Clark High School, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools. Accessed July 27, 2011.
  3. ^ Rundquist, Jeanette. "Troubled Roselle school will get $3.8M in federal funds for turnaround", The Star-Ledger, August 14, 2010. Accessed August 30, 2011.
  4. ^ Staff. "Top Schools Alphabetical List 2014", New Jersey Monthly, September 2, 2014. Accessed September 5, 2014.
  5. ^ Staff. "The Top New Jersey High Schools: Alphabetical", New Jersey Monthly, August 16, 2012. Accessed August 23, 2012.
  6. ^ Staff. "2010 Top High Schools", New Jersey Monthly, August 16, 2010. Accessed March 18, 2011.
  7. ^ "Top New Jersey High Schools 2008: By Rank", New Jersey Monthly, September 2008, posted August 7, 2008. Accessed August 19, 2008.
  8. ^ League Memberships – 2014-2015, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed November 26, 2014.
  9. ^ 2014-2015 Public Schools Group Classification: ShopRite Cup–Basketball–Baseball–Softball for Central Jersey, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association, as of July 8, 2014. Accessed November 26, 2014.
  10. ^ Home Page, Mountain Valley Conference, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 2, 2011. Accessed November 26, 2014.
  11. ^ Abraham Clark High School, New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed November 26, 2014.
  12. ^ 2008 Boys Basketball - Central, Group II, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed March 12, 2008.
  13. ^ Reilly, Sean. "Roselle rallies to capture crown", The Star-Ledger, March 4, 2008. Accessed March 12, 2008.
  14. ^ Program of Studies - 2014-2015 School Year, Abraham Clark High School. Accessed November 26, 2014.
  15. ^ Rabih Abdullah, database Football. Accessed March 12, 2008. High school listed as "Barham [sic] Clark (Roselle, NJ)"
  16. ^ Staff. "OTHER MAJOR COLLEGE SIGNEES Series: SIGNING DAY", St. Petersburg Times, February 4, 1999. Accessed March 18, 2011.
  17. ^ Hughes, Will. "Gentle Giant", New Jersey Monthly, December 19, 2007. Accessed July 31, 2008.
  18. ^ Jesse Holley, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 6, 2007.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°39′14″N 74°15′41″W / 40.653866°N 74.261253°W / 40.653866; -74.261253