Action Movie Kid

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Action Movie Kid is an action web series created by Daniel Hashimoto.[1][2] It contains his son, James, as the main character.[3] Each clip is a short home movie of James playing, when something dramatic happens: explosions, death-defying feats, and other crazy stunts. All of the dangerous effects and stunts are added in post-production by Daniel Hashimoto, who is a freelance visual effects arts and a visual development artist at DreamWorks Animation. He uses Adobe After Effects to make the short videos for YouTube.[4]

The web series has 897,072 subscribers on YouTube and 355,475,930 views as of this update on Jan. 16, 2018.[5]

Book Adaptation[edit]

There will be a book adaption based on the web series in May 5, 2015. According to James in the book's trailer, he will fight a gooey monster and claims to be a bedtime story

Commercial Success Inspired by[edit]

In June 2014 The Escape Pod Ad Agency contacted Daniel Hashimoto to co-write and direct commercials for their client Toys"R"Us.[6][7] In addition to writing and directing Hashimoto also did much of the VFX work along with Eric Miller Animation Studios.[8]

Awards[edit]

2014 Streamy Award - Visual and Special Effects | Winner [9]

2014 Streamy Award - Action and Sci-Fi | Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Action Movie Kid". www.twitter.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  2. ^ "Action Movie Kid Plays Mario Grocery Kart". technabob.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  3. ^ "DreamWorks dad Daniel Hashimoto turns toddler son into lightsaber-wielding CGI superhero". independent.co.uk. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  4. ^ "DreamWorks dad Daniel Hashimoto turns toddler son into lightsaber-wielding CGI superhero". www.nydailynews.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  5. ^ "Action Movie Kid". www.youtube.com. Retrieved 2016-03-28.
  6. ^ "Toys'R'Us 2014: Behind the Scenes with Action Movie Kid & The Escape Pod". www.youtube.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  7. ^ "The 'Action Movie Kid' Dives Into A Toys R Us Ad Campaign". www.tubefilter.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  8. ^ "A Blank Canvas, and Endless Possibilities for an Animation Studio". www.blog.milleranimation.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  9. ^ "Streamy Awards Big Winners Include 'Video Game High School,' LGBT Vlogger Tyler Oakley". www.thewrap.com. Retrieved 2015-03-01.

External links[edit]