Academy Award for Technical Achievement

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The Technical Achievement Award is one of three Scientific and Technical Awards given from time to time by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. (The other two awards are the Scientific and Engineering Award and the Academy Award of Merit.)[1] The Technical Achievement Award is an honorary award that is given annually to those whose particular technical accomplishments have contributed to the progress of the motion picture industry.[2] The award is a certificate, which describes the achievement and lists the names of those being honored for the particular contribution.[2][3] These awards are usually given at a dinner ceremony held weeks prior to the Academy Awards broadcast and a brief excerpt is shown in the Oscars telecast.

Winners[edit]

See Category:Academy Award for Technical Achievement winners.
Technical Achievement Award Recipients from 1931/32 to 1999
Year Recipient(s) Department
1930/1931 (4th)
  • Sound
1931/1932 (5th)
  • Laboratory
1932/1933 (6th)
  • Special Photographic
1934 (7th)
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
1935 (8th)
  • To Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio for the development of anti-directional negative and positive development by means of jet turbulation, and the application of the method to all negative and print processing of the entire product of a major producing company.
  • To William A. Mueller of Warner Bros.-First National Studio Sound Department for his method of dubbing, in which the level of the dialogue automatically controls the level of the accompanying music and sound effects.
  • To Mole-Richardson Company for their development of the "Solar-spot" spot lamps.
  • To Douglas Shearer and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio Sound Department for their automatic control system for cameras and sound recording machines and auxiliary stage equipment.
  • To Electrical Research Products, Inc. for their study and development of equipment to analyze and measure flutter resulting from the travel of the film through the mechanisms used in the recording and reproduction of sound.
  • To Paramount Productions, Inc. for the design and construction of the Paramount transparency air turbine developing machine.
  • To Nathan Levinson, Director of Sound Recording for Warner Bros.-First National Studio, for the method of intercutting variable density and variable area sound tracks to secure an increase in the effective volume range of sound recorded for motion pictures.
  • Laboratory
  • Sound
  • Lighting
  • Stage Operations
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
  • Sound
1936 (9th)
  • To RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., for their development of a method of recording and printing sound records utilizing a restricted spectrum (known as ultra-violet light recording).
  • To Electrical Research Products, Inc. for the ERPI "Type Q" portable recording channel.
  • To RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., for furnishing a practical design and specifications for a non-slip printer.
  • To United Artists Studio Corp. for the development of a practical, efficient and quiet wind machine.
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
1937 (10th)
  • Photography
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
  • Sound
1938 (11th)
  • Sound
  • Special Photographic
1939 (12th)
  • Lighting
  • Camera Cranes
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
  • Laboratory
  • Lighting
  • Laboratory
  • Special Photographic
1940 (13th)
  • Stage Operations
1941 (14th)
  • Film
  • Sound
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Sound
1942 (15th)
  • Special Photographic
  • Laboratory
1943 (16th)
  • Sound
  • Photography
  • Special Photographic
  • Sound
1944 (17th)
  • Laboratory
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Stage Operations
  • Photography
  • Sound
  • Stage Operations
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
  • Special Photographic
1945 (18th)
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
1946 (19th)
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
  • Lighting
  • Sound
  • Lighting
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
1947 (20th)
  • Sound
  • Lighting
  • Special Photographic
  • Sound
  • Lighting
1948 (21st)
  • Lighting
  • Stage Operations
1949 (22nd)
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Camera
  • Editorial
  • Photography
  • Projection
1950 (23rd)
  • No award

1951 (24th)
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Editorial
1952 (25th)
  • Special Photographic
  • Sound
  • Photography
  • Editorial
  • Sound
1953 (26th)
  • Editorial
1954 (27th)
  • Special Photographic
  • Photography
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Projection
  • Stage Operations
1955 (28th)
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Props
  • Camera Cranes
  • Lighting
  • Projection
  • Special Photographic
1956 (29th)
  • Laboratory
  • Camera
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Photography
1957 (30th)
  • Stage Operations
1958 (31st)
  • To Willy Borberg of the General Precision Laboratory, Inc., for the development of a high speed intermittent movement for 35mm motion picture theatre projection equipment.
