Adam Rippon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adam Rippon
Rippon at the 2018 Human Rights Campaign National Dinner
Born (1989-11-11) November 11, 1989 (age 34)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
HometownClarks Summit, Pennsylvania
Height1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)[1]
Figure skating career
Country United States
CoachRafael Arutyunyan
Vera Arutyunyan
Nadia Kanaeva
Skating clubSkating Club of New York
Began skatingNovember 1999
RetiredNovember 19, 2018[2]
Highest WS6th (2016–2017)
Medal record
Men's singles
Representing the  United States
Olympic Games
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Pyeongchang Team
Four Continents Championships
Gold medal – first place 2010 Jeonju Singles
World Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 2009 Sofia Singles
Gold medal – first place 2008 Sofia Singles
Junior Grand Prix Final
Gold medal – first place 2007–2008 Gdańsk Singles

Adam Richard Rippon (born November 11, 1989) is an American figure skater. He won the 2010 Four Continents Championships and the 2016 U.S. National Championships. Earlier in his career, he won the 2008 and 2009 World Junior Championships, the 2007–2008 Junior Grand Prix Final, and the 2008 U.S. junior national title. Rippon was selected to represent the United States at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

At the 2018 Winter Olympics, Rippon won a bronze medal as part of the figure skating team event. Later that year, he won season 26 of Dancing with the Stars with professional dancer Jenna Johnson. Rippon announced his retirement from competitive figure skating in November 2018. He was included in Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2018.[3]

Early life[edit]

Adam Rippon was born on November 11, 1989, in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the first child in his family of six children.[4] His parents divorced in 2004. He attended an elementary Catholic school called "Our Lady of Peace".[5]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Rippon started to skate when he was ten years old; his mother skated and brought him along to the rink.[6][7] He was coached by Yelena Sergeeva from 2000 to 2007.[8]

In the 2004–2005 season, Rippon won the silver medal at the Novice level at the 2005 U.S. Championships. After Nationals he was assigned a spring international assignment, Triglav Trophy in Slovenia 2005, and competed in the Junior division, finishing first and winning the gold medal. In the 2005–06 season, he debuted on the ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit. He competed at the 2005–06 ISU Junior Grand Prix event in Croatia and placed 6th. At the 2006 U.S. Championships, he finished 11th at the junior level. In the 2006–2007 season, Rippon did not compete on the Junior Grand Prix circuit. He placed 6th on the junior level at the 2007 U.S. Championships. Following the event, he left Sergeeva and began working with Nikolai Morozov in February 2007 at the Ice House in Hackensack, New Jersey.[6][9]

2007–2008 season[edit]

In the 2007–2008 season, Rippon competed on the 2007–2008 ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit. At his first event, the Harghita Cup in Miercurea Ciuc, Romania, he won the gold medal. He then won the silver medal at the Sofia Cup in Sofia, Bulgaria. These two medals qualified him for the ISU Junior Grand Prix Final. At that event, Rippon won the gold medal, and became the first man to break 200 points at a Junior level competition.

He went on to the 2008 U.S. Championships, where he won the Junior title.[10] The Professional Skaters Association recognized Rippon as having the best men's free skate at the National Championships and was awarded the EDI Award.[11] He earned a trip to the 2008 Junior Worlds, where he won the gold medal after finishing first in both segments.

2008–2009 season[edit]

Rippon moved up to the senior level in the 2008–2009 season. In the Grand Prix season he was assigned to compete at the 2008 Skate America where he placed eighth and the 2008 Cup of Russia where he placed third in the short program and fifth overall. In late November 2008, Rippon left Morozov. In December 2008, he moved to Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to begin training with Brian Orser at the Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club.[12] Rippon officially announced his coaching change on January 2, 2009.[13]

At the 2009 U.S. Championships, his senior-level national debut, he placed seventh. He was named to the team for the 2009 Junior World Championships. At Junior Worlds, in his two programs, he landed a total of three 3A jumps, one in combination with a 2T. He won the competition, scoring 222.00 points and becoming the first single skater to win two World Junior titles.[14]

2009–2010 season[edit]

Rippon sprained his ankle during the summer and missed some training time.[15] For the 2009–2010 season, Rippon was assigned to two Grand Prix events. At the 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard, he placed third in both segments of the competition and was awarded the bronze medal. At the 2009 NHK Trophy, he finished 6th after placing 8th in the short and 5th in the free.

