Abstract particulars

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Abstract particulars are metaphysical entities which are both abstract objects and particulars.

Examples[edit]

Individual numbers are often classified as abstract particulars because they are neither concrete objects nor universals — they are particular things which do not themselves occur in space or time. Tropes are another example of entities cited as abstract particulars.

History[edit]

The concept of "abstract particularity" (German: abstrakte Besonderheit) was introduced in philosophy by G. W. F. Hegel.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel: The Science of Logic, Cambridge University Press, 2010, p. 609. See also: Richard Dien Winfield, Hegel's Science of Logic: A Critical Rethinking in Thirty Lectures, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2012, p. 265.

Further reading[edit]

  • Campbell, Keith, 1981. “The Metaphysic of Abstract Particulars,” Midwest Studies in Philosophy 6: 477–488.
  • Stout, G. F., 1921. “The Nature of Universals and Propositions,” The Problem of Universals, ed. Charles Landesman, New York: Basic Books, 1971: 154–166.
  • Stout, G. F., 1923 “Are the Characteristics of Particular Things Universal or Particular?,” The Problem of Universals, ed. Charles Landesman, New York: Basic Books, 1971: 178–183.
  • Rosen, Gideon (2001-07-19). "Abstract objects". Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.