Adrian Schultheiss

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Adrian Schultheiss
A. Schultheiss cropped.jpg
Schultheiss in 2010.
Personal information
Full name Adrian Alexander Konstantin Schultheiss
Country represented Sweden
Born (1988-08-11) 11 August 1988 (age 28)
Kungsbacka
Home town Gothenburg
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Coach Maria Bergqvist
Joanna Dahlstrand
Former coach Evgeni Lutkov
R. Jensen
C. Helgesson
S. Banova
Choreographer Tony Hulten
Denny Hullen
Galina Lutkova
Skating club Lerum
Training locations Gothenburg, Saffle, Vierumaki, Flims
Began skating 1991
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 218.26
2010 Worlds
Short program 72.35
2010 Worlds
Free skate 145.91
2010 Worlds

Adrian Alexander Konstantin Schultheiss (born 11 August 1988) is a Swedish figure skater. He is the 2006 Swedish national champion, the 2004–2005 Swedish junior national champion, and the 2006 Nordic Champion. He is the first Swedish skater to win a Junior Grand Prix event, which he did in 2005.

Career[edit]

Adrian Schultheiss was born in Kungsbacka, Sweden and began skating at the age of three.[1] He was the Swedish novice champion in 2002 before debuting internationally the next season. Schultheiss skated as a junior through the end of the 2008 season, although by 2005 he had already begun competing as a senior in some international events. In 2006, Schultheiss won the Swedish National championships. In 2007–08, he skated in both senior and junior events and finished a career-best 6th at the 2008 Europeans.[2] He was 13th at 2008 Worlds. The next season, he was 18th at both events.[3]

Schultheiss was selected to represent Sweden at the 2010 Winter Olympics based on his showing at the 2010 Europeans; he finished 15th at the Olympics. At the 2010 Worlds, he skated a strong long program with a quadruple toe loop to finish in the top ten for the first time in his career.[4]

Schultheiss is known for choosing unusual concepts for his programs, most notably his craziness-themed 2009–10 long program, which he skated wearing a straitjacket costume. He has stated that "it's more interesting and important when people try to make some difference from all points of view"[5] and that "if you watch the classical [music]... people get bored easy. You need variation. That's what I’m trying to show."[6]

Schultheiss is the first skater from Sweden to land a quadruple jump in competition, first at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and later at the 2010 Worlds.[citation needed]

Schultheiss parted ways with coach Evgeni Loutkov after 2010 Skate America and began working with Johanna Dahlstrand and Maria Bergqvist.[7] As part of his preparation for the 2011–12 season, he spent eight weeks in Delaware with coach Priscilla Hill.[8] He missed the Swedish Championships due to a back injury and underwent surgery the week before Christmas.[8]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating
2012–2013
[9][10]
  • DubseEpic Symph
    by Robot Boys
  • Jenova Project
    by DatsiK
  • Beta
    by Robot Boys
  • Samuel
    by René Aubry
  • Avant La Pluie (partie II)
    by René Aubry
  • Avant La Pluie (Chykidec' Remix)
    by René Aubry
  • Cry
    by Michael Ortega
2011–2012
[10][11]
  • Nuclear Warhead
    by Black Violin
2010–2011
[10][12]
  • Nuclear Warhead
    by Black Violin

  • Scuba (Amon Tobin remix)
    by Bonobo
  • Romeo and Julieta
    by Raúl di Blasio
  • Romeo and Juliet
    by D. Malikov, Sergei Prokofiev
2009–2010
[13][14]
  • My Way
    by David Mnatsakanyan
  • Christmas Fantasy
    by David Mnatsakanyan
2008–2009
[10][15]
  • Detective
    by Edgar
2007–2008
[16]
  • Electronic Violin
2006–2007
[17]
2005–2006
[18]
  • Equinoxe
    by Jean Michel Jarre
  • Music
    by Yanni
  • Equinoxe
    by Jean Michel Jarre
2004–2005
[19]
  • Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
    by Johann Sebastian Bach
    (modern version)
2003–2004
[20]
2002–2003
[10][21]
  • Alf leila We Leila
    (A Thousand and One Nights)
    by Baligh Hamdi
  • Hayart Albimaak
    (You Bewildered My Heart)
    by Riadel Soumbati, Ahmed Ramy
  • Conan the Barbarian
  • The 7th Voyage of Sinbad

Competitive highlights[edit]

Schultheiss at the 2008 World Championships.