At the 2010 U.S. Championships, Rippon finished 5th overall after ranking 4th in both segments. He had a fall on his step sequence in the short program.[16] Following the event, he was named as a second alternate for the 2010 Winter Olympics and 2010 World Championships, and assigned to the 2010 Four Continents Championships.[17] At Four Continents, he placed 7th in the short program and first in the free skate, winning the gold medal. He was included in the U.S. team to Worlds after other skaters withdrew; he placed 7th in the short program, 5th in the free skate, and 6th overall.[citation needed]

2010–2011 season[edit]

Rippon began his season at the Japan Open, where he finished ahead of Daisuke Takahashi and Evgeni Plushenko.[18] His assigned Grand Prix events for the 2010–2011 ISU Grand Prix season were the 2010 Skate Canada International and the 2010 Skate America.[19] In Canada, Rippon had a collision with Patrick Chan during the morning practice before the short program but stated, "That was definitely the most exciting collision, maybe not the most dangerous."[20] He won the bronze medal after placing third in the short and second in the free skate. At the 2010 Skate America, Rippon placed third in the short program, 7th in the free skate, and 4th overall.

At the 2011 U.S. Championships, Rippon finished 5th and was assigned to the 2011 Four Continents Championships, where he had the same result.[citation needed]

On June 16, 2011, Rippon announced he was leaving Canada and returning to train in the US at the Detroit Skating Club in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, home of his DSC-based choreographer Pasquale Camerlengo and began training under the charge of Jason Dungjen.[18][21][22]

2011–2012 season[edit]

In the 2011–2012 season, Rippon was assigned to 2011 Skate Canada and 2011 Trophée Eric Bompard as his Grand Prix events. He opened the season with a 4th-place finish at Skate Canada. This competition marked Rippon's first attempt at including a quad jump in his free program. At Trophée Bompard, he was 4th in the short program, 3rd in the long, and finished 4th overall. Rippon won the silver medal at the 2012 U.S. Championships. He finished 4th at Four Continents and 13th at Worlds.[citation needed]

2012–2013 season[edit]

In September 2012, Rippon announced a coaching change, moving to train with Rafael Arutyunyan in Lake Arrowhead, California.[23][24] At the 2012 Cup of China, Rippon collided with China's Song Nan – who sustained a concussion and withdrew – a minute into the final warm up before the free skate.[25][26] Rippon said, "I kind of turned around to go into a jump and I think when Nan Song and I saw each other we both tried to avoid each other, but we went in the same way and we went head first into each other."[25] Rippon finished 4th at the event and 8th at the 2012 NHK Trophy. At the 2013 U.S. Championships, he landed three triple Axels and finished 5th.[27] He was assigned to the 2013 Four Continents but withdrew after sustaining an ankle injury on February 2, 2013.[28]

2013–2014 season[edit]

In October 2013, Rippon competed at the 2013 Skate America. He included a quadruple Lutz in both his short and long programs. He set personal bests in both segments, capturing the silver medal and finishing as the top American over Max Aaron and Jason Brown.[29] In November he competed for the NHK Trophy and posted a new ISU personal best in the short program 82.25. He landed a quadruple toe loop in both segments and finished fourth overall.[citation needed]

2014–2015 season[edit]

In October 2014, Rippon competed at the 2014 CS Finlandia Trophy finishing first in the free program and second overall. At the end of October he finished 7th in the free skate and 10th overall at the 2014 Skate Canada International. In November he finished 5th at the 2014 Trophee Eric Bompard after placing third in the free skate. Rippon adjusted his blade brand and mount, took on a new trainer to work with his team and met with renewed consistency at U.S. Championships, landing effortless triple Axels and once again including a quadruple Lutz in his short and long programs. He went on to win the free skate portion of the competition and finished second overall with the silver medal. He was assigned to both the Four Continents team and the Worlds team.[30]