  • To Fred Ponedel, George Brown, Conrad Boye of the Warner Bros. Special Effects Department for the design and fabrication of a new rapid fire marble gun.
  • Projection
  • Stage Operations
1959 (32nd)
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
1960 (33rd)
  • Photography
  • Stage Operations
  • Laboratory
1961 (34th)
  • To Hurletron, Inc., Electric Eye Equipment Division, for an automatic light changing system for motion picture printers.
  • To Wadsworth E. Pohl and Technicolor Corp. for an integrated sound and picture transfer process.
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
1962 (35th)
  • To Electro-Voice, Inc., for a highly directional dynamic line microphone.
  • To Louis G. MacKenzie for a selective sound effects repeater.
  • Sound
  • Sound
1963 (36th)
  • Special Photographic
1964 (37th)
  • Lighting
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Photography
1965 (38th)
  • No award

1966 (39th)
  • To Panavision, Incorporated, for the design of the Panatron Power Inverter and its application to motion picture camera operation.
  • To Carroll Knudson for the production of a Composer's Manual for Motion Picture Music Synchronization.
  • To Ruby Raksin for the production of a Composer's Manual for Motion Picture Music Synchronization.
  • Stage Operations
  • Editorial
  • Editorial
1967 (40th)
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Camera
  • Sound
  • Sound
1968 (41st)
  • Laboratory
  • Film
1969 (42nd)
  • Sound
  • Lighting
  • Camera
  • Stage Operations
1970 (43rd)
  • To Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. for the development and introduction of a series of compact tungsten halogen lamps for motion picture production.
  • To B.J. Losmandy for the concept, design and application of micro-miniature solid state amplifier modules used in motion picture recording equipment.
  • To Eastman Kodak Company and Photo Electronics Corporation for the design and engineering of an improved video color analyzer for motion picture laboratories.
  • To Electro Sound Incorporated for the design and introduction of the Series 8000 Sound System for motion picture theatres.
  • Lighting
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
  • Sound
1971 (44th)
  • To Thomas Jefferson Hutchinson, James R. Rochester, Fenton Hamilton for the development and introduction of the Sunbrute system of xenon arc lamps for location lighting in motion picture production.
  • To Photo Research Corporation, a division of Kollmorgen Corporation, for the development and introduction of the film-lens balanced Three Color Meter.
  • To Robert D. Auguste and Cinema Products Company for the development and introduction of a new crystal controlled lightweight motor for the 35mm motion picture Arriflex camera.
  • To Producers Service Corporation and Consolidated Film Industries, Cinema Research Corporation and to Research Products, Inc. for the engineering and implementation of fully automated blow-up motion picture printing systems.
  • To Cinema Products Company for a control motor to actuate zoom lenses on motion picture cameras.
  • Lighting
  • Photography
  • Camera
  • Laboratory
  • Camera
1972 (45th)
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Props
  • Projection
1973 (46th)
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Lenses and Filters
1974 (47th)
  • To The Elemack Company, Rome, Italy, for the design and development of their Spyder camera dolly.
  • To Louis Ami of Universal City Studios for the design and construction of a reciprocating camera platform used when photographing special visual effects for motion pictures.
  • Camera Cranes
  • Stage Operations
1975 (48th)
  • To Lawrence W. Butler and Roger Banks for the concept of applying low inertia and stepping electric motors to film transport systems and optical printers for motion picture production.
  • To David Degenkolb and Fred Scobey of Deluxe General Incorporated and John C. Dolan and Richard Dubois of the Akwaklame Company for the development of a technique for silver recovery from photographic wash-waters by ion exchange.
  • To Joseph Westheimer for the development of a devic to obtain shadowed titles on motion picture films.
  • To Carter Equipment Company, Inc. and Ramtronics for the engineering and manufacture of a computerized tape punching system for programming laboratory printing machines.
  • To Hollywood Film Company for the engineering and manufacture of a computerized tape punching system for programming laboratory printing machines.
  • To Bell & Howell for the engineering and manufacture of a computerized tape punching system for programming laboratory printing machines.
  • To Fredrik Schlyter for the engineering and manufacture of a computerized tape punching system for programming laboratory printing machines.
