Adam Małysz

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Adam Małysz
Adam Malysz (2).jpg
Małysz in Oslo, 2006
Country  Poland
Full name Adam Henryk Małysz
Born (1977-12-03) 3 December 1977 (age 37)
Wisła, Poland
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Personal best 230.5 m (756 ft)
Vikersund, 13 Feb 2011
World Cup career
Seasons 19952011
Individual wins 39
Indv. podiums 92
Team podiums 4
Overall titles 4 (2001, 2002, 2003, 2007)
Four Hills titles 1 (2001)
Nordic titles 3 (2001, 2003, 2007)
Updated on 30 Mar 2015.
Adam Małysz
Dakar Rally career
Debut season 2012
Championships Dakar Rally
Best finish 13 in 2014
Last updated on: 21 January 2014.

Adam Henryk Małysz [ˈadam ˈmawɨʂ] (born 3 December 1977) is a Polish former ski jumper and current rally driver. One of the most successful ski jumpers of all time, Małysz's many significant accomplishments in the sport include four individual Winter Olympic medals (at Salt Lake City and Vancouver); four individual World Championship gold medals (an all-time record); four individual World Cup titles (all-time record shared with Matti Nykänen); 39 individual competition wins; a total of 96 podiums (individual and team); and being the only ski jumper to have won three consecutive World Cup titles, doing so from 2001 to 2003. He is also a winner of the Four Hills Tournament (2000–01) and the only three-time winner of the Nordic Tournament (2001, 2003, 2007).

After concluding his 16-year ski jumping career in 2011, Małysz competed in the Dakar Rally in 2012, 2013 and 2014 finishing 37th,[1] 15th[2] and 13th[3] respectively.

Career[edit]

Małysz began his senior level ski jumping career on 4 January 1995, finishing seventeenth at the third event of the Four Hills Tournament in Innsbruck. In his first two World Cup seasons he was moderately successful, winning in Oslo on 17 March 1996; in Sapporo on 18 January 1997; and in Hakuba on 26 January. His breakthrough season came in 2000–01, when he won the Four Hills Tournament and ended Martin Schmitt's long run of success dating back to 1998–99. Małysz went on to dominate the season by reeling off five consecutive individual victories in Innsbruck, Bischofshofen, both ski flying competitions in Harrachov, and Park City. Further success came at the 2001 World Championships, in which he won a gold medal on the individual normal hill and silver on the individual large hill. He finished the season by a landslide points margin with three more consecutive wins in Falun, Trondheim and Oslo to claim his first Nordic Tournament title.

The 2001–02 season saw Małysz pick up where he left off, as he never once lost the lead in the World Cup standings. A streak of five wins by a highly motivated Sven Hannawald in December 2001 through January 2002 looked to threaten Małysz's run, but burnout prematurely ended Hannawald's challenge.[4] Małysz picked up one last win of the season in Zakopane to the delight of his Polish fans, thereafter finishing consistently on the podium to claim his second World Cup title by a comfortable points margin. He also won silver on the individual large hill and bronze on the individual normal hill at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Park City.

Małysz faced stiff competition in defence of his World Cup title throughout the 2002–03 season. Despite second place at the season-opener in Kuusamo, he failed to win a competition for nearly four months. The lead of the overall standings changed hands several times until the final month of the season, by which time Małysz began to regain his form. At the 2003 World Championships in Predazzo, he won the gold medal in both the individual normal and large hill competitions. This was followed up by three straight wins in Oslo and Lahti (twice in the latter), securing his second Nordic Tournament title. Małysz ended the season on a high by equalling the then-world record of 225 metres (738 ft) in Planica, as well as fending off a late challenge by Sven Hannawald, who again finished runner-up in the overall World Cup standings—albeit with six wins to Małysz's three, and by a closer margin than before.

In the following years, as is the case with almost all ski jumpers in the prime of their career, Małysz was unable to maintain his previous form. He only managed twelfth in the 2003–04 season, finishing on the podium four times but without a win. 2004–05 saw an improvement with fourth place in the overall standings as well as four wins; these came on the large hill in Harrachov, the ski flying hill in Kulm, and a double win in Zakopane. The only highlights of Małysz's 2005–06 campaign, in which he finished ninth overall, were third place in Kuopio and a win in Oslo.