2015–2016 season[edit]

Rippon won gold at the 2016 U.S. Championships.[31] He placed sixth at the 2016 World Championships in Boston with a program to a medley of Beatles tunes.[32] The audience gave him a standing ovation.[33]

2016–2017 season[edit]

Rippon at the 2016–2017 Grand Prix Final
Rippon at the 2016–2017 Grand Prix Final

After taking bronze at the 2016 CS U.S. Classic, Rippon won bronze at both of his Grand Prix competitions – the 2016 Skate America and 2016 Trophée de France. As a result, he qualified for the first time to the Grand Prix Final. He would finish 6th at the event in Marseille, France.

During an off-ice warmup on January 6, 2017, Rippon sprained his left ankle and fractured the fifth metatarsal bone in his left foot, resulting in his withdrawal from the 2017 U.S. Championships.[34]

2017–2018 season[edit]

Starting his season strong with a bronze medal at 2017 CS Finlandia Trophy, Rippon then went on to win silver medals in both of his Grand Prix assignments, 2017 NHK Trophy and 2017 Skate America. His placements at these events qualified him for his second Grand Prix Final.[35] During his free skate at Skate America, Rippon fell on his shoulder while executing a quadruple Lutz, but he was able to continue with his performance without stopping.[36] At the 2018 U.S. Championships, Rippon placed 4th. On January 7, 2018, he was one of three men selected to represent Team USA at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.[37] At the 2018 Winter Olympics, Rippon won a bronze medal in the figure skating team event as part of the U.S. team, which made him the United States' first openly gay male athlete to win a medal at the Winter Olympics.[38] In the individual men's event, he placed 7th in the short program and 10th in the free skate to finish 10th overall.[citation needed]

On November 19, 2018, Rippon announced his retirement from competitive figure skating.[39][40][41]

Coaching career[edit]

Rippon has been a second coach to Mariah Bell since the 2021–2022 season.[42][43]

Dancing with the Stars[edit]

On April 13, 2018, Rippon was announced as one of the celebrities who would compete on season 26 of Dancing with the Stars. His professional partner was Jenna Johnson.[44] They won the competition.[45][46]

Adam Rippon - Dancing with the Stars (season 26)
Week Dance Music Judges' scores[a] Total score Result
1 Cha-cha-cha "Sissy That Walk" — RuPaul 8 8 8 24 Safe
2 Quickstep "Make Way" — Aloe Blacc 9 9 10 37[b] Safe
Freestyle
(Team 1970s Football)
"Instant Replay" — Dan Hartman 9 9 9 37[c]
3 Contemporary "O" — Coldplay 10 9 10 39[d] Safe
Jive
(Dance-off)
"Johnny B. Goode" — Chuck Berry Winner 2[e]
4 Jazz "Anything You Can Do" — Bernadette Peters & Tom Wopat 10 10 10 30 Winner
Freestyle "Scooby Doo Pa Pa" — DJ Kass 9 9 10 28
  1. ^ Individual judges' scores are listed in the following order: Carrie Ann Inaba, Len Goodman, Bruno Tonioli.
  2. ^ Adam also received a score of 9 from guest judge Rashad Jennings.
  3. ^ Adam's team also received a score of 10 from guest judge Rashad Jennings.
  4. ^ Adam also received a score of 10 from guest judge David Ross.
  5. ^ Adam received two bonus points for winning this dance-off.