  • Special Photographic
  • Laboratory
  • Special Photographic
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
1976 (49th)
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Photography
1977 (50th)
  • To Ernst F. Nettman of the Astrovision Division of Continental Camera Systems, Incorporated, for the engineering of its Periscope Aerial Camera System.
  • To EECO (Electronic Engineering Company of California) for developing a method for interlocking non-sprocketed film and tape media used in motion picture production.
  • To Dr. Bernhard Kühl and Werner Block of OSRAM, GmbH, for the development of the HMI high-efficiency discharge lamp for motion picture lighting.
  • To Panavision, Incorporated for the design of Panalite, a camera-mounted controllable light for motion picture photography.
  • To Panavision, Incorporated for the engineering of the Panahead gearhead for motion picture cameras.
  • To Piclear, Inc, for originating and developing an attachment to motion picture projectors to improve screen image quality.
  • Camera
  • Systems
  • Lighting
  • Lighting
  • Stage Operations
  • Laboratory
1978 (51st)
  • To Karl Macher and Glenn M. Berggren of Isco Optische Werke for the development and introduction of the Cinelux-ULTRA Lens for 35mm Motion Picture Projection.
  • To David J. Degenkolb, Arthur L. Forde and Fred J. Scobey of DeLuxe General, Incorporated, for the development of a Metho to Recycle Motion Picture Laboratory Photographic Wash Waters by Ion Exchange.
  • To Kiichi Sekiguchi of CINE-FI International for the development of the CINE-FI Auto Radio Sound System for Drive-In Theaters.
  • To Leonard Chapman of Leonard Equipment Company, for the design and manufacture of a small, mobile, motion picture camera platform known as the Chapman Hustler Dolly.
  • To James L. Fisher of J.L. Fisher, Incorporated, for the design and manufacture of a small, mobile, motion picture camera platform known as the Fisher Model Ten Dolly.
  • To Robert Stindt of Production Grip Equipment Company, for the design and manufacture of a small, mobile, motion picture camera platform known as the Stindt Dolly.
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Laboratory
  • Systems
  • Camera Cranes
  • Camera Cranes
  • Camera Cranes
1979 (52nd)
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Projection
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Photography
  • Cartoon Process
  • Lighting
1980 (53rd)
  • To Carter Equipment Company for the development of a continuous contact, total immersion, additive color motion picture printer.
  • To Hollywood Film Company for the development of a continuous contact, total immersion, additive color motion picture printer.
  • To fr:André Debrie for the development of a continuous contact, total immersion, additive color motion picture printer.
  • To Charles Vaughn and Eugene Nottingham of Cinetron Computer Systems, Incorporated, for the development of a versatile general purpose computer system for animation and optical effects motion picture photography.
  • To John W. Lang, Walter Hrastnik and Charles J. Watson of Bell and Howell Company for the development and manufacture of a modular continuous contact motion picture film printer.
  • To Worth Baird of LaVezzi Machine Works, Incorporated, for the advanced design and manufacture of a film sprocket for motion picture projectors.
  • To Peter Regla and Dan Slater of Elicon for the development of a follow-focus system for motion picture optical effects printers and animation stands.
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Systems
  • Laboratory
  • Projection
  • Photography
1981 (54th)
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Camera
  • Special Photographic
  • Camera
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
1982 (55th)
  • To Richard W. Deats for the design and manufacture of the "Little Big Crane" for motion picture production.
  • To Cons Tresfon and Adriaan De Rooy of Egripment, and to Ed Phillips and Carlos DeMattos of Matthews Studio Equipment, Incorporated, for the design and manufacture of the "Tulip Crane" for motion picture production.
  • To Bran Ferren of Associates and Ferren for the design and development of a computerized lightning effect system for motion picture photography.
  • To Christie Electric Corp. and LaVezzi Machine Works, Inc. for the design and manufacture of the Ultramittent film transport for Christie motion picture projectors.
  • Camera Cranes
  • Camera Cranes
  • Stage Operations
  • Projection
1983 (56th)
  • To William G. Krokaugger of Mole-Richardson Company for the design and engineering of a portable, 12,000 watt, lighting-control dimmer for use in motion picture production.
  • To Charles L. Watson, Larry L. Langrehr and John H. Steiner for the development of the BHP (electro-mechanical) fader for use on continuous motion picture contact printers.
