Aero Engine Corporation of China

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Aero Engine Corporation of China
Native name
中国航空发动机集团
TypeState-owned
IndustryAerospace engineering
PredecessorAeroengine related divisions of Aviation Industry Corporation of China
FoundedAugust 28, 2016; 4 years ago (2016-08-28)
Headquarters,
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Cao Jianguo (Chairman)
ProductsAircraft engine
Number of employees
ca. 96000 (2016)
ParentSASAC
Subsidiaries
Websitewww.aecc.cn
Aero Engine Corporation of China
Simplified Chinese中国航空发动机集团
Traditional Chinese中國航空發動機集團
Abbreviation
Simplified Chinese中国航发
Traditional Chinese中國航發

Aero Engine Corporation of China (AECC) is a Chinese state-owned aerospace manufacturer focused on the design and development of aeroengine and related technology. The company was established on August 28, 2016.[1] At launch, AECC was to be capitalised with US$7.5 billion with AVIC and COMAC both shareholders, China's two main state aerospace companies.[2]

The corporation consists of 46 affiliate companies, including 22 engine companies, several institutes, 3 aeroengine-repairing factories and some other small companies, with the majority of the affiliate companies having been split from Aviation Industry Corporation of China.

The main institutes under AECC are Beijing Institute of Aerial Materials, Shenyang Engine Design and Research Institute, China Gas Turbine Research Institute, China Aero Power Machine Research Institute, Guizhou Aero-Engine Research Institute, and Chine Aero Power Control System Institute.

The main subsidiaries of AECC are Harbin Dong'an Engine Manufacturing Company, Shenyang Liming Engine Manufacturing Company, Chengdu Engine Manufacturing Company, Xi'an Aero-Engine Manufacturing Company, Liyang Engine Manufacturing Company, and Shanghai Commercial Aero-Engine Manufacturing Company.

Products[edit]

Turbofans[edit]

Model Name Prototype Status Fitted on Producer Note
WS-9 Spey 202 In production JH-7 Xi'an Aero-Engine Corporation
WS-10 In production J-10, J-11, J-15, J-16, J-20 Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation Core engine is based on reverse engineered CFM-56
WS-11 AI-25 In production JL-8 South Aviation Industry Corporation
WS-13 RD-93 In production FC-31 Guizhou Liyang Aeroengine Corporation
WS-15 In development J-20 Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation
WS-17 In development L-15 Guizhou Liyang Aeroengine Corporation
WS-18 D-30KP-2 In production Y-20, H-6K AECC Chengdu Engine (Group) Corporation
WS-19 In development FC-31 Guizhou Liyang Aeroengine Corporation Previously called S3-2 and built by Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation at proof of concept stage
WS-20 In development Y-20 Xi'an Aero-Engine Corporation Core engine is based on reverse engineered CFM-56
CJ-1000A In development C919 Commercial Aircraft Engine Corporation
AEF50E In production Guizhou Liyang Aeroengine Corporation UAV engine
AEF3500 In development CR929 Commercial Aircraft Engine Corporation Previously called CJ-2000

Turboprops[edit]

Model Name Prototype Status Fitted on Producer Note
WJ-5 AI-24 In production Y-7 Harbin Dong'an Engine(Group) Corporation Previously produced by South Aviation Industry
WJ-6 AI-20M In production Y-8, Y-9, AG-600 South Aviation Industry Corporation
WJ-9 In production Y-12 South Aviation Industry Corporation Core engine is based on WZ-8
AEP50E In production Wing Loong II South Aviation Industry Corporation UAV engine based on WJ-9
AEP80 In development South Aviation Industry Corporation Core engine is based on WZ-9
AEP500[3] In development South Aviation Industry Corporation Civil WJ-10[verification needed]

The AEP500's 5,000 kW (6,700 hp) equivalent power is similar to the Dash 8 Q400's 4,600 kW Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150, to propel a 74-100 seats airliner at Mach 0.6 and FL300-330. It has a three-shaft layout for compactness and performance retention, the low-pressure compressor has four axial stages while the high-pressure compressor has one axial and one centrifugal stage, both driven by single stages turbines. A demonstrator without the three stage power turbine should be run in 2022/2023, a technology demonstrator in 2025, and certification is targeted for 2035 Takeoff BSFC should be below 260 g/kW/h (0.43 lb/hp/hr). The 5,000-kW WJ-10 was intended for the Y-19 airlifter and may be introduced in the 2020s. A 5,000-kW engine could power a 110 t (240,000 lb) MTOW airlifter but more for higher performance like the Airbus A400M.[4]