Małysz experienced a significant career resurgence in 2006–07, which began with a surprise win at the opening competition of the Four Hills Tournament in Oberstdorf. This was followed up by a double victory in Titisee-Neustadt, a gold medal on the individual normal hill at the 2007 World Championships, and three wins in a row during the Nordic Tournament (Lahti, Kuopio and Oslo) to win his third and final such title. The season was punctuated with a clean sweep of all three competitions in Planica, which enabled him to leapfrog his younger competitor Anders Jacobsen with only two competitions remaining. This secured Małysz a fourth World Cup title, equalling Matti Nykänen's record total in the 1980s.

Sporadic success from 2008 to 2011 saw Małysz achieve seventeen podiums, as well as silver medals in both the individual normal hill and large hill competitions at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. A fitting end to Małysz's career came in the form of a home victory in Zakopane on 21 January 2011 and third place at the season finale in Planica on 20 March. Małysz publicly announced his retirement from ski jumping six days later.

Legacy and awards[edit]

Małysz's success contributed to his enormous popularity not only among ski jumping fans but throughout Poland as well. Additionally, he is the only five-time winner of the ski jumping event at the Holmenkollen Ski Festival (in 1996, 2001, 2003, 2006 and 2007), earning the Holmenkollen Medal in 2001 for his ski jumping victories (shared with Bente Skari and Thomas Alsgaard).

For his sporting achievements, he received the Order of Polonia Restituta:

Officer's Cross Officer's Cross (4th Class), 2002
Commander's Cross Commander's Cross (3rd Class), 2007
Commander's Cross with Star Commander's Cross with Star (2nd Class), 2010

World Cup[edit]

Season titles[edit]

Season Title
2000–01 Overall
Four Hills Tournament
Nordic Tournament
2001–02 Overall
2002–03 Overall
Nordic Tournament
2006–07 Overall
Nordic Tournament

Victories[edit]

Day Year Location Hill Point K HS Jump 1 Jump 2 Note (points)
1. 17 March 1996 Oslo Holmenkollbakken K-110 106,5 m 121,5 m 249.4
2. 18 January 1997 Sapporo Miyanomori K-90 89,5 m 93,0 m 239.0
3. 26 January 1997 Hakuba Stadium Hakuba K-120 121,0 m 125,5 m 246.7
4. 4 January 2001 Innsbruck Bergisel K-108 111,5 m 118,5 m 259.2
5. 5 January 2001 Bischofshofen Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze K-120 127,0 m 134,0 m 274.8
6. 13 January 2001 Harrachov Čerťák K-185 206,5 m 194,5 m 392,7
7. 14 January 2001 Harrachov Čerťák K-185 212,0 m 194,5 m 397.8
8. 20 January 2001 Park City Utah Olympic Park K-120 129,5 m 133,5 m 276.4
9. 27 January 2001 Sapporo Okurayama K-120 132,5 m 133,5 m 282.3
10. 28 January 2001 Sapporo Okurayama K-120 132,5 m 136,0 m 283.8
11. 4 February 2001 Willingen Mühlenkopfschanze K-120 142,5 m 142,5 m 316.0
12. 7 March 2001 Falun Lugnet K-115 119,5 m 124,0 m 259.8
13. 9 March 2001 Trondheim Granåsen K-120 116,0 m 138,5 m 254.6
14. 11 March 2001 Oslo Holmenkollbakken K-115 124,5 m 134.1
15. 23 November 2001 Kuopio Puijo K-120 123,5 m 126,5 m 254.0
16. 1 December 2001 Titisee-Neustadt Hochfirstschanze K-120 138,5 m 136,0 m 297.6
17. 8 December 2001 Villach Alpenarena K-90 99,5 m 98,0 m 271.5
18. 16 December 2001 Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze K-120 132,0 m 134,5 m 281.7
19. 21 December 2001 Predazzo Trampolino Dal Ben K-120 131,0 m 130,0 m 272.8
20. 22 December 2001 Predazzo Trampolino Dal Ben K-120 132,0 m 132,5 m 282.1
21. 20 January 2002 Zakopane Wielka Krokiew K-120 131.0 m 123,5 m 262.1
22. 9 March 2003 Oslo Holmenkollbakken K-115 124,5 m 133.6
23. 14 March 2003 Lahti Salpausselkä K-116 122,0 m 128,0 m 267.4
24. 15 March 2003 Lahti Salpausselkä K-116 129,5 m 132,0 m 289.6
25. 11 December 2004 Harrachov Čerťák K-125 HS-142 143,0 m 136,0 m 284.2
26. 16 January 2005 Tauplitz Kulm[disambiguation needed] K-185 HS-200 207,0 m 209,5 m 412.3
27. 29 January 2005 Zakopane Wielka Krokiew K-120 HS-134 129,5 m 131,0 m 268.9
28. 30 January 2005 Zakopane Wielka Krokiew K-120 HS-134 132,0 m 132,0 m 278.2
29. 29 March 2006 Oslo Holmenkollbakken K-115 HS-128 130,5 m 124,5 m 279.0
30. 27 January 2007 Oberstdorf Schattenbergschanze K-120 HS-137 132,5 m 137,0 m 283.1
31. 3 February 2007 Titisee-Neustadt Hochfirstschanze K-125 HS-142 138,5 m 145,0 m 293.8
32. 4 February 2007 Titisee-Neustadt Hochfirstschanze K-125 HS-142 129,5 m 134,5 m 257.7
33. 11 March 2007 Lahti Salpausselkä K-116 HS-130 125,0 m 128,0 m 265.8
34. 13 March 2007 Kuopio Puijo K-120 HS-127 125,0 m 115,0 m 229.0
35. 17 March 2007 Oslo Holmenkollbakken K-115 HS-128 131,0 m 122,0 m 272.9
36. 23 March 2007 Planica Letalnica K-185 HS-215 208,5 m 221,5 m 423.5
37. 24 March 2007 Planica Letalnica K-185 HS-215 210,5 m 217,5 m 419.6
38. 25 March 2007 Planica Letalnica K-185 HS-215 220,0 m 215.0
39. 21 January 2011 Zakopane Wielka Krokiew K-120 HS-134 138,5 m 128,5 m 269.9

