Abram (name)

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Abram is a masculine given name of Biblical Hebrew origin,[1] meaning exalted father.[2][3] In the Bible, it was originally the name of the first of the three Biblical patriarchs, who later became known as Abraham.

Russian name[edit]

The Russian language borrowed the name from Byzantine Christianity, but its popularity, along with other Biblical first names, declined by the mid-19th century.[1] The forms used by the Russian Orthodox church were "Авраа́м" (Avraam),[1][4] "Авраа́мий" (Avraamy),[4] and "Авра́мий" (Avramy),[5] but "Абра́м" (Abram) remained a popular colloquial variant.[1][3] Other colloquial forms included "Абра́мий" (Abramy),[3] "Авра́м" (Avram),[5] and "Обра́м" (Obram).[5] Until the end of the 19th century, the official Synodal Menologium also included the form "Абраха́м" (Abrakham).[6]

The patronymics derived from "Abram" are "Абра́мович" (Abramovich; masculine) and its colloquial form "Абра́мыч" (Abramych), and "Абра́мовна" (Abramovna; feminine).[3] The patronymics derived from "Abramy" are "Абра́миевич" (Abramiyevich; masculine) and "Абра́миевна" (Abramiyevna; feminine).[3] The patronymics derived from "Avraam" are "Авраа́мович" (Avraamovich; masculine) and "Авраа́мовна" (Avraamovna; feminine).[3] The patronymics derived from "Avraamy" are "Авраа́миевич" (Avraamiyevich; masculine) and "Авраа́миевна" (Avraamiyevna; feminine).[3] The patronymics derived from "Avram" are "Авра́мович" (Avramovich; masculine) and "Авра́мовна" (Avramovna; feminine).[3] The patronymics derived from "Avraamy" are "Авраа́миевич" (Avraamiyevich; masculine) and "Авраа́миевна" (Avraamiyevna; feminine).[3]

The diminutives of "Avraam" and "Avraamy" include "Авраа́мка" (Avraamka), "Авра́мка" (Avramka), "Авраа́ха" (Avraakha), "Авра́ха" (Avrakha), "Авраа́ша" (Avraasha), and "Авра́ша" (Avrasha).[3] The diminutives of "Abram" include "Абра́мка" (Abraamka), "Абра́ха" (Abrakha), and "Абра́ша" (Abrasha).[3] The diminutives of "Avram" include "Авра́мка" (Avramka), "Авра́ха" (Avrakha), "Авра́ша" (Avrasha), and "А́ва" (Ava).[3]

People with the given name Abram[edit]

People with the surname Abram[edit]

Variant forms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Nikonov, p. 96
  2. ^ NIV translation of the Bible, footnote to Genesis 17:5
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Petrovsky, p. 35
  4. ^ a b Superanskaya [1], p. 20
  5. ^ a b c Superanskaya [2], p. 30
  6. ^ Superanskaya [2], pp. 23 and 30

Sources[edit]

  • В. А. Никонов (V. A. Nikonov). "Ищем имя" (Looking for a Name). Изд. "Советская Россия". Москва, 1988. ISBN 5-268-00401-8
  • Н. А. Петровский (N. A. Petrovsky). "Словарь русских личных имён" (Dictionary of Russian First Names). ООО Издательство "АСТ". Москва, 2005. ISBN 5-17-002940-3
  • [1] А. В. Суперанская (A. V. Superanskaya). "Современный словарь личных имён: Сравнение. Происхождение. Написание" (Modern Dictionary of First Names: Comparison. Origins. Spelling). Айрис-пресс. Москва, 2005. ISBN 5-8112-1399-9
  • [2] А. В. Суперанская (A. V. Superanskaya). "Словарь русских имён" (Dictionary of Russian Names). Издательство Эксмо. Москва, 2005. ISBN 5-699-14090-5