Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges

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Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges
Accsc-logounit.png
AbbreviationACCSC
52-1828939[1]
Legal status501(c)(3) nonprofit organization
PurposeTo provide institutional accreditation for post-secondary career schools and colleges.[1]
HeadquartersArlington, Virginia, U.S.
Coordinates38°53′33″N 77°05′05″W / 38.892502°N 77.084693°W / 38.892502; -77.084693Coordinates: 38°53′33″N 77°05′05″W / 38.892502°N 77.084693°W / 38.892502; -77.084693
Michale S. McComis[2]
Associate Executive Director
Christopher Lambert[2]
Chair of the Commission
Mollie Ludwig[3]
Revenue (2017)
$7,294,513[1]
Expenses (2017)$6,480,858[1]
Employees (2016)
33[1]
Volunteers (2016)
96[1]
Websitewww.accsc.org

The Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC) is a private, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in the United States that provides accreditation to private post-secondary educational institutions. It is recognized by the United States Department of Education as an independent accrediting agency.[4] Established in 1965,[5] it is based in Arlington, Virginia.

The U.S. Department of Education identifies the scope of ACCSC recognition as the accreditation of private post-secondary institutions offering non-degree programs or associate, bachelor's and master's degrees in programs that are "predominantly organized to educate students for occupational, trade and technical careers, and institutions that offer programs via distance education."[6]

As of 2010, ACCSC reported that it extended accreditation to 789 schools with a combined enrollment of more than 250,000 students.[7]

The University of Northern New Jersey, which claimed to have been accredited by the commission, never actually offered any classes. The University of Northern New Jersey was actually a front organization used by federal investigators to trap individuals engaged in student visa fraud[8] The executive director of the ACCSC stated that it had listed the University of Northern New Jersey as being accredited on its website in order to cooperate with the federal investigation.[9]

The University of Farmington was another front organization used by federal investigators to trap individuals engaged in student visa fraud. Federal prosecutors said that over 600 students enrolled at the University of Farmington only to obtain a visa to the United States and not to actually study. The ACCSC also listed the University of Farmington as having been accredited.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Form 990: Return of Organization Exempt from Tax". Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges. Guidestar. June 30, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Leadership Team Biographies". Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  3. ^ "Commissioner Biographies". Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  4. ^ Accreditation in the United States: Regional and National Institutional Accrediting Agencies, U.S. Department of Education, retrieved February 28, 2012
  5. ^ "Overview / About". ACCSC Website. Retrieved June 14, 2012.
  6. ^ "Accreditation in the United States: Regional and National Institutional Accrediting Agencies". U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved February 28, 2012.
  7. ^ "Testimony of Dr. Michale S. McComis Before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions" (PDF). Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. United States Senate. August 4, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2012.
  8. ^ Robbins, Liz (April 6, 2016). "New Jersey University Was Fake, but Visa Fraud Arrests Are Real". The New York Times. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  9. ^ Robbins, Liz (May 5, 2016). "Students at Fake University Say They Were Collateral Damage in Sting Operation". The New York Times.

External links[edit]