GP: Grand Prix; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[22]
Event 99–00 00–01 01–02 02–03 03–04 04–05 05–06 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12
Olympics 15th
Worlds 13th 18th 9th 25th
Europeans 20th 6th 18th 12th 13th
GP Cup of Russia 6th
GP NHK Trophy 7th 10th
GP Skate America 7th 7th 7th
Crystal Skate 2nd
Finlandia Trophy 5th
Golden Spin 2nd 6th 3rd
Nepela Memorial 4th
Nordics 2nd 1st 2nd 2nd
International: Junior[22]
Junior Worlds 19th 23rd 13th 16th 14th 18th
JGP Final 9th
JGP Andorra 2nd
JGP Austria 4th
JGP Bulgaria WD 6th
JGP Croatia 1st
JGP Czech Rep. 5th
JGP Germany 6th
JGP Italy 17th
JGP Norway 6th
JGP Poland 10th
JGP United States 6th
National[22]
Swedish Champ. 3rd N 1st N 2nd J 1st J 1st J 1st 2nd 2nd WD 2nd 2nd
Levels: N = Novice; J = Junior. WD = Withdrew

Detailed results[edit]

2010–2011 season
Date Event SP FS Total
12–13 November 2010 2010 Skate America 7
63.71
9
124.49
7
188.20
22–24 October 2010 2010 NHK Trophy 10
62.24
11
119.23
10
181.47
2009–2010 season
Date Event SP FS Total
22–28 March 2010 2010 ISU World Championships 12
72.35
7
145.91
9
218.26
14–27 February 2010 2010 Winter Olympic Games 22
63.13
13
137.31
15
200.44

References[edit]

  1. ^ Osborne, Magdalena (2006). "Sweden's Adrian Schultheiss makes a mark". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 7 February 2011. 
  2. ^ Osborne, Magdalena (2008). "Adrian has no doubts". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 23 December 2010. 
  3. ^ Osborne, Magdalena (February 2009). "An update with Adrian Schultheiss at Nordics 2009". AbsoluteSkating.com. Retrieved 23 December 2010. 
  4. ^ "2010 World Figure Skating Championships: Men's Long Recap". 
  5. ^ Eley, Melanie (2008). "Adrian Schultheiss: "Gold is always golden"". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 23 December 2010. 
  6. ^ "Cypress Hill is Now Figure-Skating Music". Sports Illustrated. 19 February 2010. Retrieved 23 December 2010. 
  7. ^ Jangbro, Eva Maria (15 January 2011). "Adrian Schultheiss: "You have to dare to dream..."". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 7 February 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Jangbro, Eva Maria (31 December 2011). "Adrian Schultheiss: "I will be back with two challenging programs!"". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 3 January 2012. 
  9. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 15 April 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e "Programs". AdrianSchultheiss.com. Archived from the original on 27 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 20 March 2012. 
  12. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 16 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 5 May 2010. 
  14. ^ Eley, Melanie (2009). "Adrian Schultheiss answers fan questions". Absolute Skating. Retrieved 23 December 2010. 
  15. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 5 June 2009. 
  16. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2008. 
  17. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2007. 
  18. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 21 May 2006. 
  19. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 16 October 2005. 
  20. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 8 April 2004. 
  21. ^ "Adrian SCHULTHEISS: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 17 August 2003. 
  22. ^ a b c "Competition Results: Adrian SCHULTHEISS". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. 

External links[edit]