Acro Sport II

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Acro Sport II
EAA Acro Sport II - AirExpo Muret 2007 0132 2007-05-12.jpg
Role aerobatic sportsplane
National origin US
Manufacturer Acro Sport
Designer Paul Poberezny
Developed from Acro Sport I
Acro Sport II
Acro Sport II
Acro Sport II

The Acro II is a two-seat aerobatic sportsplane designed by US aviation enthusiast Paul Poberezny in the 1970s for amateur construction. It is an enlarged version of his previous Acro Sport I, sized up to carry two persons. Plans are available through Acro Sport in Wisconsin and material kits are supplied by Aircraft Spruce and Specialty.[1][2][3]

Design and development[edit]

The Acro Sport II is a short-span biplane of conventional taildragger configuration, typically built with open cockpits and spatted main undercarriage. Its structure is fabric-covered, steel tube fuselage and tail group, with wood wing structure.[1][2]

Operational history[edit]

In March 2017, 83 examples were on the Federal Aviation Administration aircraft registry in the United States, although 129 had at one time been registered. In Canada in March 2017 there were 11 registered with Transport Canada.[4][5]

Variants[edit]

Acro Sport I
Single place version of the Acro Sport

Specifications[edit]

Data from Terpstra[6]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Capacity: one passenger
  • Length: 18 ft 10.25 in (5.7468 m)
  • Wingspan: 21 ft 8 in (6.60 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 7.75 in (2.0257 m)
  • Wing area: 152 sq ft (14.1 m2)
  • Empty weight: 875 lb (397 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,520 lb (689 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-360 4-cylinder, air-cooled, horizontally-opposed piston aircraft engine, 180 hp (130 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 152 mph (245 km/h; 132 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 123 mph (198 km/h; 107 kn)
  • Stall speed: 53 mph (85 km/h; 46 kn)
  • Range: 430 mi (374 nmi; 692 km)
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,200 ft/min (6.1 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 10.0 lb/sq ft (49 kg/m2)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bayerl, Robby; Martin Berkemeier; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2011-12, page 89. WDLA UK, Lancaster UK, 2011. ISSN 1368-485X
  2. ^ a b Tacke, Willi; Marino Boric; et al: World Directory of Light Aviation 2015-16, page 91. Flying Pages Europe SARL, 2015. ISSN 1368-485X
  3. ^ Aircraft Spruce and Specialty (2017). "Acro Sport II". aircraftspruce.com. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  4. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (28 March 2017). "Make / Model Inquiry Results". Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  5. ^ Transport Canada (28 March 2017). "Canadian Civil Aircraft Register". Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  6. ^ Terpstra, 1992, p.14.
  • Terpstra, Philip (1992). 1992 Worldwide Homebuilt Aircraft Directory. Tucson, Arizona: Spirit Publications. p. 13. 

External links[edit]