Acacia penninervis

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Acacia penninervis
Acacia penninervis 1.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Clade: Mimosoideae
Genus: Acacia
Species:
A. penninervis
Binomial name
Acacia penninervis
Synonyms
  • Acacia impressa Lindl.
  • Acacia penninervis Sieber
  • Acacia penninervis DC. var. impressa (Lindl.)Domin
  • Racosperma penninerve (DC.)Pedley[1]
  • Acacia impressa Lindl.[2]

Acacia penninervis, commonly known as hickory wattle, mountain hickory, or blackwood,[3] is a perennial shrub or tree 2–8m high,[4] which is native to Australia.

Its uses include environmental management.[1] The tannin content of the bark is approximately 18%.[5]

It occurs in the Australian states of Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria, and as an introduced species on New Zealand's North Island and South Island.[6][1] The variety A. p. var. penninervis occurs in the same Australian states of Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria.[7] The variety A. p. var. longiracemosa occurs in coastal districts of southern Queensland, and northern New South Wales.[8]

The 1889 book 'The Useful Native Plants of Australia’ records that common names included "Hickory" and "Blackwood" and that "The bark (and, according to some, the leaves) of this tree was formerly used by the aboriginals [sic.] of southern New South Wales for catching fish. They would throw them into a waterhole, when the fish would rise to the top and be easily caught. Neither the leaves nor bark contain strictly poisonous substances, but, like the other species of Acacia, they would be deleterious, owing to their astringency."[9]

Varieties[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c ILDIS LegumeWeb
  2. ^ "Synonyms of mountain-hickory (Acacia penninervis)". Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 2014-04-05.
  3. ^ "Common names for mountain-hickory (Acacia penninervis)". Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 2014-04-05.
  4. ^ PlantNet
  5. ^ von Mueller, Ferdinand (1884). Select extra-tropical plants readily eligible for industrial culture or naturalization. Detroit, Michigan: George S. Davis. p. 7.
  6. ^ "ABRS Flora of Australia Online Search Results: Acacia penninervis Sieber ex DC". Flora of Australia Online. Australian National Botanic Gardens. Retrieved 2014-03-29.
  7. ^ "ABRS Flora of Australia Online Search Results: Acacia penninervis Sieber ex DC. var. penninervis". Flora of Australia Online. Australian National Botanic Gardens. Retrieved 2014-03-29.
  8. ^ "ABRS Flora of Australia Online Search Results: Acacia penninervis var. longiracemosa Domin". Flora of Australia Online. Australian National Botanic Gardens. Retrieved 2014-03-29.
  9. ^ J. H. Maiden (1889). The useful native plants of Australia : Including Tasmania. Turner and Henderson, Sydney.

External links[edit]