Adobe Premiere

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Adobe Premiere
10-mac-319e1ff721d6e5484dfda4148501eb9f-Adobe Premiere for Mac 1.0 - About.png
Developer(s)Adobe Systems
SuperMac Technology
Initial releaseDecember 1991; 29 years ago (1991-12)
Final release
6.5 / August 2002; 19 years ago (2002-08)
Operating systemClassic Mac OS
Microsoft Windows
SuccessorAdobe Premiere Pro
TypeVideo editing software

Adobe Premiere was a former video editing software developed by Adobe Systems. It was first launched in 1991, and its final version was released in 2002. It was replaced by Adobe Premiere Pro (introduced in 2003), a rewritten version of Adobe Premiere.

History[edit]

Introduced in December 1991, Premiere was one of the first computer non-linear editing systems.[1] The first version for Mac released in 1991, and the first version for Microsoft Windows was released in September 1993.[2] The project began at SuperMac Technology as ReelTime, a QuickTime-based video editor for its VideoSpigot video capture card.[3] SuperMac engineer Randy Ubillos created a working demo of ReelTime in about 10 weeks while QuickTime was still in beta.[4] The software project was acquired by Adobe Systems in August 1991 and was renamed Adobe Premiere.[3] Ubillos also left SuperMac to join Adobe.[4]

Features[edit]

Premiere was one of the first QuickTime-based video editors on the market.[5] As a result, its ability to import new video formats could also be upgraded by updating to a newer compatible version of Quicktime. However, it was limited to processing video and images that were 1024 pixels wide, or less.[6]

Premiere included 24 transition effects and a plug-in architecture that was compatible with some Photoshop filters.[5]

Release history[edit]

Version Platform Release date Significant changes Codename
Adobe Premiere 1.0 Mac December 1991[7]
  • First release of Premiere
  • QuickTime multimedia and VideoSpigot format support
  • PICT image support
  • Supported up to 160 x 120 pixels movie creation for NTSC and 192 x 144 pixels for PAL
  • Supported 8-bit audio
  • Supported output to video tape[7][8]
Demon
Adobe Premiere 2.0 Mac September 1992[9]
  • QuickTime video and audio capture support
  • Title creation
  • Title, Sequence, and Construction windows
  • Slow/fast motion support
  • 5 audio and 41 movie/still-image filters
  • 49 special effects
  • 16-bit, 44 kHz audio support
  • Filmstrip file format introduced
  • Numbered PICT sequence support[clarification needed]
  • Edit decision list (EDL) support
  • Illustrator text import[clarification needed]
  • SMPTE timecode support[9][10]
Adobe Premiere 3.0 Mac August 1993[11]
  • 99 stereo audio tracks
  • 97 video tracks
  • Video waveform monitor
  • Sub-pixel motion and field rendering
  • Batch digitizing
  • Full framerate preview from disk
  • Enhanced title window[11]
Adobe Premiere 1.0 Windows September 1993[12]
  • First release of Premiere application for Windows platform
  • 24-bit AVI and QuickTime video format support
  • Autodesk Animator file support
  • AVI, AIFF, and WAV audio format support
  • Still image support (Photoshop, BMP, DIB, PCX, PICT, PCX, and TIFF formats)
  • Two video tracks, three audio tracks, and one transition and superimpose track
  • No EDL, titling, and motion and device control available in then current Mac (v3.0) release[13][14][15]
Adobe Premiere 1.1 Windows February 1994[16]
  • AdobeCap video capture module
  • Expanded graphics and audio file support
  • TARGA and ADPCM file support
  • Image sequence import support[16][17]
Adobe Premiere 4.0 Mac July 1994[18]
  • Support for 97 superimposition tracks plus two A/B tracks
  • Trim window
  • Dynamic previewing
  • Custom filter and transition creation
  • Time variable filters
  • Batch capture
  • Time-lapse capture
  • NTSC 29.97 frame rate support[18][19][20]
Zambini
Adobe Premiere 4.0 Windows December 1994[21]
  • Adobe moves Windows platform release of Premiere directly from v1.1 to v4.0
  • Premiere 4.0 for Windows matches capabilities of Premiere 4.0 for Macintosh[22]
Adobe Premiere 4.2 Mac October 1995[23]
  • CD-ROM Movie Maker Plug-in
  • Data rate analysis tool
  • Power Macintosh-native Sound Manager 3.1[23]
TopGun
Adobe Premiere 4.2 Windows April 1996[24]
  • 32-bit architecture
  • Long File Names support
  • Background compiling
  • Batch movie maker
  • 4K output support
  • Right-mouse button support
  • Uninstaller utility[25]
Adobe Premiere 4.2 for Silicon Graphics UNIX/SGI July 1997[26]
  • SGI O2 platform exclusive release
  • IRIX 6.3 integration
  • OpenGL accelerated versions of transition and special effects plug-ins
  • Platform-specific plug-ins by Silicon Graphics for combining 3D and video content[27]
Primo
Adobe Premiere 5.0 Windows and Mac May 1998[28]
  • Source/Program editing
  • Title window editor
  • Keyframeable audio and video filters
  • Collapsible tracks
  • Up to three hour project length support[28][29]
Mustang
Adobe Premiere 5.1 Windows and Mac October 1998[30]
  • QuickTime 3.0 support
  • DPS[expand acronym] Perception support
  • Preview to RAM
  • "Smart" Preview file Timeline export
  • Multi-threaded, dual processor support[30]
Adobe Premiere 6.0 Windows and Mac January 2001[31]
  • Support for web video and DV formats
  • OHCI (IEEE 1394 (FireWire)) support
  • Title editor
  • Storyboard
  • Audio mixer
  • Timeline video track keyframes
Jukebox
Adobe Premiere 6.5 Windows and Mac August 2002
  • Real-time preview
  • Adobe Title Designer
  • Exporting to DVD as MPEG-2
Rockford

