Aeluroidea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Aeluroidea
Temporal range: Oligocene–Holocene
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Superfamily: Aeluroidea

Aeluroidea is an extant superfamily of feline-like carnivores that are, or were, endemic to North America, South America, Africa, and Asia. They appeared during the Oligocene about 33.3 million years ago.[1]

This superfamily includes the extant families of: Felidae (cats), Herpestidae (mongooses) and Hyaenidae (hyenas).

Extinct genera include Africanictis, Anictis, Asiavorator, Haplogale, Herpestides, Mioprionodon, Moghradictis, Palaeoprionodon, Proailurus, Shandgolictis, Stenogale, and Stenoplesictis.

Taxonomy[edit]

Aeluroidea was named by Flower (1869). It was assigned to Carnivora by Flower (1883) and Carroll (1988); and to Feliformia by Bryant (1991).[2][3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paleobiology Database: Aeluroidea basic info.
  2. ^ W. H. Flower. 1883. On the arrangement of the Orders and Families of existing Mammalia. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1883:178-186
  3. ^ R. L. Carroll. 1988. Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution. W. H. Freeman and Company, New York 1-698
  4. ^ H. N. Bryant. 1991. Phylogenetic relationships and systematics of the Nimravidae (Carnivora). Journal of Mammalogy 72(1):56-78