List of Marvel Comics characters: E

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Earth Lord[edit]

Earth Sentry[edit]

Earth Sentry (John Foster) was created by Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz, and first appeared in A-Next #2 (1999).

When John and his father Bill were investigating a UFO crash site, they discovered a Kree space probe. Upon nearing the ship, the automated defenses activated, and a robotic sentry was released. Bill activated a distress signal which was picked up by Mainframe and the rest of A-Next.

When the heroes arrived, the sentry robot attacked them. Thunderstrike's sonic blasts and J2's superstrength were not slowing the attacker. Stinger was able to blind the robot's optic sensors with sting darts, providing an opening for John to enter the ship and try to turn off the robotic sentry. When John made contact with the ship's console, a strange energy surge ripped through the ship's computers and struck him. The energy wave reconfigured John's DNA, making him genetically similar to a Kree warrior.

Finding himself clad in a green-and-white costume, similar to the original costume of Mar-Vell, John discovered that he had acquired great powers. John confronted and defeated the sentry robot, and stated that he would become an "Earth Sentry" to protect his planet from invaders.[volume & issue needed]

He politely declined membership with A-Next, but when the team was later captured by the Revengers, Earth Sentry returned and used his powers to help A-Next defeat the invaders. He then accepted membership with A-Next.[volume & issue needed]

Earth Sentry possesses superhuman strength and durability, due to his altered human/Kree DNA. His costume has wrist-mounted blasters that can fire photonic energy blasts. Rocket boosters on his belt allow him to fly.[volume & issue needed]

Earthquake[edit]

Ebon Samurai[edit]

Ecstasy[edit]

Echo[edit]

Ectokid[edit]

Ethan Edwards[edit]

Eel[edit]

Leopold Stryke[edit]

Edward Lavell[edit]

Egghead[edit]

Elihas Starr[edit]

Robot[edit]

Ego the Living Planet[edit]

Eitri[edit]

El Aguila[edit]

El Guapo[edit]

Electric Eve[edit]

Electro[edit]

Robot[edit]

Ivan Kronov[edit]

Max Dillon[edit]

Francine Frye[edit]

Electron[edit]

Elektra[edit]

Elektro[edit]

Elixer[edit]

Mitchell Ellison[edit]

Mitchell Ellison is a fictional character who originated in the Netflix adaptation of Daredevil, portrayed by Geoffrey Cantor. The character, created by Marco Ramirez, first appeared in "Rabbit in a Snow Storm" (April 10, 2015).

Ellison is the editor-in-chief of the New York Bulletin. Known for his dry, yet knowledgeable demeanor, Ellison believes in his employees' abilities to research and report a good story. He is long time friends with Ben Urich, whom he considers his most trusted reporter. Their friendship hits a snag with the appearance of the Devil of Hell's Kitchen and the rise in organized crime. As Ben insists on reporting on Wilson Fisk, Ellison wants him to work on meaningless fluff pieces to boost the paper's ailing circulation numbers.[1] Ellison still looks out for Urich, as he later offers Ben a promotion to a higher position that would guarantee Ben could pay for his wife Doris' medical bill, but Ben politely turns him down.[2]

Ellison and Ben finally have a falling out when Ben tries to print a story about Fisk killing his own father, but Ellison shoots him down citing a lack of proof. Ben begins to accuse him of being on Fisk's payroll, and such accusations get him fired as a result.[3] After Fisk kills Ben, Ellison attends his funeral and receives a cold stare from Karen Page. Ultimately, Ellison's secretary Caldwell turns out to be Fisk's informant as she is arrested by the FBI as part of a sweep orchestrated on Hoffman's testimony. Realizing he had failed Ben, Ellison could only put his head down in shame.[4]

In season two, Ellison aids Karen in looking into Frank Castle's background.[5] Seeing potential in her research skills, he offers her a reporter position at the Bulletin and gives her Ben's old office.[6] However, Ellison feels that Karen is getting too involved in the story regarding Frank and suggests that she get police protection. When Karen accuses him that he would not have done that to Ben, he states that he will not make that mistake again.[7] After Frank rescues Karen from the Blacksmith, she visits Ellison who is relieved to see that she is okay. Ellison even suggests writing Frank in a positive light after everything she has learned about him.[8]

Ellison reappears in The Punisher. Karen comes to him asking about any information regarding someone named Micro. Ellison revealed that he had received a story from Micro about possible corrupted government officials, but he was convinced not to publish it by Carson Wolf as it would hinder their investigation. However, he kept the story and information and gives it to Karen for her research.[9] He later tries to reason with Karen after she receives a letter from bomber, Lewis Wilson. When Frank's face is seen on camera and shown on the news, Ellison deduces that Karen was aware of him being alive.[10]