Turboshafts[edit]

Model Name Prototype Status Fitted on Producer Note
WZ-6 Turmo In production Z-8, Z-18 Changzhou Lanxiang Machinery Corporation
WZ-8 Arriel In production Z-9, Z-19, Z-11 South Aviation Industry Corporation
WZ-9 In production Z-10 South Aviation Industry Corporation
WZ-10 In production Z-20 South Aviation Industry Corporation
WZ-16 Ardiden3 In production Z-15 Harbin Dong'an Engine(Group) Corporation Joint venture with Turbomeca
AES100[3] In development AC-322 South Aviation Industry Corporation Civil version of WZ-9

Turbojet[edit]

Model Name Prototype Status Fitted on Producer Note
WP-6 RD-9 In production Q-5 AECC Chengdu Engine (Group) Corporation Previously produced by Shenyang Liming
WP-7 R-11 In production J-7 Guizhou Liyang Aerogngine Corporation Previously produced by Shenyang Liming
WP-8 AM-3 In production H-6 Xi'an Aero-Engine Corporation
WP-13 R-13 In production J-7, J-8 Guizhou Liyang Aerogngine Corporation Developed from WP-7
WP-14 In production J-8 Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation
AEF20E In production AECC Chengdu Engine (Group) Corporation UAV engine, previously called Huanglong

Piston engines[edit]

Model Name Prototype Status Fitted on Producer
HS-5 ASh-62 In production Y-5, N-5, Y-11 South Aviation Industry Corporation
HS-6 AI-14 In production CJ-6 South Aviation Industry Corporation
HS-9 O-540 In production South Aviation Industry Corporation
HS18 In production Nanjing Light Aero-power Corporation
HS27 In production Nanjing Light Aero-power Corporation
HS36 In production Nanjing Light Aero-power Corporation
HS55 In production Nanjing Light Aero-power Corporation
HS118 In production Nanjing Light Aero-power Corporation

Gas turbine[edit]

Model Name Prototype Power Status Fitted on Producer Note
QD16 In production Based on WJ-5 core engine
QD20 In production Based on WJ-6 core engine
QD70/QC70 7 MW In production 726 LCAC Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation Based on WS-10 core engine
QD128 12 MW In production Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation Based on WP-14 core engine
QD185/QC185 17 MW In production Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation Based on WS-10 core engine
QD280/QC280 UGT-25000 25~27 MW In production Type 052C, Type 052D, Type 055 Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation
QD400 40 MW In development Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation Based on WS-10 core engine
R0110 UGT110000 up to 110 MW In production Shenyang Liming Aeroengine Corporation

Controversy[edit]

The United States Department of Defense believes the AECC is linked to the People's Liberation Army.[5] In November 2020, Donald Trump issued an executive order prohibiting any American company or individual from owning shares in companies that the United States Department of Defense has listed as having links to the People's Liberation Army, which included Aero Engine Corporation of China.[6][7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 中国航空发动机集团有限公司在京召开成立大会 (Press release) (in Chinese). Ministry of Industry and Information Technology. 2016-08-29. Retrieved 2016-08-29.
  2. ^ Alex Derber (Sep 21, 2017). "Sino-Russian Widebody Engine Under Discussion". Aviation Week Network.
  3. ^ a b 中创网 (2018-08-14). "关于中国航发的两款新型民用发动机,你想知道的都在这里_科技_中创网_行业资讯". zctpt.com. Archived from the original on 2018-11-11. Retrieved 2018-11-11.
  4. ^ Bradley Perrett (Sep 25, 2019). "China's AECC Working On A Powerful Turboprop Engine". Aviation Week & Space Technology.
  5. ^ Allen-Ebrahimian, Bethany (June 24, 2020). "Defense Department produces list of Chinese military-linked companies". Axios. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  6. ^ Chen, Shawna (November 12, 2020). "Trump bans Americans from investing in 31 companies with links to Chinese military". Axios. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  7. ^ Pamuk, Humeyra; Alper, Alexandra; Ali, Idrees (2020-11-12). "Trump bans U.S. investments in firms linked to Chinese military". Reuters. Retrieved 2020-11-12.
  8. ^ Swanson, Ana (2020-11-12). "Trump Bars Investment in Chinese Firms With Military Ties". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-11-13.

External links[edit]