Advisory Committee on Vice-Regal Appointments

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The Advisory Committee on Vice-Regal Appointments was established on 4 November 2012 to assist the government of Canada (the Crown-in-Council) with the appointment of the Governor General of Canada, provincial lieutenant governors, and territorial commissioners. The advisory committee on vice-regal appointments was disbanded following the defeat of the Harper ministry in the 2015 federal election, and remains "dormant" under his successor, Justin Trudeau.[1]

The non-partisan committee consisted of its chairperson—the Canadian Secretary to the Queen (most recently Kevin MacLeod)—as well as two permanent federal delegates, one Anglophone (most recently Robert Watt, citizenship judge and former Chief Herald of Canada) and one Francophone (most recently Jacques Monet, constitutional scholar and member of the Canadian Institute of Jesuit Studies); each served for a time not exceeding six years.[2] For the appointment of a lieutenant governor or commissioner, two additional members drawn from the relevant province or territory would be temporarily added as members;[3][4] each was a member for no longer than six months.[2] A representative from the Office of the Prime Minister acted as an observer only.[2]

Various other groups and individuals were consulted before the committee produced a shortlist of candidates; the recommendations were non-binding,[2] as the appointment of the governor general remains the prerogative of the Canadian monarch acting on the advice of the Prime Minister of Canada, the appointment of the lieutenant governors the prerogative of the governor general acting on the advice of the Prime Minister of Canada, and the appointment of the commissioners the prerogative of the governor general acting on the advice of the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs.

The Advisory Committee on Vice-Regal Appointments grew out of the ad hoc committee established in 2010 for the selection of a new governor general following the tenure of Michaëlle Jean. For the task, Prime Minister Stephen Harper convened a special search group—the Governor General Consultation Committee[5]—which consisted of Sheila-Marie Cook, secretary to the Governor General (the chairperson); Kevin MacLeod; Christopher Manfredi, dean of the Faculty of Arts at McGill University; Rainer Knopff, a political scientist at the University of Calgary; Jacques Monet; and Christopher McCreery, historian and private secretary to the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia.[6][7][8] The group, which was described as a "tight circle of monarchists," was instructed to submit a list of non-partisan candidates, each of whom would respect the monarchical aspects of the viceregal office. They conducted extensive consultations with more than 200 people across the country,[8][9] including academics, provincial premiers, current and former political party leaders, former prime ministers, and others, in order to develop a short list of five candidates,[7][10] from which the prime minister would make the final selection.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Queen Elizabeth without Canadian secretary as Liberal government mulls future of job http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/queen-canadian-secretary-royal-visits-heritage-1.4295322
  2. ^ a b c d Office of the Prime Minister of Canada (4 November 2012). "Terms of reference: Advisory Committee on Vice-Regal Appointments". Queen's Printer for Canada. Archived from the original on 5 October 2013. Retrieved 4 November 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ Cheadle, Bruce (4 November 2012), Harper creates new panel to ensure 'non-partisan' vice regal appointments, The Canadian Press, archived from the original on 7 February 2013, retrieved 4 November 2012 Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ Office of the Prime Minister of Canada (4 November 2012). "PM announces new Advisory Committee on Vice-Regal Appointments". Queen's Printer for Canada. Archived from the original on 6 November 2012. Retrieved 4 November 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. ^ Canada News Centre. "Governor General Consultation Committee". Queen's Printer for Canada. Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  6. ^ Galloway, Gloria; Ibbitson, John (8 July 2010), "Next governor-general unveiled", The Globe and Mail, retrieved 10 July 2010
  7. ^ a b "David Johnston: a worthy viceroy", The Globe and Mail, 9 July 2010, retrieved 9 July 2010
  8. ^ a b Curry, Bill (11 July 2010), "Selection panel ordered to find non-partisan governor-general: PMO", The Globe and Mail, archived from the original on 16 July 2010, retrieved 11 July 2010 Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  9. ^ Ditchburn, Jennifer (28 June 2010), "Tight circle of monarchists helping Harper pick next Governor General", Winnipeg Free Press, archived from the original on July 8, 2010, retrieved 10 July 2010 Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  10. ^ Office of the Prime Minister of Canada (8 July 2010). "PM welcomes appointment of David Johnston as Governor General Designate". Queen's Printer for Canada. Archived from the original on 12 July 2010. Retrieved 8 July 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  11. ^ Gillespie, Kevin (29 December 2015), Osgoode Constitutional Law Society — Crown & Constitution Speakers' Series: Monarchy in Action, Philosophia regis, retrieved 29 December 2015

External links[edit]