In season three of Daredevil, Ellison realizes that Karen is still concerned about the collapse of Midland Circle and has her take on another story that ironically qualms her concerns.[11] He later tries to set her up with his nephew, Jason, only for the two of them to learn about Fisk's sudden "freedom". Ellison reveals that his wife Lily is still somewhat traumatized by the events of the first season and that she would call him to see if he was okay despite Fisk's incarceration.[12] When Karen begins connecting Fisk to the Red Lion National Bank, Ellison congratulates her, but gives the story to someone else due to her past association.[13]

Ellison is later present when Matt and Karen bring in Jasper Evans, a convict paid by Fisk to shank him, and have him go on record about his association with Fisk. However, they are attacked by Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter, who has been sent by Fisk to the Bulletin to kill Evans and discredit Matt. Dex stabs Ellison in the stomach with a pencil, but he survives.[14] While recovering in the hospital, Karen hints that she knows that the Daredevil that attacked them was not the real one, causing Ellison to deduce that Karen knows Daredevil's identity. Angered over the loss of his coworkers, he forces Karen to resign when she refuses to compromise Matt's secret identity.[15]

Later, after Karen survives another attempt on her life from Dex, she is reunited with Ellison. While he is happy to see she is safe, still has not forgiven her for protecting the real Daredevil. She is able to convince Ellison to get in contact with several outlets so that she can hold an impromptu press conference while Matt and Foggy get FBI agent Ray Nadeem to testify against Fisk in front of a grand jury. The plan fails, though, as Fisk has anticipated their move and coerced all of the jurors into not indicting him.[16]Before being executed by Dex on Vanessa's orders, Nadeem films a dying declaration, which is handed down from his widow to Foggy, Karen, and finally Ellison, who hurriedly publishes the video on the Bulletin website, and which ensures that Fisk is sent back to prison. He is last seen attending Father Lantom's funeral, having now fully made amends with Karen.[17]

Mitchell Ellison in comics[edit]

Mitchell Ellison and the New York Bulletin are mentioned in Kingpin Vol. 2 #4, cementing their existence in the mainstream Marvel Universe. Journalist Sarah Dewey is given a folder by Wilson Fisk containing several notices and letters with Ellison being listed as the new editor-in-chief of the Bulletin after it was dropped from under the control of Gavin Boyce.

Elsie-Dee[edit]

Elysius[edit]

Empath[edit]

Emplate[edit]

Enchantress[edit]

Amora[edit]

Sylvie Lushton[edit]

En Dwi Gast[edit]

Energizer[edit]

Enforcer[edit]

Charles L. Delazny, Jr.[edit]

Mike Nero[edit]

Ent[edit]

Eon[edit]

Epoch[edit]

Epoch is the "daughter" of Eon and "granddaughter" of Eternity.[volume & issue needed]

Equinox[edit]

Ereshkigal[edit]

Goddess[edit]

Deviant[edit]

Eric the Red[edit]

Erg[edit]

Ernst[edit]

Ernst, a fictional mutant created by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely, first appeared in New X-Men vol. 1 #135 (April 2003).

Ernst, whose physical appearance suggests that she may be a teenage girl suffering from progeria or dyskeratosis congenita, is a student at the Xavier Institute. She briefly joined the so-called Brotherhood assembled by the mutant Xorn when he went on a drug-induced, destructive rampage as Magneto in New York City.[18] Ernst did not show any signs of aggression herself. She is one of the few mutants who have retained their powers after the events of "M-Day".[volume & issue needed] She continues living at the Xavier Institute.

In the alternate dystopian future of Here Comes Tomorrow, Ernst is revealed to actually be a rehabilitated Cassandra Nova, or at least a fragment of her, but this has yet to be revealed in the present era.

During the Quest for Magik arc, she was transported to Limbo alongside the other students and was captured by Belasco.[volume & issue needed] She returned to the school with the rest of her classmates when Magik/Darkchilde sent them all back to the human world.[volume & issue needed]

Later, Ernst appears with the inhabitants of Utopia, the new base of X-Men.

As part of the Jean Grey school's remedial class, she goes on weekly crime-fighting patrols with Special Counselor Spider-Man.[19]

Abraham Erskine[edit]

Abraham Erskine is a scientist during World War II in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, first appeared in Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941) as Professor Reinstein. The name was revised after Marvel resumed using Captain America. A 1965 retelling of Captain America's origin identified the character as Dr. Erskine.[20] Roy Thomas added that "Josef Reinstein" was an alias in a 1975 story set during World War II.[21] The full name Abraham Erskine would not be applied to the character until years later.[22]

Within the context of the stories, Abraham Erskine is a German biochemist and physicist who had spent much of his early life studying the human species. During this time he develops a diet and exercise program along with a serum and "vita-rays" which would transform an ordinary person into a "super soldier".[23][24][25] Horrified when he witnesses Adolf Hitler and Baron Zemo test a "death ray" on a human subject, he contacts the United States to defect from Nazi Germany.[26] After the United States Army gets him out of Germany and fakes his death, he takes the alias "Josef Reinstein".[22][27]