  • To Elizabeth D. De La Mare of De La Mare Engineering, Incorporated, for the progressive development and continuous research of special effects pyrotechnics originally designed by Glenn W. De La Mare for motion picture production.
  • To Douglas Fries, John Lacey and Michael Sicrist for the design and engineering of a 35mm reflex conversion camera system for special effects photography.
  • To Jack Cashin of Ultra-Stereo Labs, Incorporated, for the engineering and development of a 4-channel, stereophonic, decoding system for optical motion picture sound track reproduction.
  • To David J. Degenkolb for the design and development of an automated device used in the silver recovery process in motion picture laboratories.
  • Lighting
  • Laboratory
  • Stage Operations
  • Camera
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
1984 (57th)
  • To Nat Tiffen of Tiffen Manufacturing Corporation for the production of high-quality, durable, laminated color filters for motion picture photography.
  • To Don Trumbull, Jonathan Erland, Stephen Fog and Paul Burk of Apogee, Incorporated, for the design and development of the "Blue Max" high-power, blue-flux projector for traveling matte composite photography.
  • To Jonathan Erland and Robert Bealmear of Apogee, Incorporated, for an innovative design for front projection screens and an improved method for their construction.
  • To Howard J. Preston of Preston Cinema Systems for the design and development of a variable speed control device with automatic exposure compensation for motion picture cameras.
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Camera
1985 (58th)
  • To David W. Spencer for the development of an Animation Photo Transfer (APT) process.
  • To Harrison & Harrison, Optical Engineers, for the invention and development of Harrison Diffusion filters for motion picture photography.
  • To Larry Barton of Cinematography Electronics, Inc., for a Precision Speed Crystal-Controlled Device for motion picture photography.
  • To Alan Landaker of The Burbank Studios for the Mark III Camera Drive for motion picture photography.
  • Cartoon Process
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Camera
  • Camera
1986 (59th)
  • To Lee Electric (Lightning) Ltd. for the design and development of an electronic, flicker-free, discharge lamp control system.
  • To Peter Parks of Oxford Scientific Films' Image Quest Division for the development of a live aero-compositor for special effects photography.
  • To Matt Sweeney and Lucinda Strub for the development of an automatic capsule gun for simulating bullet hits for motion picture special effects.
  • To Carl E. Holmes of Carl E. Holmes Company and to Alexander Bryce of The Burbank Studios for the development of a mobile DC power supply unit for motion picture production photography.
  • To Bran Ferren of Associates and Ferren for the development of a laser synchro-cue system for applications in the motion picture industry.
  • To John L. Baptista of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Laboratories, Inc. for the development and installation of a computerized silver recovery operation.
  • to David W. Samuelson for the development of programs incorporated into a pocket computer for motion picture cinematographers, and to William B. Pollard for contributing new algorithms on which the programs are based.
  • To Hal Landaker and Alan Landaker of The Burbank Studios for the development of the Beat System low-frequency cue track for motion picture production sound recording.
  • Lighting
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Lighting
  • Special Photographic
  • Laboratory
  • Photography
  • Sound
1987 (60th)
  • Sound
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Camera
1988 (61st)
  • To Grant Loucks of Alan Gordon Enterprises Incorporated for the design concept, and to Geoffrey H. Williamson of Wilcam for the mechanical and electrical engineering, of the Image 300 35mm High-Speed Motion Picture Camera.
  • To Michael V. Chewey III for the development of the motion picture industry's first paper tape reader incorporating microprocessor technology.
  • To BHP, Inc., successor to the Bell & Howell Professional Equipment Division, for the development of a high-speed reader incorporating microprocessor technology for motion picture laboratories.
  • To Hollywood Film Company for the development of a high-speed reader incorporating microprocessor technology for motion picture laboratories.
  • To Bruce W. Keller and Manfred G. Michelson of Technical Film Systems for the design and development of a high-speed light valve controller and constant current power supply for motion picture laboratories.
  • To Dr. Antal Lisziewicz and Glenn M. Berggren of ISCO-Optic GmbH for the design and development of the Ultra-Star series of motion picture lenses.
  • To James K. Branch of Spectra Cine, Incorporated, and to William L. Blowers and Nasir J. Zaidi for the design and development of the Spectra CineSpot one-degree spotmeter for measuring the brightness of motion picture screens.
