Achebe (comics)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Achebe
Achebe Black Panther.jpg
Achebe in Deadpool Vol. 2, #43 (August 2000)
Art by Jim Calafiore
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Black Panther Vol. 3, #3 (January 1999)
Created by Christopher Priest (writer)
Mark Texeira (artist)
In-story information
Alter ego Reverend Doctor Michael Ibn al-hajj Achebe, PhD
Species Human
Place of origin Earth
Team affiliations Xcon
Notable aliases Bob

Achebe is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Primarily an enemy of the Black Panther,[1] the character exists within Marvel's main shared universe, known as the Marvel Universe. He was created by Christopher Priest and Mark Texeira, and first appeared in Black Panther Vol. 3, #3.

Publication history[edit]

Achebe was mentioned in Black Panther Vol. 3, #2 and went on to appear Issues #3-5, #8-13, #22-23, and #36-37. He also made guest appearances in Deadpool Vol. 2, #43-44, and received entries in both All-New Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe #1, and Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe A-Z #1

Creator Christopher Priest has noted that the character was inspired by thoughts of Hannibal Lecter and Hans Gruber, and that he is "the Joker to Panther's Batman".[2]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Achebe's past is vague, but it is believed by the United States government that he was a Ghudazan farmer nicknamed "Bob" who tended to leftist rebels from the neighboring country of Ujanka when the men were driven across the Ghudazan/Ujankan border and onto Achebe's property. The soldiers repaid Achebe's kindness by leaving him for dead after they seduced his wife, razed his farm, and stabbed him thirty-two times. According to urban legends, Achebe survived by selling his soul to Mephisto, and went on to kill everyone he knew of who had ever interacted with his wife, destroying the homes of his victims, and stabbing each one thirty-two times.[3]

After attending Yale Law School, where he earned degrees in various subjects, Achebe returned to Ghudazan, where he helped instigate an ethnic war.[3] When Black Panther established a refugee camp on the outskirts of Wakanda for those seeking asylum from the conflict, Achebe infiltrated it, and exacerbated unease between the refugees and the Wakandans. Achebe then lured Black Panther out of Wakanda by corrupting one of his charities situated in America, and by having the organization's "poster child" killed.[4][5]

While Black Panther is preoccupied in the United States, Achebe leads an uprising in the African refugee camp, and appoints himself head of the provisional government that overtakes Wakanda.[6] Achebe subjects Wakanda to his deranged decrees, which worsen after his connection to Mephisto is severed by the machinations of Black Panther. Achebe's forces weaken without Mephisto's backing, though he retains his position as prime minister by promising to share power with Black Panther's stepmother, Ramonda, so long as Black Panther remains in America.[7] Achebe later tries to assassinate Black Panther by having his allies in the United States place a bomb on a bystander, and a remotely controllable exoskeleton on Black Panther's ex-fiancé, Monica. Black Panther is able to defuse the explosive and free Monica from the exoskeleton with the help of the Avengers.[8]

As Achebe prepares to be crowned king of Wakanda, and begins conversing with a hand puppet named Daki, Black Panther works on unraveling the conspiracy that helped Achebe instigate the Ghudazan conflict that allowed him, and his backers, to attain power in Wakanda.[9] While Ramonda is distracted, Achebe knocks her out, and acquires her codes for the Prowlers, the robotic defenders of Wakanda.[10] Achebe unleashes the reprogrammed Prowlers, covers himself in explosives, and confronts Black Panther and his friend Everett K. Ross when they reach Wakanda.[11] Achebe forces Black Panther and Ross into a deathtrap based on a claw machine, which they later escape from, while he flees Wakanda.[12]

Achebe resurfaces in America, where he hires Deadpool to steal Preyy, the pet spotted leopard of Erik Killmonger, the current Black Panther.[13][14] By doing this, Achebe hoped to goad T'Challa into coming out of his self-imposed exile to reclaim the title of Black Panther.[15]

Powers and abilities[edit]

Blessed by Mephisto, Achebe is a brilliant schemer, strategist, and planner, though these attributes are weakened by his mental instability, and obsessive hatred of Black Panther.[9] He is also a skilled acrobat with exceptional agility.

