Adam Berry

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Adam Barrett Berry (born December 3, 1966) is a two-time Emmy-winning television and film composer and a Grammy Award-winning producer and member of the new age band White Sun. He is originally from Los Angeles. Some of his credits include South Park, Kim Possible, and The Sarah Silverman Program. He worked closely with Trey Parker and Matt Stone's in developing the scores for the first four seasons of South Park, and also played in their punk band, DVDA.[1] As a member of new age band White Sun, Berry garnered a Grammy Award for best New Age album in 2017 for the album White Sun II.

Further reading[edit]

  • Nye, Sean. "From Punk to the Musical: South Park, Music, and the Cartoon Format." Music In Television: Channels of Listening, ed. James Deaville. London: Routledge, 2011. pp. 143–64.
  • Nye, Sean. "Generation X, South Park, and TV Music Composition: An Interview with Adam Berry.” Music In Television: Channels of Listening, ed. James Deaville. London: Routledge, 2011. pp. 217–26.

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Film
1996 Fugitive Rage
Friend of the Family II
1999 Star Portal
American Intellectuals
2000 Buzz Lightyear of Star Command: The Adventure Begins
2002 Balto II: Wolf Quest
2003 Tara
Beethoven's 5th
2004 Balto III: Wings of Change
2005 Paine Management
The Trouble with Dee Dee
2008 Happy Campers
2010 Boobs: An American Obsession

Television[edit]

Year Series Notes
1997–2000 South Park
1998–1999 Hercules
2000–2001 Buzz Lightyear of Star Command
2001–2003 Small Shots
2002–2007 Kim Possible Emmy nominated:
  • Outstanding Music Direction and Composition, 2005
2005–2006 The Buzz on Maggie
2006–2007 American Dragon: Jake Long
2007–2010 The Sarah Silverman Program
2008–2015 The Penguins of Madagascar Emmy wins:
  • Outstanding Music Direction and Composition, 2011
  • Outstanding Original Song—Children's and Animation, 2012[2]
2013–2014 Monsters vs. Aliens
2016-2018 Lost in Oz
2017–present Big Hero 6: The Series

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nye, Sean. Generation X, South Park, and TV Music Composition: An Interview with Adam Berry.” Music In Television: Channels of Listening, ed. James Deaville. London: Routledge, 2011. Pp. 217-26.
  2. ^ "Awards for Adam Berry". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved November 26, 2012.

External links[edit]