  • To Bob Badami, Dick Bernstein and Bill Bernstein of Offbeat Systems for the design and development of the Streamline Scoring System, Mark IV, for motion picture music editing.
  • To Gary Zeller of Zeller International Limited for the development of Zel-Jel fire protection barrier for motion picture stunt work.
  • To Emanual Trilling of Trilling Resources Limited for the development of Stunt-Gel fire protection barrier for motion picture stunt work.
  • To Paul A. Roos for the invention of a method known as Video Assist, whereby a scene being photographed on motion picture film can be viewed on a monitor and/or recorded on video tape.
  • Camera
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Photography
  • Editorial
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Systems
1989 (62nd)
  • To Dr. Leo Cattozzo for the design and development of the CIR-Catozzo Self-Perforating Adhesive Tape Film Splicer.
  • To Magna-Tech Electronics Company for the introduction of the first remotely controlled Advance/Retard function for magnetic film sound dubbing.
  • Editorial
  • Sound
1990 (63rd)
  • ToWilliam L. Blowers of Belco Associates, Incorporated and Thomas F. Denove for the development and manufacture of the Belco/Denove Cinemeter. This digital/analog exposure meter was specifically and uniquely designed for the cinematographer.
  • To Iain Neil for optical design; Takuo Miyagishima for the mechanical design; and Panavision, Incorporated for the concept and development of the Primo Series of spherical prime lenses for 35mm cinematography.
  • To Christopher Gilman, Harvey Hubert Jr. of the Diligent Dwarves Effects Lab for the development of the Actor Climate System, consisting of heat-transferring undergarments.
  • To Jim Graves of J&G Enterprises for the development of the Cool Suit System, consisting of heat-transferring undergarments.
  • To Bengt O. Orhall, Kenneth Lund, Bjorn Selin and Kjell Högberg of AB Film-Teknik for the development and manufacture of the Mark IV film subtitling processor, which has increased the speed, simplified the operation and improved the quality of subtitling.
  • To Richard Mula and Pete Romano of HydroImage, Incorporated, for the development of the SeaPar 1200 watt HMI Underwater Lamp.
  • To Dedo Weigert of Dedo Weigert Film GmbH for the development of the Dedolight, a miniature low-voltage tungsten-halogen lighting fixture.
  • To Dr Fred Kolb Jr., Paul Preo for the concept and development of a 35mm projection test film.
  • To Peter Baldwin for the design; Dr. Paul Kiankhooy and the Lightmaker Company for the development of the Lightmaker AC/DC HMI Ballast.
  • To the All-Union Cinema and Photo Research Institute (NIKFI) for continuously improving and providing 3-D presentations to Soviet motion picture audiences for the last 25 years.
  • Photography
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Laboratory
  • Lighting
  • Lighting
  • Film
  • Lighting
  • Systems
1991 (64th)
  • To Robert W. Stoker Jr., for the design and development of a cobweb gun, for applying non-toxic cobweb effects on motion picture sets with both safety and ease of operation.
  • To James Doyle for the design and development of the Dry Fogger, which uses liquid nitrogen to produce a safe, dense, low-hanging fog effects.
  • To Dick Cavdek, Steve Hamerski and Otto Nemenz International, Incorporated for the opto-mechanical design and development of the Canon/Nemenz Zoom Lens.
  • To Ken Robings and Clairmont Camera for the opto-mechanical design and development of the Canon/Clairmont Camera Zoom Lens.
  • To Century Precision Optics for the opto-mechanical design and development of the Canon/Century Precision Optics Zoom Lens.
  • Stage Operations
  • Stage Operations
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Lenses and Filters
1992 (65th)
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Sound
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Special Photographic
1993 (66th)
  • Lighting
  • Lighting
  • Stage Operations
  • Sound
  • Laboratory
1994 (67th)
  • To B. Russell Hessey of Special Effects Spectacular, Inc. and Vincent T. Kelton for the hardware design and George Jackman of De La Mare Engineering, Inc. for the pyrotechnic development which together comprise the non-gun safety blank firing system.
  • To Frieder Hocheim, Gary H. Swink, Dr. Joe Zhou, Don Northrop for the development of the Kino Flo Portable, Flicker Free, High Output Fluorescent Lighting System for motion picture set illumination.
