Acetohydroxamic acid

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Acetohydroxamic acid
Acetohydroxamic acid.svg
Acetohydroxamic-acid-3D-balls.png
Clinical data
Trade names Lithostat
AHFS/Drugs.com Consumer Drug Information
ATC code
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.104 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C2H5NO2
Molar mass 75.07 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
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Acetohydroxamic acid (also known as AHA or by the trade name Lithostat) is a drug that is a potent and irreversible enzyme inhibitor of the urease enzyme in various bacteria and plants; it is usually used for urinary tract infections. The molecule is similar to urea but is not hydrolyzable by urease;[1] it thus disrupts the bacteria's metabolism through competitive inhibition.

Orphan drug[edit]

In 1983 the US Food and Drug Administration approved acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) as an orphan drug for "prevention of so-called struvite stones" under the newly enacted Orphan Drug Act of 1983.[2] AHA cannot be patented because it is a standard chemical compound.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fishbein, W; Carbone, P (1965). "Urease catalysis. ii. Inhibition of the enzyme by hydroxyurea, hydroxylamine, and acetohydroxamic acid". J Biol Chem. 240: 2407–2414. PMID 14304845.
  2. ^ a b Marwick, Charles (1983). "New drugs selectively inhibit kidney stone formation". The Journal of the American Medical Association. 240 (3): 321–322. doi:10.1001/jama.1983.03340030003001.