Signature moves[edit]

Rippon's signature move is a triple Lutz that he executes with both arms above his head, colloquially dubbed the "Rippon Lutz".[47][48] He is capable of performing the triple Lutz/double toe loop/double loop jump combination with one hand over his head in all three jumps (colloquially named the "'Tano Lutz" after Brian Boitano, who popularized the move).[citation needed]

Personal life[edit]

On October 2, 2015, Rippon publicly came out as gay.[49][50][51]

In March 2018, Rippon appeared at the 90th Academy Awards red carpet wearing a harness designed by Moschino.[52][53][54]

At the Time 100 Gala in April 2019, Rippon honored his mother, a single parent, for her inspiration and dedication to his success.[55] He reminded people that success is not overnight: It requires dedication and the support of others. In addition to his mother, Kelly, he has a close relationship with his siblings.[56]

In 2019, Rippon guest-hosted RuPaul's Drag Race season 11 "Ruveal" livestreams with reigning queen from season 10, Aquaria.[57][58]

In 2019, Rippon appeared in Taylor Swift's "You Need to Calm Down" music video,[59][60][61] which won the MTV Video Music Award for Video of the Year. He also appeared in Superfruit's "The Promise" music video.[62][63]

In his memoir Beautiful on the Outside, Rippon revealed that, before coming out as gay, he briefly dated South Korean Olympic champion Yuna Kim while both were training in Toronto.[5][64]

Rippon and his husband, Jussi-Pekka Kajaala, were married on December 31, 2021.[65][66][67] The two met on Tinder in 2018.[65]

Rippon officiated the wedding of Tyler Barnhardt and Adriana Schaps in Draper, Utah, on June 20, 2023.[68]

Politics[edit]

In February 2018, Rippon raised concerns about then-Vice President Mike Pence being chosen to lead the US delegation to the 2018 Winter Olympics opening ceremony because of Pence's support of legislation and policies deemed hostile to gay people.[69][70]

Rippon endorsed and campaigned for Elizabeth Warren in the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries.[71]

In 2020, Rippon made a donation to The Okra Project, a charity aimed at helping underprivileged black transgender people.[72][73] Russian skater Alexei Yagudin reacted to the donation with an Instagram post calling Rippon and people like him "mistakes of nature" and wishing them to die.[74][75] Yagudin later deleted the post.[76] Rippon criticized Yagudin for the comments and made another $1,000 donation, this time in Yagudin's name, to the same organization.[77]

In 2022, Rippon criticized the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for selecting Beijing as the host city of the 2022 Winter Olympics.[78][79] The athlete said that the IOC was rewarding China's human rights abuses instead of choosing hosting countries that are safe for all athletes to compete.[80]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2017–2018
[81][82]



2016–2017
[87][88][89]



2015–2016
[91][92][93][94][95]
The Beatles medley:
  • Beatles medley [99]
    (selections from the 2015–16 free skating)
    choreo. by Jeffrey Buttle


2014–2015
[101][102][103]


2013–2014
[106]
2012–2013
[107]
2011–2012
[109]
2010–2011
[110]
  • Piano Concerto No. 2
    by Sergei Rachmaninoff
    choreo. by David Wilson


2009–2010
[112]
  • Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
    by Samuel Barber
    choreo. by David Wilson

2008–2009
[9][114]


2007–2008
[81]
  • Toccata and Fugue in D minor
    by Johann Sebastian Bach
    choreo. by Nikolai Morozov

  • "I'll Still be Diggin' On James Brown"[115]
    by Tubes in Town
    choreo. by Nikolai Morozov
2006–2007
[81]
2005–2006
[81]
  • "Just for You"
    by Giovanni
    choreo. by Yelena Segeeva
2004–2005
2003–2004
2002–2003

Competitive highlights[edit]

  • GP – Event of the ISU Grand Prix Series
  • CS – Event of the ISU Challenger Series
  • WD – Withdrew from competition
  • At national events in the United States, pewter medals are awarded for the fourth place.
  • Medals at team events are awarded for the team result only. Individual placements in team events are listed in parentheses.
Competition placements at senior level [116]
Season 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
Winter Olympics 10th
Winter Olympics (Team event) 3rd
(3rd)
World Championships 6th 13th 8th 6th WD
Four Continents 1st 5th 4th WD 8th 10th
GP Final 6th 5th
GP Cup of China 4th
GP France 3rd 4th 5th 3rd
GP NHK Trophy 6th 8th 4th 2nd
GP Rostelecom Cup 5th 4th
GP Skate America 8th 4th 2nd 3rd 2nd
GP Skate Canada 3rd 4th 10th 4th
CS Finlandia Trophy 2nd 2nd 3rd
CS Golden Spin 2nd
CS U.S. Classic 3rd
Gardena Spring Trophy 2nd
Japan Open (Team) 2nd
(1st)
3rd
(5th)
Team Challenge Cup 1st
(3rd)
World Team Trophy 2nd
(7th)
U.S. Championships 7th 5th 5th 2nd 5th 8th 2nd 1st WD 4th
Competition placements at junior level [116]
Season 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09
World Junior Championships 1st 1st
JGP Final 1st
JGP Bulgaria 2nd
JGP Croatia 6th
JGP Romania 1st
Triglav Trophy 1st
U.S. Championships 2nd N 11th 6th 1st