  • To Emmanuel Previnaire of Flying-Cam for his pioneering concept and for the development of mounting a motion picture camera on a remotely-controlled miniature helicopter.
  • To Jacques Sax of Sonosax for the design and development of the Sonosax SX-S portable audio mixer.
  • To Clay Davis and John Carter of Todd-AO Corporation for the pioneering effort of computer controlled list management style ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement).
  • To Stephen W. Potter, John Asman, Charles Pell and Richard Larson of LarTec Systems for the advancement and refinement of the computer controlled list management style ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement) system via the LarTec ADR System that has established itself as a standard of the industry.
  • To Audio Tracks, Inc. for the design and development of the ADE (Advanced Data Encoding) System which creates an encoded timecode track and database during the initial transfer of the production sound "dailies."
  • To Colin Broad of CB Electronics for the design and development of the EDL (Edit Decision List) Lister which creates an encoded timecode track and database during the initial transfer of the production sound "dailies."
  • To Dieter Sturm of Sturm's Special Effects Int'l for the creation and development of the Bio-Snow 2 Flake.
  • To David A. Addleman and Lloyd A. Addleman for the development of the Cyberware 3030 3D Digitizer.
  • To Mark R. Schneider, Herbert R. Jones, Christopher D. Conover and John R.B. Brown for the development of the Polhemus 3 Space Digitizing System.
  • To Jack Smith, Michael Crichton and Emil Safier for pioneering computerized motion picture budgeting and scheduling.
  • To Stephen Greenfield and Chris Huntley of Screenplay Systems for development of the "Scriptor" software.
  • To Art Fritzen of the California Fritzen Propeller Company as the designer and sole manufacturer of the Eight-Bladed Ritter Fan Propellers.
  • To Dr. Mike Boudry of the Computer Film Company for his pioneering work in the field of film input scanning.
  • Stage Operations
  • Lighting
  • Photography
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Stage Operations
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Editorial and Pre-production
  • Editorial and Pre-production
  • Stage Operations
  • Special Photographic
1995 (68th)
  • To Pascal Chedeville for the design of the L.C. Concept Digital Sound System for motion picture exhibition.
  • To James Deas of the Warner Bros. Studio Facility for the design and subsequent development of an Automated Patchbay and Metering System for motion picture sound transfer and dubbing operations.
  • To Clay Davis and John Carter of Todd-AO Corporation for their pioneering efforts in creating an Automated Patchbay System for motion picture sound transfer and dubbing operations.
  • To Al Jensen, Chuck Headley, Jean Messner, Hazem Nabulsi of CEI Technology for producing a self-contained, flicker-free Color Video-Assist Camera.
  • To Peter Denz of Präzisions-Entwicklung Denz for developing a flicker-free Color Video-Assist Camera.
  • To David Pringle, Yan Zhong Fang for the design and development of "Lightning Strikes," a flexible, high-performance electronic lightning effect system.
  • To BHP, Incorporated. for their pioneering efforts developing Digital Sound Printing Heads for motion pictures.
  • To Joe Finnegan (a.k.a. Joe Yrigoyen) for his pioneering work in developing the Air Ram for motion picture stunt effects.
  • To Gary Demos, David Ruhoff, Can Cameron and Michelle Feraud for their pioneering efforts in the creation of the Digital Productions Digital Film Compositing System.
  • To Douglas Smythe, Lincoln Hu, Douglas S. Kay and Industrial Light and Magic for their pioneering efforts in the creation of the ILM Digital Film Compositing System.
  • To the Computer Film Company for their pioneering efforts in the creation of the CFC Digital Film Compositing System.
  • To Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse for the concept; Kodak Pathe CTP Cine for the prototype; and Eclair Laboratories and Martineau Industries for the development and further implementation of the Toulouse Electrolytic Silver Recovery Cell.