He recreates the Super Soldier Serum for Project: Rebirth for the U.S. Army. He oversees and administers the treatment to Steve Rogers before several U.S. Army officers and government officials. Moments after Rogers' transformation, Erskine is assassinated by Heinz Kruger.[23]

Abraham Erskine in other media[edit]

Television[edit]

Film[edit]

Eson the Searcher[edit]

Eternity[edit]

E.V.A.[edit]

Ever[edit]

Christine Everhart[edit]

Everyman[edit]

Evilhawk[edit]

Ex Nihilo[edit]

Executioner[edit]

Exodus[edit]

Ezekiel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kane, Adam (director); Marco Ramirez (writer) (April 10, 2015). "Rabbit in a Snow Storm". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 1. Episode 3. Netflix.
  2. ^ Blackburn, Farren (director); Luke Kalteux (writer) (April 10, 2015). "Nelson v. Murdock". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 1. Episode 10. Netflix.
  3. ^ Lyn, Euros (director); Douglas Petrie (writer) (April 10, 2015). "The Ones We Leave Behind". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 1. Episode 12. Netflix.
  4. ^ DeKnight, Steven S. (director); Steven S. DeKnight (writer) (April 10, 2015). "Daredevil". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 1. Episode 13. Netflix.
  5. ^ Sigismondi, Floria (director); Lauren Schmidt Hissrich (writer) (March 18, 2016). "Kinbaku". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 2. Episode 5. Netflix.
  6. ^ Surjik, Stephen (director); Marco Ramirez and Lauren Schmidt Hissrich (writer) (March 18, 2016). "Seven Minutes in Heaven". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 2. Episode 9. Netflix.
  7. ^ Hoar, Peter (director); Whit Anderson & Sneha Koorse (writer); John C. Kelley (story) (March 18, 2016). "The Man in the Box". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 2. Episode 10. Netflix.
  8. ^ Lyn, Euros (director); Douglas Petrie and Lauren Schmidt Hissrich (writer) (March 18, 2016). "The Dark at the End of the Tunnel". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 2. Episode 12. Netflix.
  9. ^ Shankland, Tom (director); Steve Lightfoot (writer) (November 17, 2017). "Two Dead Men". Marvel's The Punisher. Season 1. Episode 2. Netflix.
  10. ^ Jobst, Marc (director); Angela LaManna (writer) (November 17, 2017). "Front Toward Enemy". Marvel's The Punisher. Season 1. Episode 9. Netflix.
  11. ^ Ettlin, Lukas (director); Jim Dunn (writer) (October 19, 2018). "Please". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 2. Netflix.
  12. ^ Getzinger, Jennifer (director); Sonay Hoffman (writer) (October 19, 2018). "No Good Deed". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 3. Netflix.
  13. ^ Lopez, Alex Garcia (director); Lewaa Nasserdeen (writer) (October 19, 2018). "Blindsided". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 4. Netflix.
  14. ^ Surjik, Stephen (director); Dylan Gallagher (writer) (October 19, 2018). "The Devil You Know". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 6. Netflix.
  15. ^ Fraser, Toa (director); Sarah Streicher (writer) (October 19, 2018). "Aftermath". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 7. Netflix.
  16. ^ Abraham, Phil (director); Sam Ernst (writer) (October 19, 2018). "One Last Shot". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 12. Netflix.
  17. ^ Miller, Sam (director); Erik Oleson (writer) (October 19, 2018). "A New Napkin". Marvel's Daredevil. Season 3. Episode 13. Netflix.
  18. ^ New X-Men #146 (Nov. 2003)
  19. ^ Spider-Man and the X-Men Vol 1 #6 (April 2015)
  20. ^ Stan Lee (w), Jack Kirby (p). "The Origin of Captain America" Tales of Suspense 63 (March 1965), Marvel Comics
  21. ^ Roy Thomas (w), Frank Robbins (p). "A Captain Called America" Giant-Size Invaders 1 (June 1975), Marvel Comics
  22. ^ a b Roger Stern (w), John Byrne (p). "The Living Legend" Captain America 255 (March 1981), Marvel Comics
  23. ^ a b Joe Simon, Jack Kirby (w), Jack Kirby (p). "Case No. 1. Meet Captain America" Captain America Comics 1 (March 1941), Timely Comics
  24. ^ Stan Lee (w), Jack Kirby (p). "The Hero That Was!" Captain America 109 (January 1969)
  25. ^ Dan Slott, Christos Gage (w), Tom Feister (p). "Born To Serve" Avengers: The Initiative Annual 1 (January 2008), Marvel Comics
  26. ^ Fabian Nicieza (w), Tom Grummett (p). "History In the Making" Thunderbolts Presents: Zemo - Born Better 4 (July 2007), Marvel Comics
  27. ^ Ed Brubaker (w), Steve Epting (a). "Part Two" The Marvels Project 2 (November 2009), Marvel Comics
  28. ^ McNary, Dave (2010-06-07). "Stanley Tucci joins 'Captain America'". Variety. Retrieved 2011-03-22.