Detailed results[edit]

ISU personal best scores in the +3/-3 GOE system 
Segment Type Score Event
Total TSS 267.53 2016 Trophée de France
Short program TSS 89.04 2017 Skate America
TES 45.76 2016 U.S. Classic
PCS 44.00 2017 Skate America
Free skating TSS 182.28 2016 Trophée de France
TES 94.64 2016 Trophée de France
PCS 88.50 2017 Skate America

Senior level[edit]

  • Small medals for the short program and free skating are only awarded at ISU Championships.
  • At national events in the United States, pewter medals are awarded for fourth place.
  • Medals at team events are awarded for the team result only. The individual placements at the ISU World Team Trophy and 2016 Team Challenge Cup are listed in parentheses.
Results in the 2008–09 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 23–26, 2008 United States 2008 Skate America 8 59.60 7 115.22 8 174.82
Nov 21–23, 2008 Russia 2008 Cup of Russia 3 71.62 5 136.31 5 207.93
Jan 18–25, 2009 United States 2009 U.S. Championships 12 62.22 6 131.54 7 193.76
Results in the 2009–10 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 15–18, 2009 France 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard 3 75.82 3 144.14 3 219.96
Nov 5–8, 2009 Japan 2009 NHK Trophy 8 67.15 5 130.46 6 197.61
Jan 14–24, 2010 United States 2010 U.S. Championships 4 72.91 4 152.16 5 225.07
Jan 25–31, 2010 South Korea 2010 Four Continents Championships 7 69.56 1 156.22 1 225.78
Mar 22–28, 2010 Italy 2010 World Championships 7 80.11 5 151.36 6 231.47
Results in the 2010–11 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 2, 2010 Japan 2010 Japan Open 1 166.63 2
Oct 28–31, 2010 Canada 2010 Skate Canada International 3 77.53 2 155.51 3 233.04
Nov 11–14, 2010 United States 2010 Skate America 3 73.94 7 129.18 4 203.12
Jan 22–30, 2011 United States 2011 U.S. Championships 9 66.26 3 153.78 5 220.04
Feb 15–20, 2011 Chinese Taipei 2011 Four Continents Championships 4 72.71 5 137.30 5 210.01
Results in the 2011–12 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 27–30, 2011 Canada 2011 Skate Canada International 4 72.89 4 145.08 4 217.97
Nov 18–20, 2011 France 2011 Trophée Eric Bompard 4 72.96 3 144.93 4 217.89
Jan 22–29, 2012 United States 2012 U.S. Championships 2 82.94 2 157.93 2 240.87
Feb 7–12, 2012 United States 2012 Four Continents Championships 7 74.92 3 146.63 4 221.55
Mar 26 – Apr 1, 20125 France 2012 World Championships 10 73.55 16 143.08 13 216.63
Apr 19–22, 2012 Japan 2012 ISU World Team Trophy 7 74.93 6 147.80 2 (7) 222.73
Results in the 2012–13 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Nov 2–4, 2012 China 2012 Cup of China 4 71.81 4 133.67 4 205.48
Nov 23–25, 2012 Japan 2012 NHK Trophy 8 67.89 8 142.58 8 210.47