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Camera
  • Camera
  • Stage Operations
  • Sound
  • Stage Operations
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Laboratory
1996 (69th)
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Cartoon Process
  • Photography
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Camera Cranes
1997 (70th)
  • Projection
  • Sound
  • Stage Operations
  • Laboratory
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Stage Operations
  • Projection
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
1998 (71st)
  • To Garrett Brown and Jerry Holway for the creation of the Skyman flying platform for Steadicam operators. This cable-driven, manned camera platform allows the operator to spin 360 degrees for unimpeded pans while controlling the downhill speed via brakes. As a device for achieving otherwise impossible shots, Skyman has had a definite influence on later cable-suspended camera systems.
  • To Jim Rodnunsky, Jim Webber and Bob Webber of Cablecam Systems, and Trou Bayliss for the design and engineering of Cablecam. This radio-controlled, cable-driven camera platform with its ultra-smooth synthetic cables and powerful hydraulic motors, enables runs in excess of 3000 feet with quick return to start. Operating unmanned, it can function at speeds and through perils that would be unsafe for on-board operators.
  • To David DiFrancesco, N. Balasubramanian, Tom Noggle for their pioneering efforts in the development of laser film recording technology. This pioneering laser film recorder, designed and used for motion pictures, demonstrated the potential of this technology for recording digital data onto intermediate film stock.
  • To Mike MacKenzie, Mike Bolles, Udo Pampel, Joseph Fulmer of Industrial Light & Magic for their pioneering work in motion-controlled, silent camera dollies. This silent, high-speed motion control modification of a Panther dolly makes it possibl to film moving camera composite shots of actors while recording live dialogue.
  • To Barry Walton, Bill Schultz, Chris Barker and David Cornelius of Sony Pictures Imageworks for the creation of an advanced motion-controlled, silent camera dolly. This extensive modification to the Panther dolly allows high-speed moves to be silent, smooth and stable.
  • To Bruce Wilton and Carlos Icinkoff of Mechanical Concepts for their modular system of motion-control rotators and movers for use in motion-control. These components have become the de facto industry standard for use in precision motion control equipment.
  • To Remy Smith for the software and electronic design and development; and James K. Branch and Nasir J. Zaidi for the design and development of the Spectra Professional IV-A digital exposure meter. The design and execution of the Spectra Professional IV-A meter has resulted in a practical and successful tool for the film production community.
  • To Ivan Kruglak for his commitment to the development of a wireless transmission system for video-assisted images for the motion picture industry. Through years of persistent effort, Mr. Kruglak has commercialized and popularized a technique of great utility for motion picture camera operations. By introducing diversity antennas and a time code insertion accessory, he has optimized camera wireless video-assist components.
  • To Dr. Douglas R. Roble for his contribution to tracking technology and for the design and implementation of the TRACK system for camera position calculation and scene reconstruction. The TRACK system is an integrated software tool that uses computer-vision techniques to extract critical 2D and 3D information about a scene and the camera use to film it.
  • To Thaddeus Beier for the design and implementation of ras_track, a system for 2D tracking, stabilization, and 3D camera and object tracking. Ras_track allows the user to determine the position and location of the camera and objects in a scene by tracking points in a scanned sequence.
  • To Manfred N. Klemme and Donald E. Wetzel for the design and development of the K-Tek Microphone Boom Pole and accessories for on-set motion picture sound recording. The K-TEK series microphone boom pole provides production recording personnel with a self-lubricated, light-weight, sturdy pole with multiple accessories.
  • To Nick Foster for his software development in the field of water simulation systems. This software technique provides an efficient and flexible method for the creation of flowing streams, oceans, tidal waves and turbulence for motion picture visual effects.
  • To Cary Phillips for the design and development of the "Caricature" Animation System at Industrial Light & Magic By integrating existing tools into a powerful interactive system, and adding an expressive multi-target shape interpolation-based freeform animation system, the "Caricature" system provides a degree of subtlety and refinement not possible with other systems.
  • To Dr. Mitchell J. Bogdanowicz of the Eastman Kodak Company, and Jim Meyer and Stan Miller of Rosco Laboratories, Inc. for the design of the CalColor Calibrated Color Effects Filters. Designe to correspond to the spectral sensitivity of color negative film stocks, these filters provide for improved color control in motion picture lighting.
  • To Dr. A. Tulsi Ram, Richard C. Sehlin, Dr. Carl F. Holtz, David F. Kopperl of the Eastman Kodak Company for the research and development of the concept of molecular sieves applied to improve the archival properties of processed photographic film. The use of zeolite crystals as molecular sieves to absorb moisture, acetic acid, methylene chloride and a variety of solvents created an effective deterrent to the effects of vinegar syndrome in stored film stock.
