Academic grading in Canada

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Academic grading in Canada varies by province, level of education (e.g., high school or university), institution (e.g., Queens), and faculty. The following are commonly used conversions from percentage grades to letter grades, however, this is not necessarily meaningful, since there is not a uniform scheme for assigning percentage grades either. A grade A would be 80-100% a B would be 70-79%.

Academic Grading[edit]

Alberta[edit]

In Alberta, academic grading follows a scale of letter grades (A through D), sentences to describe how well one's performance is to the curricular tasks expected of them, and percentages which are typically reserved for high school, college and university students.

A: 80%-100% (student has demonstrated an exemplary performance to what is expected)

B: 65%-79% (student has demonstrated a proficient performance to what is expected)

C: 50%-64% (student has demonstrated an adequate performance to what is expected)

D: 0%-49% (student has demonstrated a limited performance to what is expected)

IEA: Insufficient Evidence Available: indicates that the teacher of a particular course has not gathered enough evidence of a student's learning and thus, cannot give a grade for said student.

WDR: Withdrawal: indicted the student has withdrew from a particular course and thus, is given no grade because of it.

AMP: Academic Malpractice: Indicates that the student was placed in an incorrect class, whether it be by not having the pre-requiste or did not request the class upon registration. No mark is given.

P: Pass: indicates that the student has achieved the bare minimum grade to pass the class granted by a teacher due to reasons beyond the students control. A grade of P translates into a 50% when used to calculate averages for university or college admission.

A mark of 0%-49%, or a D, is a failure of a class and is typically given for high school and post-secondary students only, but can be given to junior high students too, but isn't typically done. A failing grade will also result in not earning credits for an Alberta High School Diploma or for any subject taken in post-secondary, and typically means the student will more than likely repeat the course.

British Columbia[edit]

[1]

Letter Percent
A 86% - 100%
B 73% - 85%
C+ 64% - 72%
C 60% - 63%
C- 50% - 59%
I 0% - 49%

[1] Letter Grade Interpretation:

A = The student demonstrates excellent or outstanding performance in relation to expected learning outcomes for the course or subject and grade.

B = The student demonstrates very good performance in relation to expected learning outcomes for the course or subject and grade.

C+ = The student demonstrates good performance in relation to expected learning outcomes for the course or subject and grade.

C = The student demonstrates satisfactory performance in relation to expected learning outcomes for the course or subject and grade.

C- = The student demonstrates minimally acceptable performance in relation to expected learning outcomes for the course or subject and grade.

I = (In Progress or Incomplete) The student, for a variety of reasons, is not demonstrating minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected learning outcomes. An "I" letter grade may only be assigned in accordance with section 3.

F = (Failed) The student has not demonstrated the minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected learning outcomes for the course or subject and grade. F (Failed) may only be used as a final letter grade if an "I" (In Progress) letter grade has been previously assigned or the "F" is assigned as a result of failing a provincially examinable course.

W = (Withdrawal) According to the policy of the board, and upon request of the parent of the student or, when appropriate, the student, the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school may grant permission to a student to withdraw from a course or subject.

SG = (Standing Granted) Although completion of normal requirements is not possible, a sufficient level of performance has been attained to warrant, consistent with the best interests of the student, the granting of standing for the course or subject and grade. Standing Granted may be used in cases of serious illness, hospitalization, late entry or early leaving, but may only be granted by an adjudication process authorized by the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of the school. Standing Granted may not be used for a course with a Required Graduation Program Examination. Standing Granted may not be used for Graduation Transitions.

(TS = Transfer Standing) May be granted by the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school on the basis of an examination of records from an institution other than a school as defined in the School Act. Alternatively, the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school may assign a letter grade on the basis of an examination of those records.

Many school districts in British Columbia have switched the reporting method from percentages to letter grades for Grades 8 - 9.

Manitoba[edit]

Letter Percent GPA
A+ 90% - 100% 4.0
A 80% - 89% 4.0
B 70% - 79% 3.0
C 60% - 69% 2.0
D 50% - 59% 1.0
F 0% - 49% 0.0


Senior 1-4 (Grade 9-12): Students need to obtain 30 credits in 4 years. When the student completes Senior 4, a class rank based on the curve will be put on his or her transcript.

Ontario[edit]

The grading standards for A-letter grades changed in September 2010 to coincide with a new academic year. The new changes require a higher percentage grade by two or five points to obtain an A or A+ respectively.[citation needed]

  • A (Level 4, beyond government standards) 80% and above
  • B (Level 3, at government standards) 70-79%
  • C (Level 2, approaching government standards) 60-69%
  • D (Level 1, well below government standards) 50-59%
  • R (Remedial standards, used from grades 1 to 8)
  • F (Failing standards-used in high schools), below 50%.[citation needed]
Letter Percent
(until August 2010)[2]
Percent
(since September 2010)[3]
A+ 90% - 100% 95% - 100%
A 85% - 89% 87% - 94%
A- 80% - 84% 80% - 86%
B+ 77% - 79%
B 73% - 76%
B- 70% - 72%
C+ 67% - 69%
C 63% - 66%
C- 60% - 62%
D+ 57% - 59%
D 53% - 56%
D- 50% - 52%
F 0% - 49%

Quebec[edit]

  • A+: 95 (Outstanding)
  • A: 90 (Outstanding)
  • A-: 85 (Excellent)
  • B+: 80 (Excellent)
  • B: 75 (Good)
  • B-: 70 (Good)
  • C+: 65 (Satisfactory)
  • C: 60 (Marginal Pass)
  • C-: 55 (Marginal Fail)
  • D+: 50 (Fail)
  • D: 45 (Fail)
  • D-: 40 (Fail)
  • F: 35 (Fail)

At a high school level, most subjects are separated in three competencies. On report cards, marks are normally shown as numbers and an average of the two marks associated to the subject will be calculated.[4] For example, if a student achieves A, A- and B+ in a subject, teachers will calculate an average of the three marks (in this case, 85%).

Quebec passing mark is 60% and not 50% as compared to some other provinces. Note that it is common practice for students to pass with grades in the range of 55% to 59% at the teacher's discretion. Also worth note the military pass mark is also generally 60%.

Note: Most schools in Quebec have now switched to percentages. The mark the students receives is the mark that is shown. The 60% passing mark remains.

Saskatchewan[edit]

  • A+: 90-100% (high honour roll)
  • A: 80-89% (honour roll)
  • B: 70-79%
  • C: 50-69%
  • Fail: 0-49%

Secondary schools (grades 10-12) submit percentage grades to the Ministry of Education. Any schools that provide letter grades may use any scale they choose and are not restricted to the scale shown above, as no guidelines are provided provincially. Individual schools or school divisions determine criteria for awards such as honour roll or high honour roll, this is not a province-wide designation. No such awards are recognized on the official transcripts that students receive from the Ministry of Education. Academic grading for all other grades is at the discretion of the local authority (e.g., school divisions). There is a wide variety a grading and reporting systems used throughout the province with no overarching guidelines or requirements. Many use a four point system of some sort, with descriptors such as "Exceeding expectations, meeting expectations, progessing toward expectations, not meeting expecations".


References[edit]