Total podiums[edit]

  1. Iron Mountain – 18 February 1996 (2nd place)
  2. Lahti – 1 March 1996 (3rd place shared with Primož Peterka)
  3. Falun – 13 March 1996 (2nd place)
  4. Oslo/Holmenkollen – 17 March 1996 (1st place)
  5. Bischofshofen – 6 January 1997 (2nd place)
  6. Engelberg – 11 January 1997 (3rd place)
  7. Sapporo – 18 January 1997 (1st place)
  8. Hakuba – 26 January 1997 (1st place)
  9. Garmisch-Partenkirchen – 1 January 2001 (3rd place)
  10. Innsbruck – 4 January 2001 (1st place)
  11. Bischofshofen – 6 January 2001 (1st place)
  12. Harrachov (HS 205) – 13 January 2001 (1st place)
  13. Harrachov (HS 205) – 14 January 2001 (1st place)
  14. Salt Lake City – 20 January 2001 (1st place)
  15. Sapporo – 27 January 2001(1st place)
  16. Sapporo – 28 January 2001 (1st place)
  17. Willingen – 3 February 2001 (2nd place)
  18. Willingen – 4 February 2001 (1st place)
  19. Oberstdorf (HS 213) – 4 March 2001 (2nd place)
  20. Falun – 7 March 2001 (1st place)
  21. Trondheim/Granasen – 9 March 2001 (1st place)
  22. Oslo/Holmenkollen – 11 March 2001 (1st place)
  23. Kuopio – 23 November 2001 (1st place)
  24. Kuopio – 24 November 2001 (2nd place)
  25. Titisee-Neustadt – 1 December 2001 (1st place)
  26. Titisee-Neustadt – 2 December 2001 (2nd place)
  27. Villach – 8 December 2001 (1st place)
  28. Engelberg – 16 December 2001 (1st place)
  29. Val di Fiemme/Predazzo – 21 December 2001 (1st place)
  30. Val di Fiemme/Predazzo – 22 December 2001 (1st place)
  31. Garmisch-Partenkirchen – 1 January 2002 (3rd place)
  32. Innsbruck – 4 January 2002 (2nd place)
  33. Zakopane – 20 January 2002 (1st place)
  34. Lahti – 1 March 2002 (2nd place)
  35. Trondheim – 15 March 2002 (2nd place)
  36. Oslo/Holmenkollen – 17 March 2002 (3rd place)
  37. Kuusamo – 29 November 2002 (2nd place)
  38. Titisee-Neustadt – 14 December 2002 (3rd place)
  39. Garmisch-Partenkirchen – 1 January 2003 (2nd place shared with Andreas Goldberger)
  40. Zakopane – 18 January 2003 (3rd place)
  41. Zakopane – 19 January 2003 (3rd place)
  42. Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf – 1 February 2003 (3rd place)
  43. Oslo/Holmenkollen – 9 March 2003 (1st place)
  44. Lahti – 14 March 2003 (1st place)
  45. Lahti – 15 March 2003 (1st place)
  46. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 22 March 2003 (2nd place)
  47. Kuusamo – 28 November 2003 (2nd place)
  48. Kuusamo – 30 November 2003 (2nd place)
  49. Zakopane – 17 January 2004(2nd place)
  50. Zakopane – 18 January 2004 (2nd place)
  51. Harrachov (HS 142) – 11 December 2004 (1st place)
  52. Oberstdorf (HS 137) – 29 December 2004 (3rd place)
  53. Innsbruck – 3 January 2005 (2nd place)
  54. Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf – 15 January 2005 (3rd place)
  55. Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf – 16 January 2005 (1st place)
  56. Titisee-Neustadt – 23 January 2005 (2nd place)
  57. Zakopane – 29 January 2005 (1st place shared with Roar Ljøkelsøy)
  58. Zakopane – 30 January 2005 (1st place)
  59. Kuopio – 9 March 2005 (3rd place shared with Jakub Janda)
  60. Kuopio – 7 March 2006 (3rd place)