  • To Takuo Miyagishima and Albert K. Saiki of Panavision, Incorporated for the design and development of the Eyepiece Leveler. This leveler keeps the camera eyepiece at the same level, regardless of whether the camera position is tilted up or down, enabling the camera operator to concentrate on the composition of the image.
  • To Edmund M. Di Giulio and James Bartell of Cinema Products for the design of the KeyKode Sync Reader. The KeyKode Sync Reader provides a fast, accurate and user-friendly means of utilizing the KeyKode information on film, thereby expediting the editorial and post-production processes.
  • To Ivan Kruglak for his pioneering concept and the development of the Coherent Time Code Slate. Time code slates have had significant impact on the filmmaking process by simplifying post-production. This development makes the synchronization process faster and more precise, particularly when multiple cameras are used.
  • To Mike Denecke for refining and further developing electronic time code slates. Due to their features and simplified operational procedures, the Denecke slates have had significant impact on the motion picture industry and have become the standard for electronic time code slates.
  • To Ed Zwaneveld and Frederick Gasoi of the National Film Board of Canada, and Mike Lazaridis and Dale Brubacher-Cressman of Research in Motion for the design and development of the DigiSync Film KeyKode Reader. The DigiSync Film KeyKode Reader provides a fast, accurate and user-friendly means of utilizing the KeyKode information on film, expediting the editorial and post-production processes.
  • Camera Cranes
  • Camera Cranes
  • Special Photographic
  • Camera Cranes
  • Camera Cranes
  • Camera Cranes
  • Photography
  • Camera
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Sound
  • Special Photographic
  • Special Photographic
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Laboratory
  • Camera
  • Laboratory
  • Editorial and Pre-production
  • Editorial and Pre-production
  • Laboratory
1999 (72nd)
  • To Vivienne Dyer and Chris Woolf for the design and development of the Rycote Microphone Windshield Modular System. Designe to eliminate physical acoustical rumble and to mask a microphone's high sensitivity to wind and other unwanted noises, the lightweight and rugged Rycote Microphone Windshields accomplish these tasks without altering or impairing the original frequency response of the microphone.
  • To Leslie Drever for the design and development of the Light Wave microphone windscreens and isolation mounts from Light Wave Systems. Designe to eliminate physical acoustical rumble and to cover a microphone's high sensitivity to wind and other unwanted noises, the Light Wave Systems line of shock mounts and windscreens accomplish these tasks without altering or impairing the original frequency response of the microphone.
  • To Richard C. Sehlin for the concept, and Dr. Mitchell J. Bogdanowicz and Mary L. Schmoeger of the Eastman Kodak Company for the design and development of the Eastman Lamphouse Modification Filters. The ELM Filters enable a laboratory to achieve additive printer contrast and color reproduction using a subtractive lamphouse.
  • To Hoyt Yeatman, Jr. of Dream Quest Images and John C. Brewer of the Eastman Kodak Company for the identification and diagnosis leading to the elimination of the "red fringe" artifact in traveling matte composite photography. The elimination of the "red fringe" artifact in traveling matte composite photography obviates expensive additional computerized image processing thus reducing the time involved in producing a seamless and convincing composite shot.
  • Sound
  • Sound
  • Lenses and Filters
  • Laboratory

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2017-02-27.
  2. ^ a b "Technical Achievement Award". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2017-02-27.
  3. ^ Skip the first hyperlink ("Technical Achievement Award"), which no longer functions, and instead go to the second hyperlink ("Archived"). "Technical Achievement Award". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 2008-06-22. Retrieved 2008-08-01. Technical Achievement Awards may be made for those accomplishments that contribute to the progress of the industry. A certificate is printed describing the achievement and listing the names of all of the individuals who contributed to its development.

External links[edit]

  • "Technical Achievement Award" – Description and photograph of this Academy Award on the official website of the Academy Awards (oscars.org). Lefthand menu links to these other related Honorary Awards; top menu includes links to home page and searchable Official Academy Award Database, with information about the winners of these awards and their official Academy Award citations.