Abu al-Yusr al-Bazdawi

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Abu al-Yusr al-Bazdawi
أبو الْيُسر الْبَزْدَوي
Personal
Born421 A.H. = 1030 A.D.
Died493 A.H. = 1100 A.D.
ReligionIslam
EraIslamic Golden Age
Region Uzbekistan
DenominationSunni
JurisprudenceHanafi
CreedMaturidi
Main interest(s)Aqidah, Kalam (Islamic theology), Fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence)
Notable work(s)Kitab Usul al-Din
Senior posting

Abu al-Yusr al-Bazdawi (Arabic: أبو الْيُسر الْبَزْدَوي‎), was a prominent Central Asian Hanafi-Maturidi scholar and a qadi (judge) in Samarqand in the late eleventh century and author of the Kitab Usul al-Din [Book of the Principles (Fundamentals) of Religion].[1][2]

Name[edit]

Abu al-Yusr Muhammad b. Muhammad b. al-Hussein b. 'Abd al-Karim b. Musa b. Mujahid al-Nasafi al-Bazdawi.[3]

The attribution al-Bazdawi indicates that he or his family originated from Bazda or Bazdawa, a small town with a castle on the road between Nasaf and Bukhara.[4]

Birth[edit]

He was born around the year 421 A.H. (1030 A.D.) and received his earliest education in Maturidism disciplines from his father.[5] His grandfather, Fakhr al-Islam al-Bazdawi and his brother were leading Hanafi scholars and authored many books.[6]

Students[edit]

Some of his well known students are: Najm al-Din 'Umar al-Nasafi, 'Ala' al-Din al-Samarqandi, and 'Ala al-Din al-Kasani.[7][8]

Works[edit]

He was the author of several works on law, including a commentary on the major work of Abu Hanifa, after whom the Hanafi school is named, and a commentary on a work of Abu Hanifa's student Muhammad al-Shaybani, who was one of the founders of the Hanafi school.[9]

Al-Bazdawi wrote many valuable works, the most important of these which remain is Usul al-Din (edited with a biographical introduction by Hans-Peter Linss).[10]

Al-Bazdawi’s Kitab Usul al-Din, as it was described by Hans-Peter Linss, could be classified in:[11]

  1. Firstly, a short review of all literatures of the heretics on dogma and theology in Islam.
  2. Secondly, Hanafi-Sunni orthodoxy defense against the dissenting opinions and teachings of the heretical sects.
  3. Finally, a study on the heterodox factions in Islam, their subdivisions and their most important heads.

Death[edit]

After serving for a period of time as a magistrate in Samarqand, he eventually moved to Bukhara and died there in 493 A.H. (1100 A.D.).[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Journal for the History of Arabic Science, Volumes 7-8. Institute for the History of Arabic Science, University of Aleppo. 1983. p. 4.
  2. ^ M. A. Muqtedar Khan (2006). Islamic Democratic Discourse: Theory, Debates, and Philosophical Perspectives. Lexington Books. p. 11. ISBN 9780739106457.
  3. ^ "Siyar A'lam al-Nubala'". Islamweb.net.
  4. ^ Journal for the History of Arabic Science, Volumes 7-8. Institute for the History of Arabic Science, University of Aleppo. 1983. p. 4.
  5. ^ Wan Jamaluddin. "AL-PALIMBANI'S THOUGHT IN HIS SUFISTIC WORK" (PDF). Study on Manuscript in Saint Petersburg-Russia tittled: «A Gift for those, who Seeks The Real Faith». p. 174.
  6. ^ "BAZDAWI ABU AL YUSR (421H/1030CE-493H/1100CE)". Islamic Encyclopedia.
  7. ^ Talal Al-Azem (2016). Rule-Formulation and Binding Precedent in the Madhhab-Law Tradition. Brill Publishers. p. 70. ISBN 9789004323292.
  8. ^ Sohaira Siddiqui (2019). Locating the Sharia: Legal Fluidity in Theory, History and Practice. Brill Publishers. p. 99. ISBN 9789004391710.
  9. ^ Journal for the History of Arabic Science, Volumes 7-8. Institute for the History of Arabic Science, University of Aleppo. 1983. p. 4.
  10. ^ The Pakistan Philosophical Journal, Volume 14. Pakistan Philosophical Congress. 1975. p. 18.
  11. ^ Wan Jamaluddin. "AL-PALIMBANI'S THOUGHT IN HIS SUFISTIC WORK" (PDF). Study on Manuscript in Saint Petersburg-Russia tittled: «A Gift for those, who Seeks The Real Faith». p. 174.
  12. ^ The Pakistan Philosophical Journal, Volume 14. Pakistan Philosophical Congress. 1975. p. 18.

External links[edit]