Jan 17–19, 2012 United States 2013 U.S. Championships 6 76.65 6 153.22 5 229.87
Apr 1–3, 2013 Italy 2013 Gardena Spring Trophy 3 63.64 1 155.52 2 219.16
Results in the 2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 18–20, 2013 United States 2013 Skate America 3 80.26 3 160.98 2 241.24
Nov 8–10, 2013 Japan 2013 NHK Trophy 4 82.25 4 151.46 4 233.71
Jan 5–12, 2014 United States 2014 U.S. Championships 6 77.58 7 144.61 8 222.19
Jan 20–26, 2014 Chinese Taipei 2014 Four Continents Championships 8 72.90 8 140.30 8 213.20
Results in the 2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 9–12, 2014 Finland 2014 Finlandia Trophy 3 68.53 1 152.22 2 220.75
Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2014 Canada 2014 Skate Canada International 11 62.83 7 139.09 10 201.92
Nov 21–23, 2014 France 2014 Trophée Éric Bompard 7 76.98 3 148.44 5 225.42
Jan 17–25, 2015 United States 2015 U.S. Championships 5 84.71 1 187.77 2 272.48
Feb 9–15, 2015 South Korea 2015 Four Continents Championships 12 68.37 10 143.93 10 212.30
Mar 23–29, 2015 China 2015 World Championships 11 75.14 8 154.57 8 229.71
Results in the 2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 9–11, 2015 Finland 2015 Finlandia Trophy 3 69.29 1 154.89 2 224.18
Oct 30 – Nov 1, 2015 Canada 2015 Skate Canada International 3 80.36 5 159.33 4 239.69
Nov 20–22, 2015 Russia 2015 Rostelecom Cup 6 78.77 2 169.86 4 248.63
Dec 3–5, 2015 Croatia 2015 Golden Spin of Zagreb 3 72.23 2 165.64 2 237.87
Jan 16–24, 2016 United States 2016 U.S. Championships 3 88.01 1 182.74 1 270.75
Mar 28 – Apr 3, 2016 United States 2016 World Championships 7 85.72 4 178.72 6 264.44
Apr 22–24, 2016 United States 2016 Team Challenge Cup 5 86.05 3 166.68 1 (3) 252.73
Results in the 2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 14–18, 2016 United States 2016 U.S. Classic 1 87.86 3 160.38 3 248.24
Oct 1, 2016 Japan 2016 Japan Open 5 166.85 3
Oct 21–23, 2016 United States 2016 Skate America 2 87.32 3 174.11 3 261.43
Nov 11–13, 2016 France 2016 Trophée de France 4 85.25 2 182.28 3 267.53
Dec 8–11, 2016 France 2016–2017 Grand Prix Final 6 83.93 6 149.17 6 233.10
Results in the 2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 6–8, 2017 Finland 2017 Finlandia Trophy 3 83.69 2 166.19 3 249.88
Nov 10–12, 2017 Japan 2017 NHK Trophy 4 84.95 2 177.04 2 261.99
Nov 24–26, 2017 United States 2017 Skate America 2 89.04 1 177.41 2 266.45
Dec 7–10, 2017 Japan 2017–18 Grand Prix Final 6 86.19 5 168.14 5 254.33
Dec 29, 2017 – Jan 8, 2018 United States 2018 U.S. Championships 2 96.52 4 171.82 4 268.34
Feb 9–12, 2018 South Korea 2018 Winter Olympics (Team event) 3 172.98 3
Feb 16–17, 2018 South Korea 2018 Winter Olympics 7 87.95 10 171.41 10 259.36

Junior level[edit]

