Admiral-Lord Mountevans rules

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Admiral-Lord Mountevans rules are a set of professional wrestling rules mainly used in British wrestling. They were named after Edward Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans who ordered a unified set of rules written up for professional wrestling in the British Isles.

History[edit]

Professional wrestling in the United Kingdom, under the All In rules, had been popular in the 1930s. However, as a result of a shift in focus away from technical skill and towards violence including usage of weapons, it was banned towards the end of the decade by the London County Council.[1]

After a failed attempt to relaunch the sport with a show at Harringay Arena, Middlesex in 1947 was condemned by journalists as being "fake",[2] Admiral-Lord Mountevans along with radio personality Commander Archibald Bruce Campbell, Maurice Webb MP and Norman Morell, an Amateur wrestling champion and professional wrestling promoter, formed a committee to formalise professional wrestling in the United Kingdom and write up a set of unified rules.[1]

Once the rules were written, they were almost universally accepted with 95% of promotions in the United Kingdom adopting them.[3] In 1952, the rules were adopted by the newly formed Joint Promotions, officially as a way to uphold the committee's ideology but was also considered to be a way for Joint Promotions to effectively control British wrestling.[1]

In London, the new rules led to the ban on professional wrestling being lifted however a by-law authorised by the Home Office and the Metropolitan Police kept female wrestling banned within the Greater London area until 1987.[4]

Weight divisions[edit]

The rules set out a number of weight divisions with maximum weight limits and called for champions to be crowned of each limit. The weight divisions were; Lightweight (154 lb or ~70 kg), Welterweight (165 lb or ~75 kg), Heavy Middleweight (187 lb or ~85 kg), Light Heavyweight (198 lb or ~90 kg), Mid-Heavyweight (209 lb or ~95 kg) and Heavyweight for all weights above 210 lb (95 kg).[2] In the early days, the champions of these weight divisions were also known as Mountevans Champions as the Championships also included Mountevans in their official names.[5]

Rules[edit]

The Admiral-Lord Mountevans rules defined what holds were legal[6] and how a fall could be scored:[7]

A fall could be awarded by the following means:

  • Pinfall
  • Submission
  • Knockout - failing to answer the referee's 10 count when thrown or knocked to the canvas or outside the ring.
  • Technical Knockout - If the opponent is ruled unfit to continue by the referee.
  • Disqualification - generally applicable upon a wrestler receiving the third of three "Public Warnings" given by the referee for serious or persistent offences.

In singles matches for the best of three falls, a win was immediately awarded in the event of a knockout or disqualification, regardless of whether or not falls had previously been scored. Later when Tag Team wrestling was introduced to Britain, generally the disqualified or knocked-out wrestler was eliminated and a single fall awarded to the opposing team. The partner of the eliminated wrestler would then continue the match for any remaining falls under handicap tag conditions.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Listner, John (2005). Slamthology: Collected Wrestling Writings 1991-2004. Lulu.com. p. 255. ISBN 1411653297. 
  2. ^ a b "The History of British Wrestling: Part One". Bleacher Report. 2010-06-10. Retrieved 2012-07-09. 
  3. ^ "(1946) The Rules Governing Professional Wrestling & All the Techniques to go Along With Them". Scribd.com. 2012-04-20. Retrieved 2012-07-09. 
  4. ^ "Historic Bouts". Geocities (archived). 2010-06-10. Retrieved 2012-07-09. 
  5. ^ "No Angel of Islington". Wrestling Heritage. Retrieved 2012-07-09. 
  6. ^ "The Wrestling Furnace Picture Gallery - Wrestling Holds". Wrestling Furnace. Retrieved 2012-07-09. 
  7. ^ "The Wrestling Furnace Picture Gallery - Wrestling Rules". Wrestling Furnace. Retrieved 2012-07-09.