Adolf Weil (motorcyclist)

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Adolf Weil
NationalityGerman
Born(1938-12-25)25 December 1938
Died12 May 2011(2011-05-12) (aged 72)
Solingen, Germany
Motocross career
Years active1966, 1968–1978
TeamsMaico
Wins7

Adolf Weil (25 December 1938 – 12 May 2011) was a German professional motocross racer. He competed in the FIM 250cc and 500cc Motocross Grand Prix world championships as a rider for the Maico factory racing team during the 1960s and 1970s.

Motocross career[edit]

Weil began competing in the motocross world championships in 1966. He finished second to Håkan Andersson in the 1973 250cc World Championship, and finished in third place three times in the 500cc World Championship.[1][2][3] While he was never able to capture an international title, he won 14 German motocross national championships.[4][5] Weil won the 1973 Trans-AMA championship at the age of 34.[6] He was known as the 'Iron Man' of motocross because he competed for over 20 years in a physically demanding sport that is dominated by younger riders. He raced his entire career on Maico motorcycles. After retiring from competition in 1978, he ran a motorcycle business with his two sons Frank and Jürgen in his hometown of Solingen, Germany.[4]

Motocross Grand Prix Results[edit]

Year Class Team Rank
1966 500cc Maico 19th
1968 250cc Maico 13th
500cc Maico 20th
1969 250cc Maico 15th
500cc Maico 13th
1970 250cc Maico 22nd
500cc Maico 6th
1971 500cc Maico 3rd
1972 500cc Maico 8th
1973 250cc Maico 2nd
1974 500cc Maico 3rd
1975 250cc Maico 4th
1976 500cc Maico 3rd
1977 500cc Maico 10th
1978 500cc Maico 17th

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1973 250cc motocross world championship final standings". memotocross.fr. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  2. ^ "1973 250cc motocross world championship final standings". jwvanessen.com. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  3. ^ Adolf Weil career profile
  4. ^ a b "Godspeed Adolf Weil". motocrossactionmag.com. Retrieved 2016-02-02.
  5. ^ "Adolf Weil Dies At Age 72". cyclenews.com. Retrieved 2016-02-02.
  6. ^ "Trans-AMA Motocross Records". Google Books. Retrieved 2 February 2016.