The men's podium at the 2007–08 ISU Junior Grand Prix Final. From left: Brandon Mroz (2nd), Adam Rippon (1st), Armin Mahbanoozadeh (3rd).
Results in the 2004–05 season 
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Apr 13–17, 2005 Slovenia 2005 Triglav Trophy 4 1 1
Results in the 2005–06 season 
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 6–9, 2005 Croatia 2005 JGP Croatia 6 48.85 5 97.72 6 146.57
Jan 7–15, 2006 United States 2006 U.S. Championships 8 49.54 12 84.65 11 134.19
Results in the 2006–07 season 
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Jan 21–28, 2007 United States 2007 U.S. Championships 7 52.82 7 105.68 6 158.50
Results in the 2007–08 season 
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 6–9, 2007 Romania 2007 JGP Romania 1 64.61 1 121.33 1 185.94
Oct 3–6, 2007 Bulgaria 2007 JGP Bulgaria 1 64.41 2 123.26 2 187.67
Dec 6–9, 2007 Poland 2007–08 JGP Final 1 68.43 1 134.77 1 203.20
Jan 20–27, 2008 United States 2008 U.S. Championships 1 71.33 1 142.43 1 213.76
Feb 25 – Mar 2, 2008 Bulgaria 2008 World Junior Championships 1 69.35 1 130.55 1 199.90
Results in the 2008–09 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Feb 23 – Mar 1, 2009 Bulgaria 2009 World Junior Championships 1 74.30 1 147.70 1 222.00

Filmography[edit]

Year Media Role Notes
2018 Dancing with the Stars Contestant Season 26 (4 episodes)
Will & Grace Timothy Season 10; Episode 8
Ridiculousness Himself Season 11; Episode 1
Dancing with the Stars: Juniors Judge Season 1 (9 episodes)
2019 RuPaul's Drag Race Judge Season 11; Episode 6: "Draglympics"
(Guest judge and choreographer)
You Need to Calm Down Himself Appearance in Taylor Swift's music video
2019–2020 Whose Line Is It Anyway? Himself Season 7; Episode 6
Season 8; Episode 14
2020 What Would You Do? Himself Season 16; Episode 2
This Day in Useless Celebrity History Host
The Eric Andre Show Himself Season 5; Episode 1: "A King is Born"
Sugar Rush Guest Judge Christmas Season 2, Episode 1
2021 Messyness Co-host [citation needed]
Nickelodeon's Unfiltered Himself Episode: "That's A Corny Dog!"
2023 Stars on Mars Himself Winner

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Both the 2017–2018 short program and an exhibition program from early 2017 are based on the same music composition, "Diamonds". However, the vocal performer and the choreography are different.
  2. ^ Rippon performed the song, but did not skate at the 2017 NHK Trophy gala exhibition.
  3. ^ Rippon performed the song, and skated to the original version of the song by Rihanna at the 2017 Grand Prix Final gala exhibition.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Adam Rippon". Team USA. Archived from the original on March 11, 2018. Retrieved January 8, 2018.
  2. ^ Note to self: Adam Rippon reflects on "wild" journey, on and off the ice (TV show). This Morning. CBS. November 19, 2018 – via YouTube.[dead YouTube link]
  3. ^ "Adam Rippon: The world's 100 most influential people". Time. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  4. ^ "Adam Rippon poised to be the next big star". lifeskate.com. September 26, 2010. Archived from the original on September 29, 2010. Retrieved September 29, 2010.
  5. ^ a b Rippon, Adam (2019). Beautiful on the Outside. New York. ISBN 978-1-5387-3240-3. OCLC 1110951558.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link)
  6. ^ a b Mittan, Barry (December 11, 2007). "Rippon rips up competition". SkateToday. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  7. ^ Lozano, Silvia (2010). "Adam Rippon: "If you can do it with one arm, why not two!". AbsoluteSkating.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010.
  8. ^ "Rippon ends professional relationship with Orser". IceNetwork. April 1, 2011. Archived from the original on March 15, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c Mittan, Barry (April 12, 2008). "Adam Rippon: Now He Belongs". GoldenSkate.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010.
  10. ^ Staed, Becca (January 25, 2008). "Adam Rippon wins junior men's gold". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on May 19, 2011. Retrieved December 22, 2010.
  11. ^ "Six Skaters Honored with PSA Edi Awards". U.S. Figure Skating. May 16, 2008. Archived from the original on November 12, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2008.
  12. ^ "Adam Rippon: A happy New Year dawns". International Figure Skating. January 1, 2009. Archived from the original on January 10, 2009. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
  13. ^ "2008 World Junior Champion Adam Rippon announces coaching change". U.S. Figure Skating. January 2, 2009. Archived from the original on November 12, 2014. Retrieved January 2, 2009.
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External links[edit]