Acylhydrazine

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An example of an acylhydrazine. This compound has been called acetylhydrazide, acetohydrazide, or acetic acid hydrazide.[1]

Acylhydrazines are a class of organic compounds and can be regarded as nitrogen derivatives of carboxylic acids having the general structure R-CO-NR1-NR2R3, where R1, R2 and R3 can be organic radicals or hydrogen. They are analogous to an amide, but the -OH portion of a carboxylic acid is replaced by hydrazine rather than ammonia (one less hydrogen at the point of attachment). Acylhydrazines are a type of hydrazides.

Preparation[edit]

Carboxylic hydrazides can be prepared by reacting acyl halides with hydrazine (or correspondingly substituted hydrazines) or by reduction of N-nitroso carboxamides.[2]

Properties[edit]

Carboxylic hydrazides are stable, polar solids and partially pharmacologically active.[2]

Use[edit]

Acylhydrazines are intermediates in chemical syntheses, for example in the synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles and acyl azides.[3]

An applied example is a synthesis of sunitinib begins by mixing 5-fluoroisatin slowly into hydrazine hydrate.[4] After 4 hours at 110 °C, the indole ring structure has been broken into (2-amino-5-fluoro-phenyl)-acetic acid hydrazide with reduction of the ketone at the 3-position. Subsequent annelation in strong acid creates the 1,3-dihydro-2-oxo indole structure required for the drug.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ChemicalBook:2-(4-ethylphenoxy)acetylhydrazide". 
  2. ^ a b Siegfried Hauptmann: Organische Chemie, 2. Auflage, VEB Deutscher Verlag für Grundstoffindustrie, Leipzig, 1985, S. 425, ISBN 3-342-00280-8.
  3. ^ Siegfried Hauptmann: Organische Chemie, 2. Auflage, VEB Deutscher Verlag für Grundstoffindustrie, Leipzig, 1985, S. 426, ISBN 3-342-00280-8.
  4. ^ "US patent 6573293". 

References[edit]