  61. Oslo/Holmenkollen – 12 March 2006 (1st place)
  62. Lillehammer – 3 December 2006 (3rd place)
  63. Engelberg – 16 December 2006 (3rd place)
  64. Oberstdorf (HS 137) – 30 December 2006 (3rd place)
  65. Oberstdorf (HS 137) – 27 January 2007 (1st place)
  66. Titisee-Neustadt (HS 142) – 3 February 2007 (1st place)
  67. Titisee-Neustadt (HS 142) – 4 February 2007 (1st place)
  68. Klingenthal – 7 February 2007 (3rd place)
  69. Lahti (HS 130) – 11 March 2007 (1st place)
  70. Kuopio (HS 127) – 13 March 2007 (1st place)
  71. Oslo/Holmenkollen (HS 128) – 17 March 2007 (1st place)
  72. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 23 March 2007 (1st place)
  73. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 24 March 2007 (1st place)
  74. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 25 March 2007 (1st place)
  75. Kuopio/Puijo – 10 March 2009 (3rd place)
  76. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 20 March 2009 (2nd place)
  77. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 22 March 2009 (2nd place)
  78. Lillehammer – 5 December 2009 (3rd place)
  79. Klingenthal – 3 February 2010 (2nd place)
  80. Lahti (HS 130) – 7 March 2010 (2nd place)
  81. Kuopio (HS 127) – 9 March 2010 (2nd place)
  82. Lillehammer – 12 March 2010 (3rd place)
  83. Oslo/Holmenkollen – 14 March 2010 (2nd place)
  84. Engelberg – 18 December 2010 (2nd place)
  85. Engelberg – 19 December 2010 (3rd place)
  86. Garmisch-Partenkirchen – 1 January 2011 (3rd place)
  87. Innsbruck – 3 January 2011 (2nd place)
  88. Harrachov (HS 205) – 8 January 2011 (3rd place)
  89. Sapporo – 15 January 2011 (3rd place)
  90. Zakopane – 21 January 2011 (1st place)
  91. Vikersund – 13 February 2011 (3rd place)
  92. Planica (letalnica, HS215) – 20 March 2011 (3rd place)

Personal life[edit]

Adam Małysz was born in Wisła, Poland, to Ewa and Jan Małysz. He has an older sister – Iwona (born 1975). He graduated Vocational School in Ustroń, where he earned a profession (specialisation: tinsmith-roofer). He speaks German very well. On the 16 of June 1997 he married Izabella Polok (born 4 December 1978). The wedding took place at the Evangelical Church of St. Peter and Paul in the Wisła (Izabella is Catholic). On 31 October 1997 of the same year gave birth to their daughter – Karolina. His life motto is "Be good and just" and his idol is German former ski jumper Jens Weißflog. His religion is Lutheranism.[5]

On 1 April 2007 opened a gallery of trophies. It includes all the major medals and trophies, including Crystal Globe trophies for victories in the World Cup. The gallery is located in the building of the Foundation Izabella and Adam Małysz in Wisła, Poland.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Records
Preceded by
Andreas Goldberger
World's longest ski jump
20 Mar 2003 – 20 Mar 2003
Succeeded by
Matti Hautamäki
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Robert Korzeniowski
Polish Sportspersonality of the year
2001–2003
Succeeded by
Otylia Jędrzejczak
Preceded by
Otylia Jędrzejczak
Polish Sportspersonality of the year
2007
Succeeded by
Robert Kubica