Adnan Kassar

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Adnan Kassar
Minister of State
In office
9 November 2009 – June 2011
Prime Minister Saad Hariri
Minister of Economy and Trade
In office
2004–2005
Prime Minister Omar Karami
Preceded by Marwan Hamadeh
Succeeded by Demianos Khattar
Personal details
Born 1930 (age 87–88)
Beirut, Lebanon
Nationality Lebanese
Alma mater St. Joseph University
Website Official website

Adnan Kassar (Arabic: عدنان القصار; born 1930) is a Lebanese lawyer, businessman and politician, who served at different cabinet posts.

Early life and education[edit]

Kassar was born into a Sunni family in Beirut in 1930.[1][2] He received a law degree from St. Joseph University in 1951.[3][4]

Career[edit]

In addition to being a lawyer, Kassar is a businessman, dealing finance investments. He has founded and owns various companies concerning trade, shipping and travel, and industry and chairman of Kassar Group. He is also shareholder with Walid Jumblatt in a cement manufacturing firm.[1] Kassar served as the president of the Beirut Chamber of Commerce and Industry for nearly thirty years; to which he was elected in January 1972.[5][6] In June 1997, he became the president of the Federation of Chambers of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture in Lebanon.[6] From 1999 to 2000, he headed the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) based in Paris.[5] On 1 January 2001, Richard McCormick, who served as his deputy at the ICC, succeeded Kassar as head of the ICC.[7]

In January 2003, Kassar was appointed member of the patrons committee of the Anglo-Arab organisation.[3] In addition, Kassar and his brother are shareholders of Fransabank, a large Lebanese commercial bank. Kassar is chairman of the bank.[8] He is also chairman of the general union of Arab chambers of commerce, industry and agriculture and of Lebanon’s economic committees.[9][10]

In October 2004, Kassar was appointed minister of economy and trade in the cabinet led by prime minister Omar Karami, replacing Marwan Hamadeh as economy minister.[1][11] His tenure lasted until the year 2005, when Karami resigned from office due to the pressures exerted by Lebanese people as a protest over the assassination of Rafik Hariri.[12] Kassar was succeeded by Demianos Khattah in the post.[5][11] Later Kassar served as the minister of state in the cabinet led by prime minister Saad Hariri from November 2009 to 2011.[8] Kassar was one of the cabinet members appointed by the Lebanese president Michel Suleiman.[13]

Kassar has been regarded as a potential prime minister since the beginning of the 2000s.[1][5][14] After the resignation of prime minister Najib Mikati in March 2013, Kassar himself also announced that he is a "permanent" candidate for this post.[15] However, he was not supported by main factions such as the 14 March or 8 March alliances for the post.[12]

Controversy[edit]

Paradise Papers[edit]

In November 2017 an investigation conducted by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalism cited his name in the list of politicians named in "Paradise Papers" allegations.[16]

Awards[edit]

Kassar has also been given other awards, including, Commander of the Order of La Pléiade and the prize of the Crans Montana Forum (2000).[3]

Personal life[edit]

Kassar was born to Wafiq Kassar, a prominent diplomat who served as Ambassador of Lebanon in Pakistan and Turkey. Kassar is married Raidaa Nathem AlMisqawi and has a daughter, Roula Kassar.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Lebanon Biographies of Potential Prime Ministers". Wikileaks. 3 March 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  2. ^ "Lebanon finally has a government Sulaiman's man seals the deal". Gulf News. 11 November 2009. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "His Excellency Mr Adnan Kassar". Anglo Arab. Archived from the original on 7 March 2014. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  4. ^ "Board of Directors". Fransabank Group. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d "Fatfat names Adnan Kassar as neutral Lebanon PM". Ya Libnan. 15 December 2012. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  6. ^ a b Baroudi, Sami E. (22 September 2000). "Sectarianism and business associations in postwar Lebanon". Arab Studies Quarterly. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  7. ^ "Former US West CEO Elected VP of International Chamber of Commerce; will Become President in 2 Years". PR Newswire. Geneva. 8 January 1999. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  8. ^ a b "Speakers". Fransabank. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  9. ^ "Kassar warns against harming ties with GCC". The Daily Star. 8 March 2013. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  10. ^ "Stunted growth: Lebanon's economy at the mercy of political stability". Albawaba. 4 September 2012. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  11. ^ a b c "Former Ministers". Ministry of Economy and Trade. Archived from the original on 21 February 2013. Retrieved 5 October 2012.
  12. ^ a b Hajj, Elie (4 April 2013). "Tammam Salam Likely March 14 Candidate for Lebanese Premier". Al Monitor. Retrieved 5 April 2013.
  13. ^ "-Hariri Presents 30-Member Cabinet List to President Suleiman". The Daily Star. 8 September 2009. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  14. ^ Shahin, Mariam (1 October 2000). "For liberty, prosperity, fraternity?". The Middle East. Beirut. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  15. ^ "Kassar 'Permanent' Candidate to Premiership, Says Consensus Important". Naharnet. 24 March 2013. Retrieved 25 March 2013.
  16. ^ "Explore The Politicians in the Paradise Papers - ICIJ". ICIJ. Retrieved 2017-12-06.