Other versions[edit]

The Once and Future King[edit]

Achebe is among the villains recruited by T'Charra to help him kill and usurp his father, an elderly Black Panther.[16] Achebe and the other criminals are defeated by Black Panther's allies Brother Voodoo, Falcon, and Luke Cage.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Here's Why Marvel's Black Panther Will Bring Veneration To The Superhero Niche". moviepilot.com. Moviepilot. 25 January 2015. Retrieved 8 July 2015. 
  2. ^ Priest, Christopher (June 2001). "Chapter Eleven: Black Panther Series Commentary". digitalpriest.com. Digital Priest. Retrieved 8 July 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Christopher Priest (w), Mark Texeira (p), Mark Texeira (i), Brian Haberlin (col), Rich S and Comicraft's Siobhan Hanna (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Original Sin" Black Panther v3, #3 (January 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  4. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Mark Texeira (p), Mark Texeira (i), Brian Haberlin (col), RS and Comicraft's Siobhan Hanna (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "The Client" Black Panther v3, #1 (November 1998), United States: Marvel Comics
  5. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Mark Texeira (p), Mark Texeira (i), Avalon Color (col), Rich S and Comicraft's Siobhan Hanna (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Invasion" Black Panther v3, #2 (December 1998), United States: Marvel Comics
  6. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Mark Texeira (p), Mark Texeira (i), Brian Haberlin (col), Richard S and Comicraft Letters (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "The Price" Black Panther v3, #4 (February 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  7. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Vince Evans (p), Vince Evans (i), Brian Haberlin (col), Richard Starkings and Comicraft's Wes Abbott (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Lord of the Damned" Black Panther v3, #5 (March 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  8. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Joe Jusko and Amanda Connor (p), Vince Evans and Jimmy Palmiotti (i), Brian Haberlin (col), Starkings and Comicraft (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "That Business with the Avengers!" Black Panther v3, #8 (June 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  9. ^ a b Christopher Priest (w), Mike Manley (p), Mike Manley (i), Chris Sotomayer (col), Richard Starkings and Comicraft (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Enemy of the State" Black Panther v3, #9 (July 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  10. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Mike Manley (p), Mike Manley (i), Chris Sotomayer (col), Richard Starkings and Comicraft/JL (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Enemy of the State, Book Two" Black Panther v3, #10 (August 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  11. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Mark Bright (p), Nelson Decastro (i), Chris Sotomayer (col), Richard Starkings and Comicraft/JL (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Enemy of the State, Book Three" Black Panther v3, #11 (September 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  12. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Mark Bright (p), Nelson Decastro (i), Chris Sotomayer (col), RS and Comicraft's Liz Agraphiotis (let), Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Enemy of the State, Conclusion: The Taking of Wakanda 1-2-3" Black Panther v3, #12 (October 1999), United States: Marvel Comics
  13. ^ Christopher Priest (w), J. Califiore (p), Jon Holdredge (i), Shannon Blanchard (col), Chris Eliopoulos (let), Mike Marts (ed). "The Menaced Phantom (Or: Deadpool's Last, We Swear, Cosmic Adventure!)" Deadpool v2, #43 (August 2000), United States: Marvel Comics
  14. ^ Christopher Priest (w), J. Califiore (p), Jon Holdredge (i), Shannon Blanchard (col), Chris Eliopoulos (let), Mike Marts (ed). "Cat Trap (Or: Wakanda Merc Are You?)" Deadpool v2, #44 (September 2000), United States: Marvel Comics
  15. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Sal Velluto (p), Bob Almond (i), Steve Oliff (col), Sharpefont and PT (let), Tom Brevoort (ed). "More of that Business with the Avengers" Black Panther v3, #23 (October 2000), United States: Marvel Comics
  16. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Sal Velluto (p), Bob Almond (i), VLM (col), Sharpefont and PT (let), Mike Marts (ed). "The Once and Future King, Part 1" Black Panther v3, #36 (December 2001), United States: Marvel Comics
  17. ^ Christopher Priest (w), Sal Velluto (p), Bob Almond (i), VLM's Jennifer Schellinger (col), Sharpefont's Paul Tutrone (let), Mike Marts (ed). "The Once and Future King, Part 2" Black Panther v3, #37 (January 2002), United States: Marvel Comics

External links[edit]