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Adobe Premiere 1.0 (Mac)". WinWorld. Retrieved 2020-12-29.
  2. ^ "An Oral History of Adobe Premiere Software Evolution: The First 25 Years". Creative Planet Network. 2017-05-05. Archived from the original on 2020-10-22. Retrieved 2020-12-29.
  3. ^ a b SuperMac War Story 10: The Video Spigot by Steve Blank. 2009-05-11.
  4. ^ a b Back to 1.0: Interview with Adobe Premiere, Final Cut Pro and iMovie developer Randy Ubillos by Alex Gollner, Alex4D. 2015-08-26.
  5. ^ a b VideoSpigot Review by Jon Pugh, TidBITS. 1992-04-20.
  6. ^ Video Editing on Adobe Premiere 1.0 (from 1991) – Krazy Ken's Tech Misadventures by Computer Clan, YouTube. 2018-11-15.
  7. ^ a b Sullivan, Eamonn (January 27, 1992). "Adobe multimedia tool makes nimble partner for QuickTime". PC Week. Vol. 9 no. 4. p. 34.
  8. ^ Thompson, Tom (June 1992). "Two tools of the QuickTime trade". Byte. Vol. 17 no. 6. p. 336.
  9. ^ a b Chadbourne, Teri (September 18, 1992). "Adobe Premiere Version 2.0 Now Available" (Press release). New York: Business Wire.
  10. ^ Green, Doug; Green, Denise (November 16, 1992). "Premiere holds its place as the best multimedia editor". InfoWorld. Vol. 14 no. 46. pp. 142(2).
  11. ^ a b Pane, Patricia J. (August 2, 1993). "Adobe Premiere 3.0 for the Macintosh now available" (Press release). New York: Business Wire.
  12. ^ Peck, LaVon (September 10, 1993). "Adobe Premiere 1.0 for Windows now available" (Press release). New York: Business Wire.
  13. ^ Rosenbaum, Daniel J. (January 1994). "Premiere 1.0 for Windows: digital video production on the PC". Computer Shopper[specify]. Vol. 14 no. 1. pp. 869(2).
  14. ^ Safi, Quabidur R. (October 11, 1993). "Premiere 1.0 for Windows". PC Week. Vol. 10 no. 40. pp. 92(1).
  15. ^ Taft, Darryl K.; Georgianis, Maria V. (August 16, 1993). "Adobe builds presence across multiple platforms". Computer Reseller News. No. 540. pp. 16(1).
  16. ^ a b Schaefer, Sonya (February 7, 1994). "Adobe Systems ships Adobe Premiere 1.1 for Windows" (Press release). New York: Business Wire.
  17. ^ Simone, Louisa[clarification needed] (April 26, 1994). "Adobe Premiere". PC Magazine. Vol. 13 no. 8. pp. 233(2).
  18. ^ a b Pane, Patricia J. (July 25, 1994). "Version 4.0 of Adobe Premiere for the Macintosh now available" (Press release). New York: Business Wire.
  19. ^ Fischer, Andy (April 1995). "Adobe Premiere version 4.0". Computer Life. Vol. 2 no. 4. pp. 118(1).
  20. ^ Brakey, Rob; Jordan, Lawrence (December 1994). "Adobe Premiere 4.0". Macworld. Vol. 11 no. 12. San Francisco. pp. 54(2). Archived from the original on 2009-07-15. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  21. ^ Pane, Patricia J. (December 21, 1994). "Adobe Premiere Version 4.0 for Windows now available" (Press release). New York: Business Wire.
  22. ^ Simone, Luisa[clarification needed] (March 14, 1995). "Adobe Premiere 4.0: video the professional way". PC Magazine. Vol. 14 no. 5. p. 50.
  23. ^ a b "Adobe Premiere 4.2 for Macintosh and Power Macintosh Now Available" (PDF) (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. October 20, 1995. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 13, 1997. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  24. ^ "Adobe Premiere 4.2 for Windows 95 & Windows NT Now Available" (PDF) (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. April 24, 1996. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 13, 1997. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  25. ^ "Adobe® Premiere New Feature Highlights" (PDF) (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. February 27, 1996. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 19, 1996. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  26. ^ "Adobe ships Premiere 4.2 for SGI O2 workstations". What's New at Adobe – July, 1997. Adobe Systems Incorporated. July 21, 1997. Archived from the original on February 4, 1998. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  27. ^ "Adobe Systems to Deliver Silicon Graphics Version Of Adobe Premiere Non-linear Editing Software" (PDF) (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. October 7, 1996. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 13, 1997. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  28. ^ a b "Adobe Premiere 5.0 Now Shipping" (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. May 18, 1998. Archived from the original on July 3, 1998. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  29. ^ "Adobe Premiere 5.0 New Features". Adobe Systems Incorporated. Archived from the original on July 3, 1998. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  30. ^ a b "Adobe Announces Update to Premiere 5.0" (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. October 14, 1998. Archived from the original on February 18, 1999. Retrieved July 6, 2007.
  31. ^ "Adobe Ships Premiere 6.0" (Press release). Adobe Systems Incorporated. January 8, 2001. Archived from the original on April 5, 2001. Retrieved July 6, 2007.

External links[edit]