Acton-Boxborough Regional High School

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Acton-Boxborough Regional High School
ABRHS.jpg
Address
36 Charter Road

,
01720

Coordinates42°28′47″N 71°27′26″W / 42.47972°N 71.45722°W / 42.47972; -71.45722Coordinates: 42°28′47″N 71°27′26″W / 42.47972°N 71.45722°W / 42.47972; -71.45722
Information
TypePublic
Open enrollment[1]
School districtActon-Boxborough Regional School District
PrincipalLarry Dorey
Faculty133[2]
Enrollment1,864 (2016-17)[3]
Color(s)Blue & Gold         
Athletics21 interscholastic sports[4]
MascotThe Colonial
Website

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School (ABRHS) is an open enrollment high school in Acton, Massachusetts. A part of the Acton-Boxborough Regional School District, it serves the Massachusetts towns of Acton and Boxborough and has students in grades 9 through 12. It is situated downhill from the Raymond J. Grey Junior High School, at 36 Charter Road in Acton. Raymond J. Grey Junior High School occupies the facility that, until 1973, was the high school. ABRHS underwent an $80 million renovation and expansion in 2005.[6]

ABRHS was one of 39 American high schools named a Blue Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education in 2009.[7] In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked Acton-Boxborough #3 among open enrollment high schools and #7 overall for STEM education.[8] Nonprofit group GreatSchools ranked Acton #2 among small cities nationwide for its public education.[9] ABRHS has achieved this success while serving many immigrant and limited-English-proficient students and maintaining per-pupil spending below the state average.[10]

The National Wildlife Federation awarded ABRHS a Green Flag Award for its work to increase environmental awareness and promote environmental stewardship. ABRHS is also set to receive environmental awards from the Massachusetts state government and the National Energy Education Development Project.[11]

Academics[edit]

ABRHS offers classes in a wide range of academic and artistic subjects, including Chinese, Latin, photography, graphic design, and anatomy & physiology. For most classes in academic subjects, students have the option of taking CP (college prep), AE (accelerated enriched), or Honors/Advanced Placement (AP) classes. The school regularly has graduation rates over 95% and college attendance rates over 90%.[10]

In 2017, the percent of 10th graders that earned a "proficient or higher" rating on MCAS, were as follows: English/Language Arts/Reading 97%, Math 95% and Science/Technology/Engineering 96%.[12] There were 973 AP exams and 94% of the exams received a score of 3 or higher.[13] The district had the following mean results, on SAT's in 2017: Reading 642, Math 665, Total score 1307.[14]

Athletics[edit]

ABRHS has 21 different interscholastic sports, many of which are divided into Varsity, Junior Varsity and Freshman teams. All sports have boys' and girls' teams or are co-ed except for football, field hockey, cheerleading, wrestling, gymnastics, softball, and baseball. The school is a member of the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association, within which it competes in the Dual County League (DCL).

The fall sports are football (boys), football cheerleading (girls), field hockey (girls), soccer, volleyball (girls), golf, swimming (girls; boys' is in the winter), and cross-country running. ABRHS's winter sports are basketball, ice hockey, indoor track, wrestling (boys), gymnastics (girls), alpine ski, basketball cheerleading, swimming (boys; girls' is in the fall), and cross-country skiing. Spring sports include lacrosse, softball (girls), baseball (boys), tennis, volleyball (boys), and track and field.[4]

Achievements[edit]

The girls' field hockey team won the state championship in 2007, 2009, 2012, 2014, and 2015 and girls' soccer won the state championship in 2007. The girls' swimming/diving team has won 13 state championships. For winter sports, the boys' swimming/diving team has won nine state championships and boys' indoor track was the Class A state champion in 2012. Among the spring sports, the girls' tennis team won the state championship in 2008 and 2012 while the boys' lacrosse team won the state championship in 2014.[15]

Environmentalism[edit]

Acton-Boxborough received the Green Flag Award from the National Wildlife Federation.[11]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.doe.mass.edu/finance/schoolchoice/choice-status.pdf
  2. ^ "ABRHS Class of 2012 Profile". Acton-Boxborough Regional High School. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  3. ^ "Acton-Boxborough Regional High". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "AB Community Handbook of Athletics". Acton-Boxborough Regional Schools. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  5. ^ http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/statereport/sat.aspx
  6. ^ "ABRHS Renovation". The New Yorker. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  7. ^ Vittorioso, Stephen. "Acton-Boxborough Regional High named Blue Ribbon school". Archived from the original on 8 November 2012. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  8. ^ "Acton-Boxborough Regional High School: Overview". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  9. ^ "Top public schools: Small U.S. cities". GreatSchools. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  10. ^ a b "The Lamplighter, March/April 2012" (PDF). Acton Public Schools & Acton-Boxborough Regional Schools. Retrieved 24 February 2013.[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ a b Smith, Margaret. "ABRHS wins Green Flag award". Wicked Local. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  12. ^ "MCAS Tests 2017 Percent of Students at Each Achievement Level for Acton-Boxborough". School and District Profiles. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. n.d. Retrieved 2018-07-25.
  13. ^ "2016-17 Advanced Placement Performance Report All Students". School and District Profiles. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. n.d. Retrieved 2018-07-25.
  14. ^ Halpern, Joe. "Here are the Mass. high schools with the highest SAT scores". Boston Business Journal. Boston. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  15. ^ "District Profile 2012-2013" (PDF). Acton Public Schools/Acton-Boxborough Regional Schools. Retrieved 24 February 2013.[permanent dead link]
  16. ^ Maria Konnikova (7 January 2014). "The Open-Office Trap". The New Yorker. Retrieved 18 September 2014.

External links[edit]