Aden Ibrahim Aw Hirsi

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Aden Ibrahim Aw Hirsi
ادم ابراهيم او حرسي
Governor of Gedo
In office
2006–2008
Personal details
Born 1978
Gedo, Somalia

Aden Aw Hirsi (Somali: Aaden Aw Xirsi, Arabic: ادم او حرسي‎‎) (born 1978) is a Somali politician and author. He is the minister of constitution, justice and religion of Jubaland Region

Biography[edit]

Aden hails from the Marehan Rer Diini Subclan. The great grandson of Sheikh Aw Hirsi, a well-known Qadiri sufi leader, Aden Ibrahim Aw Hirsi, was born in 1978 in the southern Gedo region of Somalia. Aden was born to Hafitha Sheikh Ali and Ibrahim Moallim Yuusuf Guuleed Aw Hirsi in Sarinley neighborhood of Baardheere district in December. At the time of growing up, Sarinley was home to one of the best Koranic Schools in the country, Moallim Ahmed Sarmaaleh's Koranic School. Also, present in Sarinley is the tomb of Sayyid Warsame Jama of the Qadiriyyah order of Sufism.

Education[edit]

He attended primary and secondary schools in Sarinley and Bardera. He spent a good part of his growing years in the Bardera District, where many of his family members and relatives have lived for generations.

From 2000 until 2004, Aden studied political science and government at Ohio Dominican University. Prior to attending college in the United States, he had trained in Islamic studies, where he concentrated on Sufism. Aden also had his Masters from Kenya Methodist University.

Career[edit]

Earlier in life Aden was intrigued by the dynamics of languages. He focused mainly on Tafseer (Quran Translationin Arabic) and English Books. A few years later, he began his translation and interpreting career while still a teenager and in high school. He continued performing interpreting and relief jobs through much of the late 1990s. In this capacity, he had worked for CARE International and UNHCR as a local staff, and later co-founded SADO, a local non-profit organization.[1]

Between 2003 and 2006, Aden taught [3] English and Somali at Columbus State Community College[2] in Columbus city of State of Ohio of The United States. In 2008, he cofounded SomaliCAN, an outreach and advocacy organization that provides services and information to Somalis in the United States of America and beyond.

Political career[edit]

In November 2006, he was chosen to become the governor of the Gedo region in Somalia. While in office,Governor Aw Hirsi, a former relief worker himself, persuaded numerous international relief organizations to open offices in the region.[4] As a result, a number of disasters were averted.[3] In the same year, Al-Shabaab, a local Islamist group unhappy with the presence of many foreign relief organizations in the region, declared its strong opposition to Aw Hirsi's popular[4] administration. The group consequently orchestrated a peaceful way to frustrate and ultimately oust the governor by bankrolling Aw Hirsi's challenger, Hussein Ismail, the latter of whom then gathered a clan militia and threatened to start a civil war in the region.

In May 2008, faced with the dilemma of choosing between bloodshed and resignation from his gubernatorial post, Aw Hirsi resigned from office and enabled district-based local elections that would see Ismail assume governorship.

Since 2011, Aden has been a senior political adviser to Prime Ministers of Somalia, Dr. Abdi Farah Shirdon, Abdiweli Sheikh Ahmed Mohamed, Omar Abdirashid Sharmarke the later of whom he currently advises.

Aden is now the minister of Justice constitution and religious affairs of Jubbaland state of Somalia.

Literary career[edit]

As a writer, Aw Hirsi has authored numerous books and glossaries including:

  • Somali for Icebreaking, 2003[5]
  • Queen Arraweloh's Mean Throne: Translation, 2001,
  • Things we Have in Common: Short Stories, 2003, and
  • The Somali Court Interpreter, 2005[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://sadosomalia.org/
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ http://www.cadaado.com/view_contents.php?articleid=557[permanent dead link]
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-07. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-10. Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  6. ^ [2]